I am having problems adding all the elements of an array as well as averaging them out. How would I do this and implement it with the code I currently have? The elements are supposed to be defined as I have it below.

<script type="text/javascript">
//<![CDATA[

var i;
var elmt = new Array();

elmt[0] = "0";
elmt[1] = "1";
elmt[2] = "2";
elmt[3] = "3";
elmt[4] = "4";
elmt[5] = "7";
elmt[6] = "8";
elmt[7] = "9";
elmt[8] = "10";
elmt[9] = "11";

// problem here
for (i = 9; i < 10; i++)
{
    document.write("The sum of all the elements is: " + /* problem here */ + " The average of all the elements is: " + /* problem here */ + "<br/>");
}   

//]]>
</script>
  • 9
    var elmt = [ 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11] would be so much nicer. – James McLaughlin Jun 23 '15 at 10:06
  • 31
    I'm sorry but this homework question is terrible. It uses document.write, it shows no research on the part of the author, and yet it has 23 upvotes? – Dan Dascalescu Sep 14 '15 at 22:11
  • 3
    @DanDascalescu It addresses a question that a lot of people have asked. It doesn't mean the question is a good one. – Conor O'Brien Jan 6 '16 at 23:13
  • 5
    @DanDascalescu - Don't forget the awkward array construction and the needless for loop. I wonder if those were intentional obfuscations by the professor. In fact, I hope so. – Justin Morgan Apr 11 '17 at 15:45

30 Answers 30

up vote 100 down vote accepted
var sum = 0;
for( var i = 0; i < elmt.length; i++ ){
    sum += parseInt( elmt[i], 10 ); //don't forget to add the base
}

var avg = sum/elmt.length;

document.write( "The sum of all the elements is: " + sum + " The average is: " + avg );

Just iterate through the array, since your values are strings, they have to be converted to an integer first. And average is just the sum of values divided by the number of values.

  • 12
    The only improvement I'd do would be to replace for(var i = 0; i < elmt.length; i++;) with for(var i = 0, l = elmt.length; i < l; i++) – Dan D. Apr 28 '12 at 1:56
  • 2
    not to be that guy or to be off topic but it's a good practice to include the radix argument in parseInt(). By that I mean sum += parseInt(elmt[i], 10); assuming elmt[i] is of the base 10. link – Ryder Brooks Apr 1 '14 at 18:27
  • 6
    Watch out for divisions by 0 (elmt.length might me 0) – caulitomaz Jan 11 '15 at 20:42
  • 2
    @BramVanroy Short story: No, it does not set 'l' every single time. Long story: DanD's solution is to improve the performance/speed, because checking the length of an array every single iteration is slower than actually storing the length in a local variable and referencing it each iteration. – CatalinBerta Dec 31 '15 at 17:22
  • 7
    @VitoGentile and DanD uglifying the code for performance gains which modern Browsers compile away anyway should not be best practice. – nauti Aug 10 '16 at 12:00

A solution I consider more elegant:

var sum, avg = 0;

// dividing by 0 will return Infinity
// arr must contain at least 1 element to use reduce
if (arr.length)
{
    sum = arr.reduce(function(a, b) { return a + b; });
    avg = sum / arr.length;
}

document.write("The sum is: " + sum + ". The average is: " + avg + "<br/>");
  • 81
    elegant !== fast. Array.prototype.reduce requires the execution of a function on each iteration which is far slower (orders of magnitude) than running a simple loop. jsperf.com/speedy-summer-upper – furf May 7 '13 at 18:47
  • 10
    with a cumulative moving average, you could do this all within the reduce function (no need for the sum/times.length step): var avg = times.reduce(function(p,c,i){return p+(c-p)/(i+1)},0); – zamnuts Aug 9 '14 at 8:45
  • 6
    @zamnuts I'm with you, I think Thor84no comment's totally out of order - I'd be happy to be fired from a place which finds array.reduce too complex. However I wouldn't use your code either, for the simple fact it has a division and two extra additions at ever step, which is never going to be as efficient as a single division at the end – gotofritz Apr 1 '16 at 14:58
  • 8
    In ES2015 it's quite a bit more elegant. times.reduce((a,b) => (a+b)) / times.length; – Ray Foss Sep 29 '16 at 16:27
  • 7
    @furf 5 years later, it looks like in many modern browsers, the more elegant "reduce()" is faster (or as fast). In Chrome 65 and most firefox reduce is better on that test. – Sir Robert Mar 27 at 14:43

