47

Which is more correct? This:

@Override protected void onSaveInstanceState(Bundle outState) {
    super.onSaveInstanceState(outState);
    outState.putLong(ID, mId);
}

or this:

@Override protected void onSaveInstanceState(Bundle outState) {
    outState.putLong(ID, mId);
    super.onSaveInstanceState(outState);
}

They both work for me on my Gingerbread device and the Froyo and Ice Cream Sandwich emulators, and I've seen about as many examples saying one way as the other. Does it matter?

1 Answer 1

51

So long as your keys do not collide (e.g., ID being the same as something Android uses internally), the two are identical.

3
  • 3
    After debugging through Android code I can confirm this. It looks like Android doesn't attempt to save Bundle outState until after your onSaveInstanceState() method has been called. It therefore doesn't matter where in your method you call super.onSaveInstanceState(outState), as long as the keys don't collide. You could even call it in the middle of your method if you wanted!
    – snark
    Apr 26, 2017 at 20:42
  • @snark what are the reserved keys? Jun 2, 2020 at 10:59
  • 1
    @SaiprasadPrabhu: None are documented, and I do not recall every running into a problem with this. I was more nervous about this eight years ago. :-) Jun 2, 2020 at 11:01

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