35

I'd be more than interesting for me to understand which technique is being used here to persist sensible data since I'm needing to implement a similar solution. Here's a sample connection configuration and the resulting exported snippet:

Oracle SQL Developer Connections http://i44.tinypic.com/2lcwpkg.gif

<?xml version = '1.0' encoding = 'UTF-8'?>
    <References xmlns="http://xmlns.oracle.com/adf/jndi">
        <Reference name="My Connection" className="oracle.jdeveloper.db.adapter.DatabaseProvider" xmlns="">
        <Factory className="oracle.jdeveloper.db.adapter.DatabaseProviderFactory"/>
        <RefAddresses>
            <StringRefAddr addrType="user">
                <Contents>username</Contents>
            </StringRefAddr>
            <StringRefAddr addrType="password">
                <Contents>054D4844D8549C0DB78EE1A98FE4E085B8A484D20A81F7DCF8</Contents>
            </StringRefAddr>
        <SKIPPED />
        </RefAddresses>
    </Reference>
</References>

Any advice would be really appreciated.

11 Answers 11

45

For the curious, what you're actually seeing is the secret key concatenated with the encrypted password. For example, I tried encrypting the password "SAILBOAT" using:

DatabaseProviderHelper.goingOut("SAILBOAT")

In this particular instance, the result was:

0527C290B40C41D71139B5E7A4446E94D7678359087249A463

The first byte is constant:

05

The next 8 bytes represent the randomly generated secret key (for the DES cipher):

27C290B40C41D711

The remaining bytes are the encrypted password:

39B5E7A4446E94D7678359087249A463

Therefore, to decrypt the password, you simply use this:

public static byte[] decryptPassword(byte[] result) throws GeneralSecurityException {
    byte constant = result[0];
    if (constant != 5) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException();
    }

    byte[] secretKey = new byte[8];
    System.arraycopy(result, 1, secretKey, 0, 8);

    byte[] encryptedPassword = new byte[result.length - 9];
    System.arraycopy(result, 9, encryptedPassword, 0, encryptedPassword.length);

    byte[] iv = new byte[8];
    for (int i = 0; i < iv.length; i++) {
        iv[i] = 0;
    }

    Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("DES/CBC/PKCS5Padding");
    cipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, new SecretKeySpec(secretKey, "DES"), new IvParameterSpec(iv));
    return cipher.doFinal(encryptedPassword);
}
  • This code decrypted several of my stored passwords, thanks! – Jason Jan 19 '11 at 17:09
  • 1
    @Jason: You're welcome! I'm glad to help. I found this investigation particularly interesting. :) – Adam Paynter Jan 21 '11 at 12:00
  • 1
    Someone should rewrite this in Javascript so we can decrypt passwords online (without needing to upload it of course!) – MasterScrat Aug 4 '15 at 13:28
11

Note that Tim's password hash above is not for "apps_ro" - presumably he cut and pasted from the wrong place... I won't post the real password in case it's something he doesn't want shared!

I had a similar problem, trying to store my db credentials centrally (for non-secure databases!) and then exporting sql developer xml files. I have no idea what the algorithm is - however, you don't really need to know the algorithm, as you can just call the Oracle java API yourself. If you have SQLDeveloper, just grab the right Jar files:

cp /Applications/SQLDeveloper.App/Contents/Resources/sqldeveloper/BC4J/lib/db-ca.jar .
cp /Applications/SQLDeveloper.App/Contents/Resources/sqldeveloper/jlib/ojmisc.jar .

Then either load them in your Java app, or use something like JRuby as I do:

$jirb
> require 'java'
> require 'ojmisc.jar'
> require 'db-ca.jar'
> Java::oracle.jdevimpl.db.adapter.DatabaseProviderHelper.goingOut("password")    
 => "059D45F5EB78C99875F6F6E3C3F66F71352B0EB4668D7DEBF8" 
> Java::oracle.jdevimpl.db.adapter.DatabaseProviderHelper.goingOut("password")
 => "055CBB58B69B477714239157A1F95FDDD6E5B453BEB69E5D49" 
> Java::oracle.jdevimpl.db.adapter.DatabaseProviderHelper.comingIn("059D45F5EB78C99875F6F6E3C3F66F71352B0EB4668D7DEBF8")
 => "password" 
> Java::oracle.jdevimpl.db.adapter.DatabaseProviderHelper.comingIn("055CBB58B69B477714239157A1F95FDDD6E5B453BEB69E5D49")
 => "password" 

Note that the algorithm, whatever it is, has a random factor so the same password used twice can produce two different hex strings.