ES6

const average = arr => arr.reduce( ( p, c ) => p + c, 0 ) / arr.length;
    
const result = average( [ 4, 4, 5, 6, 6 ] ); // 5
    
console.log(result);

  • 1
    Improved: Array.prototype.average = function () { var sum = 0, j = 0; for (var i = 0; i < this.length, isFinite(this[i]); i++) { sum += parseFloat(this[i]); ++j; } return j ? sum / j : 0; }; – Gilad Peleg Oct 7 '13 at 12:52
  • 24
    Please, don't extend objects that aren't created by your code. – Brad Nov 6 '13 at 1:08
  • 2
    @Brad : be honest please – Abdennour TOUMI Nov 6 '13 at 8:08
  • 1
    UPDATE doesnt work for: ["RER","4","3re",5,new Object()].average(); returns 0 instead of expected 4.5 – Luckylooke Mar 6 '14 at 14:57
  • 3
    And this will epically crash when there is no length – Jimmy Kane Jun 22 '17 at 11:26

generally average using one-liner reduce is like this

elements.reduce(function(sum, a,i,ar) { sum += a;  return i==ar.length-1?(ar.length==0?0:sum/ar.length):sum},0);

specifically to question asked

elements.reduce(function(sum, a,i,ar) { sum += parseFloat(a);  return i==ar.length-1?(ar.length==0?0:sum/ar.length):sum},0);

an efficient version is like

elements.reduce(function(sum, a) { return sum + a },0)/(elements.length||1);

Understand Javascript Array Reduce in 1 Minute http://www.airpair.com/javascript/javascript-array-reduce

as gotofritz pointed out seems Array.reduce skips undefined values. so here is a fix:

(function average(arr){var finalstate=arr.reduce(function(state,a) { state.sum+=a;state.count+=1; return state },{sum:0,count:0}); return finalstate.sum/finalstate.count})([2,,,6])
  • 2
    elements.length!=0?elements.length:1 can also be written like this : elements.length || 1 which is shorter, and easier to read. – 4rzael Oct 28 '15 at 11:30
  • 2
    Bear in mind this only works for arrays with no empty gaps – gotofritz Apr 1 '16 at 15:03
  • 1
    Suggestion: Add unminified (actually just pretty-printed) versions of your code snippets so people can read them. I'd edit them in myself, but I don't like to change people's answers to that extent. – Justin Morgan Apr 11 '17 at 15:50

Let's imagine we have an array of integers like this:

var values = [ 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11];

The average is obtained with the following formula

A= (1/n)Σxi ( with i = 1 to n ) ... So: x1/n + x2/n + ... + xn/n

We divide the current value by the number of values and add the previous result to the returned value.

The reduce method signature is

reduce(callback[,default_previous_value])

The reduce callback function takes the following parameters:

  • p : Result of the previous calculation
  • c : Current value (from the current index)
  • i : Current array element's index value
  • a : The current reduced Array

The second reduce's parameter is the default value ... (Used in case the array is empty ).

So the average reduce method will be:

var avg = values.reduce(function(p,c,i,a){return p + (c/a.length)},0);

If you prefer you can create a separate function

function average(p,c,i,a){return p + (c/a.length)};
function sum(p,c){return p + c)};

And then simply refer to the callback method signature

var avg = values.reduce(average,0);
var sum= values.reduce(sum,0);

Or Augment the Array prototype directly..

Array.prototype.sum = Array.prototype.sum || function (){
  return this.reduce(function(p,c){return p+c},0);
};

It's possible to divide the value each time the reduce method is called..

Array.prototype.avg = Array.prototype.avg || function () {
  return this.reduce(function(p,c,i,a){return p+(c/a.length)},0);
};

Or even better , using the previously defined Array.protoype.sum()

method, optimize the process my calling the division only once :)

Array.prototype.avg = Array.prototype.avg || function () {
  return this.sum()/this.length; 
};

Then on any Array object of the scope:

[2, 6].avg();// -> 4
[2, 6].sum();// -> 8

NB: an empty array with return a NaN wish is more correct than 0 in my point of view and can be useful in specific use cases.

