In MySQL, we can execute this where it updates the column changetimestamp every time the row is changed:

create table ab (
  id int, 
  changetimestamp timestamp 
    NOT NULL 
    default CURRENT_TIMESTAMP 
    on update CURRENT_TIMESTAMP 
);

Is there something similar to do the above in PostgreSQL?

  • afaik not as easy in PostgreSQL where you need a trigger: pointbeing.net/weblog/2008/03/… – bernie Jun 24 '09 at 0:58
  • 2
    It's worth noting that MySQL has a number of "special treatments" for timestamp columns depending on version and settings, which (fortunately!) cannot be reproduced in Postgres. Like allowing 0 for a timestamp column or transforming NULL into the current timestamp on input in certain constellations. Be sure to study the manual of both RDBMS to be aware of subtle differences: MySQL and Postgres. – Erwin Brandstetter Oct 24 '14 at 0:57
  • @ErwinBrandstetter is the answer provided below still the best practice for autoupdating timestamps on 2018? – commonSenseCode Aug 25 at 16:30

Create a function that updates the changetimestamp column of a table like so:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION update_changetimestamp_column()
RETURNS TRIGGER AS $$
BEGIN
   NEW.changetimestamp = now(); 
   RETURN NEW;
END;
$$ language 'plpgsql';

Create a trigger on the table that calls the update_changetimestamp_column() function whenever an update occurs like so:

    CREATE TRIGGER update_ab_changetimestamp BEFORE UPDATE
    ON ab FOR EACH ROW EXECUTE PROCEDURE 
    update_changetimestamp_column();
  • So, there is no other way of doing what I want except through a trigger? Because I would like to implement 'on update timestamp' for all of my tables possibly 300+. And I'm thinking that creating triggers might cause some performance issues. – bichonfrise74 Jun 24 '09 at 1:10
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    As far as I know this is the standard way to do this in postgresql. When you write "on update current_timestamp" in mysql, it creates a trigger on the table in the background. The difference is that you're writing the trigger here manually instead of having it written for you. – Charles Ma Jun 24 '09 at 1:38
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    There is practically no performance penalty - at least in any sensible database. – user80168 Jun 24 '09 at 7:44
  • 3
    Is there a way to give the column name that need to be updated as parameter to the function update_changetimestamp_column? – Antoan Milkov Oct 2 '14 at 7:14
  • 3
    @womble It would likely be very useful to post an example of this. If I manage how to dynamically specify which column to update, I'll write it as an answer. – MirroredFate Feb 23 '16 at 19:37

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