199
Integer i = ...

switch (i){
    case null:
        doSomething0();
        break;    
    }

In the code above I cant use null in switch case statement. How can I do this differently? I can't use default because then I want to do something else.

  • 9
    before switch check for null condition if(i==null) {//dosomething} – Nagaraju Badaeni Apr 26 '12 at 11:09
  • 8
    This would actually make the switch useful. Other pattern matching languages work this way. – Pyrolistical Jun 24 '14 at 16:35

12 Answers 12

273

This is not possible with a switch statement in Java. Check for null before the switch:

if (i == null) {
    doSomething0();
} else {
    switch (i) {
    case 1:
        // ...
        break;
    }
}

You can't use arbitrary objects in switch statements*. The reason that the compiler doesn't complain about switch (i) where i is an Integer is because Java auto-unboxes the Integer to an int. As assylias already said, the unboxing will throw a NullPointerException when i is null.

* Since Java 7 you can use String in switch statements.

More about switch (including example with null variable) in Oracle Docs - Switch

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  • 16
    You can also use enums in switch statements. – joriki Mar 29 '13 at 18:23
  • 25
    It makes sense that you can't use a null Integer or other Wrapper class, because of unboxing. But what about enums and strings? Why can't they be null? – Luan Nico Nov 2 '13 at 11:20
  • 9
    I'm not understanding why a short circuit of null being mapped to the "default" case or a special case for a null switch was not implemented for Strings. It makes using switches to simplify code pointless since you always have to do a null check. I'm not saying simplification is the only use for switches though. – Reimius Jun 26 '14 at 18:36
  • 3
    @Reimius you don't always have to do a null check. If you respect the code contracts that you give to your methods, you can almost always manage to not have your code cluttered with null checks. Using asserts is always nice, though. – Joffrey May 18 '15 at 22:46
  • I'd also like to know the answer to @LuanNico's query. It seems unreasonable that null cannot be a valid case when working with String and enum types. Perhaps the enum implementation relies on calling ordinal() behind the scenes (though even so, why not treat null as having an 'ordinal' of -1?), and the String version does something using intern() and pointer-comparison (or otherwise relies upon something that strictly requires dereferencing an object)? – aroth Aug 10 '16 at 2:29
98
switch ((i != null) ? i : DEFAULT_VALUE) {
        //...
}
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  • cleaner way than using one extra if else – Vivek Agrawal Nov 15 '19 at 10:28
39

switch(i) will throw a NullPointerException if i is null, because it will try to unbox the Integer into an int. So case null, which happens to be illegal, would never have been reached anyway.

You need to check that i is not null before the switch statement.

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22

Java docs clearly stated that:

The prohibition against using null as a switch label prevents one from writing code that can never be executed. If the switch expression is of a reference type, such as a boxed primitive type or an enum, a run-time error will occur if the expression evaluates to null at run-time.

You must have to verify for null before Swithch statement execution.

if (i == null)

See The Switch Statement

case null: // will never be executed, therefore disallowed.
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14

Given:

public enum PersonType {
    COOL_GUY(1),
    JERK(2);

    private final int typeId;
    private PersonType(int typeId) {
        this.typeId = typeId;
    }

    public final int getTypeId() {
        return typeId;
    }

    public static PersonType findByTypeId(int typeId) {
        for (PersonType type : values()) {
            if (type.typeId == typeId) {
                return type;
            }
        }
        return null;
    }
}

For me, this typically aligns with a look-up table in a database (for rarely-updated tables only).

However, when I try to use findByTypeId in a switch statement (from, most likely, user input)...

int userInput = 3;
PersonType personType = PersonType.findByTypeId(userInput);
switch(personType) {
case COOL_GUY:
    // Do things only a cool guy would do.
    break;
case JERK:
    // Push back. Don't enable him.
    break;
default:
    // I don't know or care what to do with this mess.
}

...as others have stated, this results in an NPE @ switch(personType) {. One work-around (i.e., "solution") I started implementing was to add an UNKNOWN(-1) type.

public enum PersonType {
    UNKNOWN(-1),
    COOL_GUY(1),
    JERK(2);
    ...
    public static PersonType findByTypeId(int id) {
        ...
        return UNKNOWN;
    }
}

Now, you don't have to do null-checking where it counts and you can choose to, or not to, handle UNKNOWN types. (NOTE: -1 is an unlikely identifier in a business scenario, but obviously choose something that makes sense for your use-case).

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  • 2
    UNKNOWN is the best solution on this I've ever seen and overcomse nullchecks. – membersound Feb 26 '16 at 12:51
5

You have to make a

if (i == null) {
   doSomething0();
} else {
   switch (i) {
   }
}
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4

Some libraries attempt to offer alternatives to the builtin java switch statement. Vavr is one of them, they generalize it to pattern matching.

Here is an example from their documentation:

String s = Match(i).of(
    Case($(1), "one"),
    Case($(2), "two"),
    Case($(), "?")
);

You can use any predicate, but they offer many of them out of the box, and $(null) is perfectly legal. I find this a more elegant solution than the alternatives, but this requires java8 and a dependency on the vavr library...

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2

You can also use String.valueOf((Object) nullableString) like

switch (String.valueOf((Object) nullableString)) {
case "someCase"
    //...
    break;
...
case "null": // or default:
    //...
        break;
}

See interesting SO Q/A: Why does String.valueOf(null) throw a NullPointerException

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2
switch (String.valueOf(value)){
    case "null":
    default: 
}
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0

You can't. You can use primitives (int, char, short, byte) and String (Strings in java 7 only) in switch. primitives can't be null.
Check i in separate condition before switch.

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  • 3
    You can use enums too. – Karu Oct 21 '13 at 5:08
  • 5
    if the enum is null, you'll have the same problem. BTW, it's pretty strange that switch can't handle null, since it has a default clause – user1073494 Nov 12 '13 at 14:07
  • 1
    @LeonardoKenji Default clause doesn't really have anything to do with null; whatever you're switching on it'll be dereferenced in order to check any other cases, so the default clause won't handle the null case (a NullPointerException is thrown before it has a chance to). – Ben Mar 5 '14 at 2:59
  • 2
    I think he meant the default clause should handle null as any other possible enum value that was not caught by the previous case's – Leo Mar 6 '14 at 4:05
0

Just consider how the SWITCH might work,

  • in case of primitives we know it can fail with NPE for auto-boxing
  • but for String or enum, it might be invoking equals method, which obviously needs a LHS value on which equals is being invoked. So, given no method can be invoked on a null, switch cant handle null.
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0

Based on @tetsuo answer, with java 8 :

Integer i = ...

switch (Optional.ofNullable(i).orElse(DEFAULT_VALUE)) {
    case DEFAULT_VALUE:
        doDefault();
        break;    
}
|improve this answer|||||

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