Not the fastest, but the shortest and in one line is using map() & reduce():

var average = [7,14,21].map(function(x,i,arr){return x/arr.length}).reduce(function(a,b){return a + b})
  • 1
    maybe shorter [7,14,21].reduce((avg,e,i,arr)=>avg+e/arr.length,0); but with different behaviour on empty array. If you do want the outcome to be empty on empty array: [].reduce((a,e,i,arr)=>(a?a:0)+e/arr.length,"") – Valen Jun 3 '17 at 11:53
  • I hope this isn't considered good code. – Tobiq Sep 18 '17 at 15:44
  • @Tobiq map & reduce are pretty standard since ES5 (standardized in 2009) – Johann Echavarria Sep 19 '17 at 15:44
  • for (var avg = 0, length = i = arr.length; i--;) avg += arr[i] / length Much clearer, shorter and much faster – Tobiq Sep 19 '17 at 17:15
  • 1
    @Tobiq, your code is anything but clear. This type of loop is unintelligible at first glance. – Porkopek May 1 at 10:19

You can also use lodash, _.sum(array) and _.mean(array) in Math part (also have other convenient staff).

_.sum([4, 2, 8, 6]);
// => 20
_.mean([4, 2, 8, 6]);
// => 5

I use these methods in my personal library:

Array.prototype.sum = Array.prototype.sum || function() {
  return this.reduce(function(sum, a) { return sum + Number(a) }, 0);
}

Array.prototype.average = Array.prototype.average || function() {
  return this.sum() / (this.length || 1);
}

EDIT: To use them, simply ask the array for its sum or average, like:

[1,2,3].sum() // = 6
[1,2,3].average() // = 2
  • Neat implementation althought I would have implemented sum to use a for loop instead of reduce. Still very cleanly coded though. – XDS Aug 23 '16 at 9:46

One sneaky way you could do it although it does require the use of (the much hated) eval().

var sum = eval(elmt.join('+')), avg = sum / elmt.length;
document.write("The sum of all the elements is: " + sum + " The average of all the elements is: " + avg + "<br/>");

Just thought I'd post this as one of those 'outside the box' options. You never know, the slyness might grant you (or taketh away) a point.

  • +1 Nice efficient one-liner! If it's client-side in-browser Javascript, the only possible eval() issue I can see is that you need to be sure the array contains numbers only (which of course is also true for all other answers here). Non-numeric entries crash with a ReferenceError or SyntaxError, except nested arrays of numbers which introduce ,` causing an incorrect numeric total. And of course in server side JS, e.g. node.js, then naturally eval() might introduce security issues. But this looks perfect for any well-structured client-side uses. – user568458 Dec 3 '13 at 13:08
  • 1
    Actually there's maybe a performance issue to including eval() like this - see the performance section of nczonline.net/blog/2013/06/25/eval-isnt-evil-just-misunderstood – user568458 Dec 4 '13 at 11:57

In ES6-ready browsers this polyfill may be helpful.

Math.sum = (...a) => Array.prototype.reduce.call(a,(a,b) => a+b)

Math.avg = (...a) => this.sum(...a)/a.length;

You can share same call method between Math.sum,Math.avg and Math.max,such as

var maxOne = Math.max(1,2,3,4) // 4;

you can use Math.sum as

var sumNum = Math.sum(1,2,3,4) // 10

or if you have an array to sum up,you can use

var sumNum = Math.sum.apply(null,[1,2,3,4]) // 10

just like

var maxOne = Math.max.apply(null,[1,2,3,4]) // 4
  • Instead of adding methods to Array.prototype,I think adding theme to Math object is a better choice - they are all "number handlers". – Oboo Chin Nov 18 '16 at 15:59

Here is a quick addition to the “Math” object in javascript to add a “average” command to it!!

Math.average = function(input) {
  this.output = 0;
  for (this.i = 0; this.i < input.length; this.i++) {
    this.output+=Number(input[this.i]);
  }
  return this.output/input.length;
}

Then i have this addition to the “Math” object for getting the sum!

Math.sum = function(input) {
  this.output = 0;
  for (this.i = 0; this.i < input.length; this.i++) {
    this.output+=Number(input[this.i]);
  }
  return this.output;
}

So then all you do is

alert(Math.sum([5,5,5])); //alerts “15”
alert(Math.average([10,0,5])); //alerts “5”

And where i put the placeholder array just pass in your variable (The input if they are numbers can be a string because of it parsing to a number!)

Calculating average (mean) using reduce and ES6:

const average = list => list.reduce((prev, curr) => prev + curr) / list.length;

const list = [0, 10, 20, 30]
average(list) // 15

set your for loop counter to 0.... you're getting element 9 and then you're done as you have it now. The other answers are basic math. Use a variable to store your sum (need to cast the strings to ints), and divide by your array length.

