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Since Faraday doesn't have documentation, I wasn't able to find it out anywhere. What is "timeout" and what "open timeout" in Faraday?

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If you look at the source code at https://github.com/lostisland/faraday/blob/master/lib/faraday/request.rb then you'll see:

#   :timeout      - open/read timeout Integer in seconds
#   :open_timeout - read timeout Integer in seconds

Not very helpful, perhaps? Well, if you look at Faraday's Net::HTTP adapter at https://github.com/lostisland/faraday/blob/master/lib/faraday/adapter/net_http.rb, you'll see:

http.read_timeout = http.open_timeout = req[:timeout] if req[:timeout]
http.open_timeout = req[:open_timeout]                if req[:open_timeout]

So Faraday's open_timeout is equivalent to Net::HTTP's open_timeout which is documented as:

Number of seconds to wait for the connection to open. Any number may be used, including Floats for fractional seconds. If the HTTP object cannot open a connection in this many seconds, it raises a TimeoutError exception.

And Faraday's timeout is equivalent to Net::HTTP's read_timeout which is documented as:

Number of seconds to wait for one block to be read (via one read(2) call). Any number may be used, including Floats for fractional seconds. If the HTTP object cannot read data in this many seconds, it raises a TimeoutError exception.

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    Awesome answer, thanks :). Yeah, I also came across the Faraday's description, and yeah, it wasn't very helpful. But this is really great :)
    – Janko
    Apr 26, 2012 at 11:43
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    Does timeout includes open_timeout? For example, if everything times out at the limit and we configured to have 4 seconds open_timeout and 6 seconds timeout, do we actually wait only 6 seconds (which includes the 4 seconds) or do we actually wait 4+6 = 10 seconds?
    – Henry Yang
    Dec 14, 2022 at 5:53
  • That Github link is not available anymore; but here's the current location: github.com/lostisland/faraday-net_http/blob/main/lib/faraday/… Mar 14, 2023 at 10:08

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