96

How would I get the key name for the follow? E.g I want "button1" and "button2"?

var buttons = {
    button1: {
        text: 'Close',
        onclick: function(){

        }
    },
    button2: {
        text: 'Close2',
        onclick: function(){

        }
    }
}

var i;
for(i in buttons){
    if(buttons.hasOwnProperty(i)){
        alert(buttons[i].text);
    }
} 

I tried using .push() although this didn't work.

1
  • 9
    If your key names are actually button1, button2 and so on, you might want to make buttons an array
    – Zirak
    Apr 26, 2012 at 13:52

8 Answers 8

112

This might be better understood if you modified the wording up a bit:

var buttons = {
  foo: 'bar',
  fiz: 'buz'
};

for ( var property in buttons ) {
  console.log( property ); // Outputs: foo, fiz or fiz, foo
}

Note here that you're iterating over the properties of the object, using property as a reference to each during each subsequent cycle.

MSDN says of for ( variable in [object | array ] ) the following:

Before each iteration of a loop, variable is assigned the next property name of object or the next element index of array. You can then use it in any of the statements inside the loop to reference the property of object or the element of array.

Note also that the property order of an object is not constant, and can change, unlike the index order of an array. That might come in handy.

2
  • 2
    how would you get foo?
    – Demodave
    Jul 12, 2016 at 20:29
  • 3
    @Demodave To get the value of the foo property, you would simply call it off the buttons object: buttons.foo===buttons['foo']. From within the for loop, you'd call buttons[property]. Today you can also use Array.entries({foo:"bar",fizz:"buzz"}) to output [['foo':'bar'],['fizz','buzz']].
    – Sampson
    Jul 12, 2016 at 20:47
76

ECMAscript edition 5 also offers you the neat methods Object.keys() and Object.getOwnPropertyNames().

So

Object.keys( buttons );  // ['button1', 'button2'];
3
  • 4
    This gives all the keys as an array. How to get the key name of the specific key? Jun 7, 2019 at 5:46
  • 3
    I am trying this: Object.keys({myObj.fieldName})[0]; Jun 7, 2019 at 5:47
  • @ShajeelAfzal Good premise, but you can't use an indexing expression as a short-hand assignment in an object
    – sayandcode
    Feb 13, 2023 at 9:05
11

Change alert(buttons[i].text); to alert(i);

0
8

An ES6 update... though both filter and map might need customization.

Object.entries(theObj) returns a [[key, value],] array representation of an object that can be worked on using Javascript's array methods, .each(), .any(), .forEach(), .filter(), .map(), .reduce(), etc.

Saves a ton of work on iterating over parts of an object Object.keys(theObj), or Object.values() separately.

const buttons = {
    button1: {
        text: 'Close',
        onclick: function(){

        }
    },
    button2: {
        text: 'OK',
        onclick: function(){

        }
    },
    button3: {
        text: 'Cancel',
        onclick: function(){

        }
    }
}

list = Object.entries(buttons)
    .filter(([key, value]) => `${key}`[value] !== 'undefined' ) //has options
    .map(([key, value], idx) => `{${idx} {${key}: ${value}}}`)
    
console.log(list)

6

Variable i is your looking key name.

5

Here is a simple example, it will help you to get object key name.

var obj ={parts:{costPart:1000, salesPart: 2000}}; console.log(Object.keys(obj));

the output would be parts.

5

To retrieve key and value use the below.

 for (let property in buttons) {
    console.log('key:' + property, 'value:'+ buttons[property]);
 }

3

Assuming that you have access to Prototype, this could work. I wrote this code for myself just a few minutes ago; I only needed a single key at a time, so this isn't time efficient for big lists of key:value pairs or for spitting out multiple key names.

function key(int) {
    var j = -1;
    for(var i in this) {
        j++;
        if(j==int) {
            return i;
        } else {
            continue;
        }
    }
}
Object.prototype.key = key;

This is numbered to work the same way that arrays do, to save headaches. In the case of your code:

buttons.key(0) // Should result in "button1"
1
  • Editing the prototypes is almost always a really bad idea.
    – Sam
    Oct 28, 2020 at 23:36

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