Start by defining all of the variables we plan on using. You'll note that for the numbers array, I'm using the literal notation of [] as opposed to the constructor method array(). Additionally, I'm using a shorter method to set multiple variables to 0.

var numbers = [], count = sum = avg = 0;

Next I'm populating my empty numbers array with the values 0 through 11. This is to get me to your original starting point. Note how I'm pushing onto the array count++. This pushing the current value of count, and then increments it for the next time around.

while ( count < 12 )
    numbers.push( count++ );

Lastly, I'm performing a function "for each" of the numbers in the numbers array. This function will handle one number at a time, which I'm identifying as "n" within the function body.

numbers.forEach(function(n){
  sum += n; 
  avg = sum / numbers.length;
});

In the end, we can output both the sum value, and the avg value to our console in order to see the result:

// Sum: 66, Avg: 5.5
console.log( 'Sum: ' + sum + ', Avg: ' + avg );

See it in action online at http://jsbin.com/unukoj/3/edit

  • 1
    This is PHP and he's using JavaScript :> – Jack Apr 28 '12 at 1:58
  • @Jack That was embarrassing ;) Thanks for pointing it out though. – Sampson Apr 28 '12 at 2:15
  • np, we all have our moments! – Jack Apr 28 '12 at 2:20

I am just building on Abdennour TOUMI's answer. here are the reasons why:

1.) I agree with Brad, I do not think it is a good idea to extend object that we did not create.

2.) array.length is exactly reliable in javascript, I prefer Array.reduce beacuse a=[1,3];a[1000]=5; , now a.length would return 1001.

function getAverage(arry){
    // check if array
    if(!(Object.prototype.toString.call(arry) === '[object Array]')){
        return 0;
    }
    var sum = 0, count = 0; 
    sum = arry.reduce(function(previousValue, currentValue, index, array) {
        if(isFinite(currentValue)){
            count++;
            return previousValue+ parseFloat(currentValue);
        }
        return previousValue;
    }, sum);
    return count ? sum / count : 0; 
};

On evergreen browsers you can use arrow functions avg = [1,2,3].reduce((a,b) => (a+b);

Running it 100,000 times, the time difference between the for loop approach and reduce is negligible.

s=Date.now();for(i=0;i<100000;i++){ n=[1,2,3]; a=n.reduce((a,b) => (a+b)) / n.length };
console.log("100k reduce took " + (Date.now()-s) + "ms.");

s=Date.now();for(i=0;i<100000;i++){n=[1,2,3]; nl=n.length; a=0; for(j=nl-1;j>0;j--){a=a+n[j];} a/nl };
console.log("100k for loop took " + (Date.now()-s) + "ms.");

s=Date.now();for(i=0;i<1000000;i++){n=[1,2,3]; nl=n.length; a=0; for(j=nl-1;j>0;j--){a=a+n[j];} a/nl };
console.log("1M for loop took " + (Date.now()-s) + "ms.");

s=Date.now();for(i=0;i<1000000;i++){ n=[1,2,3]; a=n.reduce((a,b) => (a+b)) / n.length };
console.log("1M reduce took " + (Date.now()-s) + "ms.");

/* 
 * RESULT on Chrome 51
 * 100k reduce took 26ms.
 * 100k for loop took 35ms.
 * 10M for loop took 126ms.
 * 10M reduce took 209ms.
 */

  • 1
    You need to learn more about console.time & console.timeEnd – Abdennour TOUMI Oct 4 '16 at 21:07
  • @AbdennourTOUMI Thanks for the tip, I'll keep it in mind... however it's non standard and not on standards track. developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Console/timeEnd – Ray Foss Oct 6 '16 at 18:48
  • 1
    I know I'm veering off the original questions but how about using performance.now() for performance measurements? – deejbee Nov 2 '16 at 8:31
  • @deejbee That does offer floating point accuracy... but it's also a tad more verbose and less compatible. Setting markers with it would be useful in real world code – Ray Foss Nov 2 '16 at 12:40

Just for kicks:

var elmt = [0, 1, 2,3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11], l = elmt.length, i = -1, sum = 0;
for (; ++i < l; sum += elmt[i])
    ;
document.body.appendChild(document.createTextNode('The sum of all the elements is: ' + sum + ' The average of all the elements is: ' + (sum / l)));
Array.prototype.avg=function(fn){
    fn =fn || function(e,i){return e};
    return (this.map(fn).reduce(function(a,b){return parseFloat(a)+parseFloat(b)},0) / this.length ) ; 
};