  • Thanks much for the contribution kornelissietsma! – Nano Taboada Apr 9 '10 at 13:11
  • This is a great solution, but note the jar locations have changed slightly in sqldeveloper 3. I use this jython code (Oracle ships jython with almost everything...):import sys; sys.path.append(r'C:\sqldeveloper\sqldeveloper\extensions\oracle.datamodeler\lib\ojmisc.jar'); sys.path.append(r'C:\sqldeveloper\modules\oracle.adf.model_11.1.1\db-ca.jar'); from oracle.jdevimpl.db.adapter.DatabaseProviderHelper import goingOut as encrypt; from oracle.jdevimpl.db.adapter.DatabaseProviderHelper import comingIn as decrypt – Giacomo Lacava Aug 25 '12 at 19:56
8

This solution works great for me... Copied from: http://www.mischiefblog.com/?p=912

import javax.crypto.*;
import javax.crypto.spec.*;
import java.security.*;

/**
 * Decrypt passwords stored in Oracle SQL Developer. This is intended for
 * password recovery.
 * 
 * Passwords are stored in
 * ~/.sqldeveloper/system2.1.1.64.39/o.jdeveloper.db.connection
 * .11.1.1.2.36.55.30/connections.xml
 */
public class Decrypt {
    public static byte[] decryptPassword(byte[] result)
            throws GeneralSecurityException {
        byte constant = result[0];
        if (constant != (byte) 5) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException();
        }

        byte[] secretKey = new byte[8];
        System.arraycopy(result, 1, secretKey, 0, 8);

        byte[] encryptedPassword = new byte[result.length - 9];
        System.arraycopy(result, 9, encryptedPassword, 0,
                encryptedPassword.length);

        byte[] iv = new byte[8];
        for (int i = 0; i < iv.length; i++) {
            iv[i] = 0;
        }

        Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("DES/CBC/PKCS5Padding");
        cipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, new SecretKeySpec(secretKey, "DES"),
                new IvParameterSpec(iv));
        return cipher.doFinal(encryptedPassword);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        if (args.length != 1) {
            System.err.println("Usage:  java Decrypt <password>");
            System.exit(1);
        }

        if (args[0].length() % 2 != 0) {
            System.err
                    .println("Password must consist of hex pairs.  Length is odd (not even).");
            System.exit(2);
        }

        byte[] secret = new byte[args[0].length() / 2];
        for (int i = 0; i < args[0].length(); i += 2) {
            String pair = args[0].substring(i, i + 2);
            secret[i / 2] = (byte) (Integer.parseInt(pair, 16));
        }

        try {
            System.out.println(new String(decryptPassword(secret)));
        } catch (GeneralSecurityException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
            System.exit(3);
        }
    }
}
  • 2
    Isn't that my answer with a main method? The article gives no credit. :( – Adam Paynter Jan 20 '11 at 13:55
  • ops! Sorry Adam, I didn't see that. So, thanks for your answer! – Topera Jan 27 '11 at 11:47
  • You don't have to be sorry at all. I am just a little saddened that my code was used without credit. – Adam Paynter Feb 24 '11 at 13:00
  • export xpath="//References/Reference/RefAddresses/StringRefAddr[@addrType='user' or @addrType='password']/Contents/text()" – Yordan Georgiev Oct 6 '14 at 7:48
  • Unfortunately this doesn’t work on SQL Developer 4.x anymore. – Jakub Jirutka Mar 9 '15 at 18:09
5

The same code as kornelissietsma has given, but written on java:

import oracle.jdevimpl.db.adapter.DatabaseProviderHelper;

class Decode {
    String pass = ""; 

    public Decode() {
        pass = DatabaseProviderHelper.comingIn("HASH");
        System.out.println(pass);
    }   

    public static void main(String[] args){
        new Decode();
    }   
}

Can be executed as following:

# javac -classpath .:/full/path/to/sqldeveloper/BC4J/lib/db-ca.jar:/full/path/to/sqldeveloper/jlib/ojmisc.jar sqldeveloper_hash_decode.java
# java -classpath .:/full/path/to/sqldeveloper/BC4J/lib/db-ca.jar:/full/path/to/sqldeveloper/jlib/ojmisc.jar Decode
5

