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I found the following in some old and bad documented C code:

#define addr (((((147 << 8) | 87) << 8) | 117) << 8) | 107

What is it? Well I know it's an IP address - and shifting 8 bits to the left makes some sense too. But can anyone explain this to me as a whole? What is happening there?

Thank you!

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  • Whenever you see << 8, mentally replace it with * 256, which is exactly what it means whenever its result is well-defined. Then see if what's going on makes sense to you. Apr 28, 2012 at 12:24
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    If you understand the fact that it's shifting things by 8 bits at a time, what else is there to understand? Apr 28, 2012 at 12:28
  • But why do it like this in the first place? Why shift the bytes and then do a bitwise or? The whole idea doesn't make sense to me.
    – Dänu
    Apr 28, 2012 at 12:31
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    Well, doing it this way lets you see the individual octets in decimal, which you wouldn't get if it said e.g. 0x9357756B, and stores it efficiently in a single integer evaluated at compile time, which it wouldn't if e.g. it were in string form "147.87.117.107". It doesn't seem particularly insane to me. Apr 28, 2012 at 12:41
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    Incidentally, presumably the = is a typo. Apr 28, 2012 at 12:42

2 Answers 2

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The code

(((((147 << 8) | 87) << 8) | 117) << 8) | 107

generates 4 bytes containing the IP 147.87.117.107. The first step is the innermost bracket:

147<<8
147 = 1001 0011
1001 0011 << 8 = 1001 0011 0000 0000

The second byte 87 is inserted by bitwise-or operation on (147<<8). As you can see, the 8 bits on the right are all 0 (due to <<8), so the bitwise-or operation just inserts the 8 bits from 87:

1001 0011 0000 0000  (147<<8)
0000 0000 0101 0111  (87)
-------------------  bitwise-or
1001 0011 0101 0111  (147<<8)|87

The same is done with rest so you have 4 bytes at the end saved into a single 32-bit integer.

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An IPv4 address consists of four bytes, which means it can be stored in a 32-bit integer. This is taking the four parts of the IP address (147.87.117.107) and using bit-shifting and the bit-wise OR operator to "encode" the address in a single 4-byte quantity.

(Note: the address might be 107.117.87.147 - I can't remember offhand what order the bytes are stored in.)

The (hex) bytes of the resulting quantity look like:

aabb ccdd

Where aa is the hex representation of 147 (0x93), bb is 87 (0x57), cc is 117 (0x75), and dd is 107 (0x6b), so the resulting value is 9357756b.

Update: None of this applies to IPv6, since an IPv6 address is 128 bits instead of 32.

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