86

Looking at the string class metadata, I only see the operators == and != overloaded. So how is it able to perform concatenation for the '+' operator?

Edit:

Some interesting notes from Eric Lippert on string concatenation:

Part 1

Part 2

There is also a super article from Joel referred in part 2 (http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/fog0000000319.html)

143

It doesn't - the C# compiler does :)

So this code:

string x = "hello";
string y = "there";
string z = "chaps";
string all = x + y + z;

actually gets compiled as:

string x = "hello";
string y = "there";
string z = "chaps";
string all = string.Concat(x, y, z);

(Gah - intervening edit removed other bits accidentally.)

The benefit of the C# compiler noticing that there are multiple string concatenations here is that you don't end up creating an intermediate string of x + y which then needs to be copied again as part of the concatenation of (x + y) and z. Instead, we get it all done in one go.

EDIT: Note that the compiler can't do anything if you concatenate in a loop. For example, this code:

string x = "";
foreach (string y in strings)
{
    x += y;
}

just ends up as equivalent to:

string x = "";
foreach (string y in strings)
{
    x = string.Concat(x, y);
}

... so this does generate a lot of garbage, and it's why you should use a StringBuilder for such cases. I have an article going into more details about the two which will hopefully answer further questions.

| improve this answer | |
  • 8
    Good answer; just a follow-up question: if you're concatenating strings inside a loop, how does the compiler work the .Concat operator when it can't know in advance what's going to be in the loop. – frenchie Apr 26 '12 at 20:49
  • Ah ok! And that's why it's better to use the StringBuilder for concatenations? – frenchie Apr 26 '12 at 20:52
  • 4
    @frenchie: That's why it's better to use StringBuilder for repeated concatenation... but why it's not worth it for concatenation of a fixed number of values. – Jon Skeet Apr 26 '12 at 20:53
  • @Jon-Skeet: thanks for the quick clarification...i should have checked in IL as well..and this is how int adds as well? by calling the Add method? – NoviceProgrammer Apr 26 '12 at 20:57
  • 2
    But note that nowadays the string.Concat and string.Join methods have many overloads, including some taking in an IEnumerable<> instance. So they are more convenient to use in most cases than to use a StringBuilder (I don't know if these methods use a StringBuilder internally, I just say that they are more convenient in most cases). – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jun 24 '13 at 21:55

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