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I've been searching through the net for a few day looking for the fastest possible way to take a OpenCV webcam capture and display it on an OpenGL context. So far this seems to work OK until I need to zoom.

void Camera::DrawIplImage1(IplImage *image, int x, int y, GLfloat xZoom, GLfloat yZoom)
{
    GLenum format;
        switch(image->nChannels) {
            case 1:
                format = GL_LUMINANCE;
                break;
            case 2:
                format = GL_LUMINANCE_ALPHA;
                break;
            case 3:
                format = GL_BGR;
                break;
            default:
                return;
        }

    yZoom =- yZoom;
        glRasterPos2i(x, y);
        glPixelZoom(xZoom, yZoom);  //Slow when not (1.0f, 1.0f);
        glDrawPixels(image->width, image->height, format, GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, image->imageData);
}

I've heard that maybe taking the FBO approach would be even faster. Any ideas out there on the fastest possible way to get an OpenCV webcam capture to an OpenGL context. I will test everything I see and post results.

  • 2
    glDrawPixels() definitely isn't a great way to do it. Something like this might be better. – Flexo Apr 25 '12 at 21:56
  • I've tried 4 different ways today. Textures don't work well because you need a power of 2 ratio and sub textures slow it down. Using glu to mipmap or any kinda mipmap slows it down. Using glImage API is slow because only mipmap works. So far, the fastest example i've tried is the one above. – aquawicket Apr 26 '12 at 10:58
  • How about uploading the data to a NPOT texture with glTexImage2D(), and then drawing through glBegin(GL_QUADS) ? – karlphillip May 10 '12 at 18:38
3

Are you sure your openGL implementation needs ^2 textures? Even very poor PC implementations (yes Intel) can manage arbitrary sizes now.

Then the quickest is probably to use a openGL Pixel buffer Sorry the code is from Qt, so the function names are slightly different but the sequence is the same

Allocate the opengl Texture

glEnable(GL_TEXTURE_2D);
glGenTextures(1,&texture);

glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D,texture);       
glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_S, GL_REPEAT);
glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_T, GL_REPEAT);
glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MAG_FILTER, GL_NEAREST);
glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MIN_FILTER, GL_NEAREST);          
glTexImage2D(GL_TEXTURE_2D, 0, glFormat, width, height, 0, glFormatExt, glType, NULL ); 

glDisable(GL_TEXTURE_2D);       

Now get a pointer to the texture to use the memeory

glbuffer.bind();
unsigned char *dest = (unsigned char*)glbuffer.map(QGLBuffer::ReadWrite);
// creates an openCV image but the pixel data is stored in an opengl buffer
cv::Mat opencvImage(rows,cols,CV_TYPE,dest);  
.... do stuff ....
glbuffer.unmap(); // pointer is no longer valid - so neither is openCV image

Then to draw it - this should be essentially instant because the data was copied to the GPU in the mapped calls above

glBindTexture(GL_TEXTURE_2D,texture);                       
glTexSubImage2D(GL_TEXTURE_2D, 0, 0,0, width, height, glFormatExt, glType, 0);                                                                                  
glbuffer.release();

By using different types for glFormat and glFormatExt you can have the graphics card automatically convert between opencVs BGR and typical RGBA display formats for you in hardware.

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