Then :

[ 1 , 2 , 3].avg() ;  //-> OUT : 2

[{age:25},{age:26},{age:27}].avg(function(e){return e.age}); // OUT : 26
protected void Submit_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    foreach (ComputerLabReservationList row in db.ComputerLabReservationLists)
    {
        if (row.LabNo == lblLabNo.Text && row.ReservationDate == StartCld.Text && row.StartEndTime == ddlstartendtime.Text)
        {
            // string display = "This time have been reserved by others. Please reserve again.";
            // ClientScript.RegisterStartupScript(this.GetType(), "yourMessage", "alert('" + display + "');", true);
            ScriptManager.RegisterStartupScript(this, this.GetType(),
            "alert",
            "alert('This time already booked by other. Please insert another time');window.location ='Computerlabs.aspx';",
                  true);
        }
        else
        {
            ComputerLabReservationList crl = new ComputerLabReservationList()
            {
                ResvId = lblreservationid.Text,
                LabNo = lblLabNo.Text,
                LecturerId = lblLecturerID.Text,
                ReservationDate = StartCld.Text,
                StartEndTime = ddlstartendtime.Text
            };
            db.ComputerLabReservationLists.InsertOnSubmit(crl);
            db.SubmitChanges();
            ScriptManager.RegisterStartupScript(this, this.GetType(),
            "alert",
            "alert('Your Reservation was sucessfully');window.location ='MyComputerReservation.aspx';",
            true);                    
        }
    }
}
  • 1
    Javascript, not java – bfred.it Oct 4 '16 at 9:55
  • Not only that. It's doesn't calculate the sum and average. – Annan Jun 7 at 6:57

I think we can do like

var k=elmt.reduce(function(a,b){return parseFloat(a+parseFloat(b));})
var avg=k/elmt.length; 
console.log(avg);

I am using parseFloat twice because when 1) you add (a)9+b("1") number then result will be "91" but we want addition. so i used parseFloat

2)When addition of (a)9+parseFloat("1") happen though result will be "10" but it will be in string which we don't want so again i used parseFloat.

I hope i am clear. Suggestions are welcome

Here is my rookie way of simply finding the avg. Hope this helps somebody.

function numAvg(num){
    var total = 0;
    for(var i = 0;i < num.length; i++) { 
        total+=num[i];
    }
    return total/num.length;
}

here's your one liner:

var average = arr.reduce((sum,item,index,arr)=>index !== arr.length-1?sum+item:sum+item/arr.length,0)

I think this may be a direct solution to calculate the average with a for loop and function.

var elmts = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11];

function average(arr) {
    var total = 0;
    for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
        total += arr[i];
    }
        console.log(Math.round(total/arr.length));
}

average(elmts);

There seem to be an endless number of solutions for this but I found this to be concise and elegant.

const numbers = [1,2,3,4];
const count = numbers.length;
const reducer = (adder, value) => (adder + value);
const average = numbers.map(x => x/count).reduce(reducer);
console.log(average); // 2.5

Or more consisely:

const numbers = [1,2,3,4];
const average = numbers.map(x => x/numbers.length).reduce((adder, value) => (adder + value));
console.log(average); // 2.5

Depending on your browser you may need to do explicit function calls because arrow functions are not supported:

const r = function (adder, value) {
        return adder + value;
};
const m = function (x) {
        return x/count;
};
const average = numbers.map(m).reduce(r);
console.log(average); // 2.5

Or:

const average1 = numbers
    .map(function (x) {
        return x/count;
     })
    .reduce(function (adder, value) {
        return adder + value;
});
console.log(average1);
  • You are making N divisions in map function. It is better to first reduce all numbers to a total value and then make only one division – Eugenio May 24 at 13:03

If you are in need of the average and can skip the requirement of calculating the sum, you can compute the average with a single call of reduce:

// Assumes an array with only values that can be parsed to a Float
var reducer = function(cumulativeAverage, currentValue, currentIndex) {
  // 1. multiply average by currentIndex to find cumulative sum of previous elements
  // 2. add currentValue to get cumulative sum, including current element
  // 3. divide by total number of elements, including current element (zero-based index + 1)
  return (cumulativeAverage * currentIndex + parseFloat(currentValue))/(currentIndex + 1)
}
console.log([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10].reduce(reducer, 0)); // => 5.5
console.log([].reduce(reducer, 0)); // => 0
console.log([0].reduce(reducer, 0)); // => 0
console.log([].reduce(reducer, 0)); // => 0
console.log([,,,].reduce(reducer, 0)); // => 0
console.log([].reduce(reducer, 0)); // => 0

If anyone ever needs it - Here is a recursive average.

