95

I would like to run multiple insert statements on multiple tables. I am using dapper.net. I don't see any way to handle transactions with dapper.net.

Please share your ideas on how to use transactions with dapper.net.

92

Here the code snippet:

using System.Transactions;    
....    
using (var transactionScope = new TransactionScope())
{
    DoYourDapperWork();
    transactionScope.Complete();
}

Note that you need to add reference to System.Transactions assembly because it is not referenced by default.

  • 4
    Is it necessary to explicitly roll back on error or does System.Transactions handle that automatically? – Norbert Norbertson Oct 3 '17 at 12:30
  • 3
    @NorbertNorbertson it does it automatically, in Dispose() method. If Complete() has not been called, transaction gets rolled back. – the_joric Oct 4 '17 at 8:58
  • 4
    Worth to mention because of another answer (stackoverflow.com/a/20047975/47672): connection must be opened inside of TransctionScope using block in case you choose this answer. – 0x49D1 Jun 8 '18 at 12:00
  • 2
    See also (stackoverflow.com/a/20047975/444469) - DoYouDapperWork (Execute, Query, etc...) needs the transaction in the parameters. – Matthieu Jul 18 '18 at 18:03
  • Is the rollback called automatically if there is a problem? – Pliskin Mar 8 at 16:18
87

I preferred to use a more intuitive approach by getting the transaction directly from the connection:

// This called method will get a connection, and open it if it's not yet open.
using (var connection = GetOpenConnection())
using (var transaction = connection.BeginTransaction())
{
    connection.Execute(
        "INSERT INTO data(Foo, Bar) values (@Foo, @Bar);", listOf5000Items, transaction);
    transaction.Commit();
}
  • @ANeves: Well, we're probably using different Dapper frameworks, because this one has: github.com/StackExchange/dapper-dot-net – andrecarlucci Nov 28 '14 at 18:28
  • 22
    have to call connection.open() before .begintransaction – Timeless Jun 5 '15 at 9:09
  • A connection is not automatically enlisted in transactionscope unless you open the connection within the transactionscope. I don't know how your code works, if GetOpenConnection somehow magically opens itself within the transactionscope, but I'd wager that it doesn't – Erik Bergstedt Nov 22 '15 at 9:23
  • @ErikBergstedt, are you saying that the connection must be open only after we call .BeginTransaction() on it? If that was the case, this extension method would promote wrong usage of the transaction. (IMO, it should even throw "cannot open transaction after the connection is already open".) – ANeves Nov 23 '15 at 16:22
  • 1
    Good point to include the transaction as a parameter in Execute, as this is required. – Arve Systad Jun 14 '17 at 11:47
18

You should be able to use TransactionScope since Dapper runs just ADO.NET commands.

using (var scope = new TransactionScope())
{
   // insert
   // insert
   scope.Complete();
}
6

Considering all your tables are in single database, I disagree with TransactionScope solution suggested in some answers here. Refer this answer.

  1. TransactionScope is generally used for distributed transactions; transaction spanning different databases may be on different system. This needs some configurations on operating system and SQL Server without which this will not work. This is not recommended if all your queries are against single instance of database.
    But, with single database this may be useful when you need to include the code in transaction that is not under your control. With single database, it does not need special configurations either.

  2. connection.BeginTransaction is ADO.NET syntax to implement transaction (in C#, VB.NET etc.) against single database. This does not work across multiple databases.

So, connection.BeginTransaction() is better way to go.

Even the better way to handle the transaction is to implement UnitOfWork as explained in this answer.

  • 3
    One doesn't need multiple databases to benefit from TransactionScope. Of particular utility is that it's ambient. It's great for wrapping code that you don't own or can't modify, in a transaction . For example it can be used to great effect when unit/integration testing code that does database calls where you want to roll back after. Just float a TransactionScope, test the code, and dispose during test cleanup. – Larry Smith Nov 14 '17 at 21:04
  • 3
    @LarrySmith: Agreed; but the question is not about anything of this. OP just says he want to insert in multiple tables in one transaction. Some answers including the accepted one, suggest to use TransactionScope which is inefficient for what OP want. I agree that TransactionScope is good tool in many cases; but not this. – Amit Joshi Nov 15 '17 at 5:10
4

Daniel's answer worked as expected for me. For completeness, here's a snippet that demonstrates commit and rollback using a transaction scope and dapper:

using System.Transactions;
    // _sqlConnection has been opened elsewhere in preceeding code 
    using (var transactionScope = new TransactionScope())
    {
        try
        {
            long result = _sqlConnection.ExecuteScalar<long>(sqlString, new {Param1 = 1, Param2 = "string"});

            transactionScope.Complete();
        }
        catch (Exception exception)
        {
            // Logger initialized elsewhere in code
            _logger.Error(exception, $"Error encountered whilst executing  SQL: {sqlString}, Message: {exception.Message}")

            // re-throw to let the caller know
            throw;
        }
    } // This is where Dispose is called 
  • 2
    @usr that comes down to personal preference. I prefer to know the first time something went wrong and don't see the log statements as litter. Also, my answer still ads value by demonstrating one way to use transactions with dapper – Sudhanshu Mishra Dec 2 '15 at 19:33
  • @CodeNaked, first, you've got the order wrong there. The catch block would be hit first if there's an exception, then the end of scope for using. Second, look at this answer and the referenced MSDN doc:stackoverflow.com/a/5306896/190476 calling dispose a second time isn't harmful, a well designed object ignores the second call. The downvote isn't justified! – Sudhanshu Mishra Aug 23 '16 at 20:18
  • @dotnetguy - I wasn't try to communicate which Dispose method is called first or second, just that it's called twice. As to the point that "calling dispose a second time isn't harmful", that's a big assumption. I've learned that the docs and the actual implementations often don't agree. But if you want Microsoft's word for it: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – CodeNaked Aug 23 '16 at 21:33
  • 3
    So, a code analysis warning is your reason to downvote? That doesn't make the answer wrong or misleading - that's when a downvote is appropriate. Why don't you edit the answer and propose a better solution whilst keeping the functionality? Stack overflow is all about helping and constructive criticism. – Sudhanshu Mishra Aug 23 '16 at 21:40

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