55

Does anyone know if there is a way to use a variable in the setlevel() function of Python's Logging module?

At the moment I am using this:

Log = logging.getLogger('myLogger')
Log.setLevel(logging.DEBUG)

But I'd like to have this:

Log = logging.getLogger('myLogger')
levels = {'CRITICAL' : logging.critical,
    'ERROR' : logging.error,
    'WARNING' : logging.warning,
    'INFO' : logging.info,
    'DEBUG' : logging.debug
}
level = levels['INFO']
Log.setLevel(level)

But it doesn't seem to work - it just doesn't log anything.

I'm doing this so that I can set the logging level for a whole bunch of scripts from a variable in a single config file.

  • 13
    You should use uppercase in your dict values: ERROR: logging.ERROR etc – georg Apr 26 '12 at 11:54
  • I can't believe it was that simple! I'm embarrassed. – Jak Apr 26 '12 at 11:57
  • 1
    Also, Have a look at the logging documentation on this: docs.python.org/howto/logging.html#logging-levels. Logging levels are just numeric values. – Chris Apr 26 '12 at 12:00
117

You should also be able to do this:

Log = logging.getLogger('myLogger')
level = logging.getLevelName('INFO')
Log.setLevel(level)

The logging.getLevelName(lvl) function works both ways. I use it, it works (you should check your python implementation though).

This saves you the trouble to maintain your own dictionary, and reduces the possibility of typo errors.

  • This is really helpful. Thanks! – skytreader Jun 6 '14 at 6:22
  • 10
    quote: "In Python versions earlier than 3.4, this function could also be passed a text level, and would return the corresponding numeric value of the level. This undocumented behaviour was considered a mistake, and was removed in Python 3.4, but reinstated in 3.4.2 due to retain backward compatibility." – VPfB Feb 5 '16 at 14:27
8

I had problems with python 3 and got this working for me: https://docs.python.org/3/howto/logging.html

# myapp.py
import logging
import mylib

def main():
    logging.basicConfig(filename='myapp.log', level=logging.INFO)
    logging.info('Started')
    mylib.do_something()
    logging.info('Finished')

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()
6

logging.setLevel() takes an int or a str.

So the following works just fine (at least in Python 3.7):

logger = logging.getLogger(__name__)
logger.setLevel("DEBUG")
5

What about using getattr on logging module?

import logging
str_level = 'DEBUG'
level = getattr(logging, str_level)
logger = logging.getLogger("my_logger")
logger.setLevel(level)
print(logger.getEffectiveLevel())
1

I find that leveraging an optional environmental variable is very convenient and flexible:

class Foo():
    def __init__(self):
        self.logger = logging.getLogger(__name__)
        level = logging.getLevelName(os.environ.get('LOG_LEVEL', 'ERROR'))
        logging.basicConfig(level=level)

    def bar(self):
        self.logger.debug('Log something')
0

I was able to get this working below. I added a environment variable section as I am using this in a Docker but you can add it in as you see fit. This way you can select what you need and re-run your script.

#Manual Testing Variables If Needed
#os.environ["LOG_LEVEL_SELECTOR"] = "DEBUG, INFO, or ERROR"

#Setting Log Level Test
logger = logging.getLogger('json')
logger.addHandler(json_handler_out)
logger_levels = {
    'ERROR' : logging.ERROR,
    'INFO' : logging.INFO,
    'DEBUG' : logging.DEBUG
}
logger_level_selector = os.environ["LOG_LEVEL_SELECTOR"]
logger.setLevel(logger_level_selector)

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