Methods described in other answers unfortunately doesn’t work in SQL Developer 4.x. There’s extension that works on both 3.x and 4.x versions and it’s very easy to use:

https://github.com/tomecode/show-me-password-sqldev-jdev

  • This worked, thanks! – mattalxndr Jul 2 '15 at 23:23
4

I'm not sure about this but I always thought hashes can't be decrypted, only compared to another hash. MD5 generates a hash. The saved password in SQL Developer needs to be decrypted and send to the server. So the DES3Encrypt and DES3Decrypt procedures in dbms_obfuscation_toolkit package are a better bet. But the decrypt should be called before connecting to a database, so it's probably a Java crypto package with DES methods.

  • Thank you for the answer Robert! – Nano Taboada Jun 27 '09 at 17:45
4

Given solution is too old and only works with version 2.x but not now. because Oracle SQL Developer, changed the encryption algorithm in version 3.x and 4.x.

Version 3

Passwords are stored encrypted in the connections.xml file in those locations:

Windows: C:\Users\<USER>\AppData\Roaming\SQL Developer\system<VERSION>\o.jdeveloper.db.connection.<VERSION>\connections.xml
Linux: ~/.sqldeveloper/system<VERSION>/o.jdeveloper.db.connection.<VERSION>/connections.xml

Version 4

Passwords are stored encrypted in the aforementioned connections.xml file but the encryption key uses a machine-unique value db.system.id in the product-preferences.xml file accessible here:

Windows: C:\Users\<USER>\AppData\Roaming\SQL Developer\system<VERSION>\o.sqldeveloper.<VERSION>\product-preferences.xml
Linux: ~/.sqldeveloper/system<VERSION>/o.sqldeveloper.<VERSION>/product-preferences.xml

To decrypt latest encrypted file you can use Show me password extension for SQL Developer. Or decrypt file with SQL Developer password decryptor

2

Here's a python snippet if anyone is intersted. It's a translation of Adam Paynter's example above. It uses pyDes

import os
import pyDes

import binascii

if __name__ == '__main__':
    # Encrypt example
    zero = '\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0'
    key = os.urandom(8)
    plainText = 'open sesame'
    cipher = pyDes.des(key, mode=pyDes.CBC, IV=zero, padmode=pyDes.PAD_PKCS5)

    cipherText = '\5%s%s' % (key, cipher.encrypt(plainText))
    cipherHex = binascii.hexlify(cipherText)

    # This is what SQLDeveloper stores in XML
    print cipherHex

    # Decrypt above
    cipherText = binascii.unhexlify(cipherHex)
    assert cipherHex[0:2] == '05'
    key = cipherText[1:1+8]
    cipher = pyDes.des(key, mode=pyDes.CBC, IV=zero, padmode=pyDes.PAD_PKCS5)
    print cipher.decrypt(cipherText[1+8:])
1

I don't know, but I wouldn't be surprised if it was DBMS_OBFUSCATION_TOOLKIT being used something like this:

l_hash := dbms_obfuscation_toolkit.md5(input_string=>:username||:password);
  • Interesting Tony! Thanks much for the contribution! – Nano Taboada Jun 27 '09 at 17:46
  • 1
    I doubt that. To use the DBMS_OBFUSCATION_TOOLKIT, you must already be connected to the database. So how could the client log on to the database when it needs the database to retrieve the password?!? – Erich Kitzmueller Jun 24 '10 at 7:26
  • You got me there! – Tony Andrews Jun 24 '10 at 16:43
1

The length of the hash is 50 hex characters, which is 200 bits, so it may be the the hash of the password with a salt, prepended with the salt, like:

salt | hash(salt | password)

where | means concatenation.

Just speculation though. My guess would be a 40-bit salt and a SHA-1 hash, since SHA-1 produces 160-bit hashes.

Would be helpful to provide some input/output test data to check against!

  • Thanks for the comment Peter! The authentication data I've used for the example is simply "username" and "password". – Nano Taboada Jun 27 '09 at 17:28
-3

FYI the password 'apps_ro' encrypts as:

     <StringRefAddr addrType="password">
        <Contents>051DC8A88C574538CC4AEE32D326E9480659C06CEC271EA6D7</Contents>
     </StringRefAddr>
  • This does not answer the question. – Amit Chaurasia Dec 22 '16 at 14:58

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