In the context of the original question, you may want to use the recursive average if you allowed the user to insert additional values and, without incurring the cost of visiting each element again, wanted to "update" the existing average.

/**
 * Computes the recursive average of an indefinite set
 * @param {Iterable<number>} set iterable sequence to average
 * @param {number} initAvg initial average value
 * @param {number} initCount initial average count
 */
function average(set, initAvg, initCount) {
  if (!set || !set[Symbol.iterator])
    throw Error("must pass an iterable sequence");

  let avg = initAvg || 0;
  let avgCnt = initCount || 0;
  for (let x of set) {
    avgCnt += 1;
    avg = avg * ((avgCnt - 1) / avgCnt) + x / avgCnt;
  }
  return avg; // or {avg: avg, count: avgCnt};
}

average([2, 4, 6]);    //returns 4
average([4, 6], 2, 1); //returns 4
average([6], 3, 2);    //returns 4
average({
  *[Symbol.iterator]() {
    yield 2; yield 4; yield 6;
  }
});                    //returns 4

How:

this works by maintaining the current average and element count. When a new value is to be included you increment count by 1, scale the existing average by (count-1) / count, and add newValue / count to the average.

Benefits:

  • you don't sum all the elements, which may result in large number that cannot be stored in a 64-bit float.
  • you can "update" an existing average if additional values become available.
  • you can perform a rolling average without knowing the sequence length.

Downsides:

  • incurs lots more divisions
  • not infinite - limited to Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER items unless you employ BigNumber

Average of HTML content itens

With jQuery or Javascript's querySelector you have direct acess to formated data... Example:

<p>Elements for an average: <span class="m">2</span>, <span class="m">4</span>,
   <span class="m">2</span>, <span class="m">3</span>.
</p>

So, with jQuery you have

var A = $('.m')
  .map(function(idx) { return  parseInt($(this).html()) })
  .get();
var AVG = A.reduce(function(a,b){return a+b}) / A5.length;

See other more 4 ways (!) to access itens and average it: http://jsfiddle.net/4fLWB/

  • 1
    Downvote because the OP asked to to do X and you told him how to do Y then X. Also, the idea of pulling data from the DOM rather than creating the DOM from data seems like something you'd probably want to avoid anyways. – eremzeit Jan 7 '16 at 18:08
  • Hi @eremzeit, thanks attention. I use bold title to say "it is other case, with contents into HTML", please considere it... About relevante, this kind of use (direct access of data from HTML that user see) is not an academic game... It is about the "auditable truth", that is into HTML (!), not "hidden from humans" at javascript... Not only at Wikipedia, see typical cases: 3.7 million scientific articles at PMC, 6.6 MILLION of legislative documents at LexML. Some people not do only design and games with js, do tools for audit. – Peter Krauss Jan 7 '16 at 18:37

var arr = [1,2,3,4,5]

function avg(arr){
  var sum = 0;
  for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
    sum += parseFloat(arr[i])
  }
  return sum / i;
}

avg(arr) ======>>>> 3

This works with strings as numbers or numbers in the array.

  • Some explanation of your answer is in order. – David Hoelzer Dec 16 '15 at 1:35
  • You're right: defined sum as a number so that this works now. Feed the function an array and it spits out the average of the array. – dan chow Dec 17 '15 at 3:21

I would recommend D3 in this case. It is the most readable (and provides 2 different kinds of averages)

let d3 = require('d3');
let array = [1,2,3,4];
let sum = d3.sum(array); //10
let mean = d3.mean(array); //2.5
let median = d3.median(array); 
  • 2
    Gosh adding the whole D3 just for working out an average is ridiculous – gotofritz Apr 1 '16 at 15:02

I had exactly 10 elements (like in the example) so I did:

( elmt[0] + elmt[1] + elmt[2] + elmt[3] + elmt[4] +
  elmt[5] + elmt[6] + elmt[7] + elmt[8] + elmt[9] ) / 10

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