11

I have got an array of chars that I'm trying to bitwise shift right >>, then & with another array. I think I have got the wrong idea of how to do this.

I thought, even though it was an array of chars just stating my_array >>= 1 would shift everything but I am getting an error: "error: invalid operands to binary >> (have ‘char[8]’ and ‘int’)"

The bitwise comparision I am trying to do is with a similar size array initiated to all "0's"...for that I'm getting: "error: invalid operands to binary & (have ‘char *’ and ‘char *’)"

Do I need to convert these array's into something else before I can shift and compare?

Sorry, I was not super clear... All great advice up to this point and I think I am realizing more that there is no super easy way to do this. More specifically, what I am trying to do is shift the bits of the WHOLE char array right 1, adding the bit shifted off the right back to the left most side of the array, do the bitwise compare with another array of same size.

Technically the compare doesn't have to be array with array... I just need the bits. Would it be easier to convert the array's to something else before trying to do the shifts/comparisons?

  • 2
    Are you trying to rotate the contents of the array, or are you trying to bitwise shift each individual element of the array? Neither of those operations natively exist in C. You'll need to write a loop that either copies each element down one location, or bitwise shifts each element in the array. – chrisaycock Apr 28 '12 at 21:27
14

You have to shift and compare elementwise.

for(i = 0; i < len; ++i)
    array[i] >>= 3;

for example. If you want to move the bits shifted out of one element to the next, it's more complicated, say you're shifting right, then

unsigned char bits1 = 0, bits2 = 0;
for(i = len-1; i >= 0; --i) {
    bits2 = array[i] & 0x07;
    array[i] >>= 3;
    array[i] |= bits1 << 5;
    bits1 = bits2;
}

traversing the array in the other direction because you need the bits from the next higher slot.

3
/** Shift an array right.
 * @param ar The array to shift.
 * @param size The number of array elements.
 * @param shift The number of bits to shift.
 */
void shift_right(unsigned char *ar, int size, int shift)
{
    int carry = 0;                              // Clear the initial carry bit.
    while (shift--) {                           // For each bit to shift ...
        for (int i = size - 1; i >= 0; --i) {   // For each element of the array from high to low ...
            int next = (ar[i] & 1) ? 0x80 : 0;  // ... if the low bit is set, set the carry bit.
            ar[i] = carry | (ar[i] >> 1);       // Shift the element one bit left and addthe old carry.
            carry = next;                       // Remember the old carry for next time.
        }   
    }
}   
  • Well this look weird, or I'm missing something. It looks like a mix of shift right and shift left. The comment next to the carry bit says "Shift the element one bit left", but it shifts right. And the for loop is going high to low, I would rather go low to high for shifting right. – Andre Miras Jul 28 '15 at 11:44
  • Also I would move the "int carry = 0;" inside the while loop just before the for loop. – Andre Miras Jul 28 '15 at 12:06
  • This is very inefficient. If you want to shift the array 7 bits, then each char in the array will be iterated 7 times. Very inefficient indeed. – Jack Giffin Jul 12 '18 at 14:24
2

You'll have to shift the entries in the array one by one. (And if you want to compare two of these, you'll need to do it element by element.)

If you were hoping that bits shifted off each char would get shifted into the next one, you'll need to take care of that manually too.

If you are wanting that shift-into-the-next-byte behaviour, and don't mind making your code nasty and nonportable and bug-prone, you might be able to take a pointer to the array, cast it to something like unsigned long long *, dereference it and shift the resulting integer, and store it back again.

BUT if that's the behaviour you want then you should be using an integer instead of a char[8] to begin with.

(If you could say more about what you're actually aiming to achieve, then more helpful answers may be possible.)

2

If you want to perform operations such as shifting / OR / XOR / AND / etc.. on arrays, you should perform it in a loop, you cannot perform it directly on the array.

2

You can shift only members of that arrays, a char (or an int). You can't shift an entire array. Shifting my_array tries to perform a shift operation on an array type (or a pointer to char) which is impossible. Do this instead:

for (i = 0; i < size; i++) {
  my_array[i] >>= 1;
}

Also you must be careful with chars because they are usually signed, and a char containing a negative value will bring '1' from the left instead of zeros. So you better use unsigned chars.

EDIT: The code above is simplistic. If you intended to shift right the array as a whole, not just each byte on its own, then you need to "manually" copy each LSB to the MSB of the byte to its right. Take a loop at the answer of Richard Pennington.

  • I'd assume he wants to treat the array as a single value, so you'd need to carry a bit from the more significant byte too. – loganfsmyth Apr 28 '12 at 21:37
1

I know this is old topic but i was not satisfied with the answers available, here is something i wrote recently which allows you to specify the amount of bits you can shift by and also there is simple XOR encryption in it.

//https://github.com/ashvin-bhuttoo/CryptoTest/blob/master/CryptoTest/Crypto.cpp
//CRYPTO CONFIGURATION PARAMETERS
#define BIT_SHIFT 3
#define XOR_KEY 0x3C
#define ENABLE_XOR_VARIANCE true
////////////////////////////////

int get_rs_mask(int shift)
{
    switch (shift)
    {
    case 0:
        return 0x00;
    case 1:
        return 0x01;
    case 2:
        return 0x03;
    case 3:
        return 0x07;
    case 4:
        return 0x0F;
    case 5:
        return 0x1F;
    case 6:
        return 0x3F;
    case 7:
        return 0x7F;
    default:
        throw "get_rs_mask -> Error, shift argument outside legal range 0-7";
    }
}

void shift_right(char* buf, int msg_len, int shift)
{
    unsigned char tmp = 0x00, tmp2 = 0x00;
    for (int k = 0; k <= msg_len; k++)
    {
        if (k == 0)
        {
            tmp = buf[k];
            buf[k] >>= shift;
        }
        else
        {
            tmp2 = buf[k];
            buf[k] >>= shift;
            buf[k] |= ((tmp & get_rs_mask(shift)) << (8 - shift));

            if (k != msg_len)
                tmp = tmp2;
        }
    }
}

int get_ls_mask(int shift)
{
    switch (shift)
    {
    case 0:
        return 0x00;
    case 1:
        return 0x80;
    case 2:
        return 0xC0;
    case 3:
        return 0xE0;
    case 4:
        return 0xF0;
    case 5:
        return 0xF8;
    case 6:
        return 0xFC;
    case 7:
        return 0xFE;
    default:
        throw "get_ls_mask -> Error, shift argument outside legal range 0-7";
    }
}

void shift_left(char* buf, int msg_len, int shift)
{
    char tmp = 0x00, tmp2 = 0x00;
    for (int k = msg_len; k >= 0; k--)
    {
        if (k == msg_len)
        {
            tmp = buf[k];
            buf[k] <<= shift;
        }
        else
        {
            tmp2 = buf[k];
            buf[k] <<= shift;
            buf[k] |= ((tmp & get_ls_mask(shift)) >> (8 - shift));

            tmp = tmp2;
        }
    }
}

void crypt(char* buf, int msg_len, bool decrypt = false)
{
    if (!decrypt)
    {
        shift_right(buf, msg_len, BIT_SHIFT);
        for (int k = 0; k < msg_len; k++)
        {
            buf[k] = buf[k] ^ XOR_KEY ^ k * (ENABLE_XOR_VARIANCE ? 2 : 0);
        }
        buf[msg_len] = '\0';
    }
    else
    {
        for (int k = 0; k < msg_len; k++)
        {
            buf[k] = buf[k] ^ XOR_KEY ^ k * (ENABLE_XOR_VARIANCE ? 2 : 0);
        }
        shift_left(buf, (msg_len)-1, BIT_SHIFT);
    }
}
0
/**
 * shift a number of bits to the right
 *
 * @param   SRC         the array to shift
 * @param   len         the length of the array
 * @param   shift       the number of consecutive bits to shift
 *
*/
static void shift_bits_right(uint8_t SRC[], uint16_t len, uint32_t shift) {
    uint32_t i = 0;

    uint8_t start = shift / 8;
    uint8_t rest = shift % 8;
    uint8_t previous = 0;

    for(i = 0; i < len; i++) {
        if(start <= i) {
            previous = SRC[i - start];
        }
        uint8_t value = (previous << (8 - rest)) | SRC[i + start] >> rest;
        SRC[i + start] = value;
    }
}

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