22

Ok, trying to transfer a specified directory of files over a socket, remove the directory objects from the arraylist, so only files are left, and transfer them 1 by 1 over the same socket. The arraylist here is filled with ONLY files, no directories. Heres the receive and send code for the client and server respectively . The code runs fine without errors, except for ALL the data is being written to the first file. The subsequent files are created in the server folder, but they are 0 bytes. Any input would be greatly appreciated.

THIS IS THE SERVER CODE FOR RECEIVING THE FILES

public void receive(){


    try {
        DataInputStream dis = new DataInputStream(new BufferedInputStream(socket.getInputStream()));
        DataOutputStream dos = new DataOutputStream(new BufferedOutputStream(socket.getOutputStream()));
//read the number of files from the client
        int number = dis.readInt();
        ArrayList<File>files = new ArrayList<File>(number);
        System.out.println("Number of Files to be received: " +number);
        //read file names, add files to arraylist
        for(int i = 0; i< number;i++){
            File file = new File(dis.readUTF());
            files.add(file);
        }
        int n = 0;
        byte[]buf = new byte[4092];

        //outer loop, executes one for each file
        for(int i = 0; i < files.size();i++){

            System.out.println("Receiving file: " + files.get(i).getName());
            //create a new fileoutputstream for each new file
            FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream("C:\\users\\tom5\\desktop\\salestools\\" +files.get(i).getName());
            //read file
            while((n = dis.read(buf)) != -1){
                fos.write(buf,0,n);
                fos.flush();
            }
            fos.close();
        }

    } catch (IOException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();

    }


}

THIS IS THE CLIENT CODE FOR SENDING THE FILES

public void send(ArrayList<File>files){

    try {
        DataInputStream dis = new DataInputStream(new BufferedInputStream(socket.getInputStream()));
        DataOutputStream dos = new DataOutputStream(new BufferedOutputStream(socket.getOutputStream()));
        System.out.println(files.size());
//write the number of files to the server
        dos.writeInt(files.size());
        dos.flush();

        //write file names 
        for(int i = 0 ; i < files.size();i++){
            dos.writeUTF(files.get(i).getName());
            dos.flush();
        }

        //buffer for file writing, to declare inside or outside loop?
        int n = 0;
        byte[]buf = new byte[4092];
        //outer loop, executes one for each file
        for(int i =0; i < files.size(); i++){

            System.out.println(files.get(i).getName());
            //create new fileinputstream for each file
            FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(files.get(i));

            //write file to dos
            while((n =fis.read(buf)) != -1){
                dos.write(buf,0,n);
                dos.flush();

            }
            //should i close the dataoutputstream here and make a new one each time?
        }
        //or is this good?
        dos.close();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }


}
  • 1
    Trying to teach myself Java, just doing some simple projects to play with io for the first time. I have a feeling my dos.write(buf,0,n) and its receive partner just keep reading and writing thus all data being written to the first file? Do i need to add a control to signal when the first file has been written completely? – Tom 5 Apr 28 '12 at 21:53
  • basically, yes. – ControlAltDel Apr 28 '12 at 21:56
  • Hmm, still having the same problem, all data is being written to the first file dunno what I'm doing wrong. – Tom 5 Apr 28 '12 at 22:26
  • 1
    another option would be to write the sizes of each file, along with the file names, in the 'header'. Then your server-side code can know when to stop writing to each file, and start the next. – GreyBeardedGeek Apr 29 '12 at 0:49
25

You are reading the socket until read() returns -1. This is the end-of-stream condition (EOS). EOS happens when the peer closes the connection. Not when it finishes writing one file.

You need to send the file size ahead of each file. You're already doing a similar thing with the file count. Then make sure you read exactly that many bytes for that file:

String filename = dis.readUTF();
long fileSize = dis.readLong();
FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream(filename);
while (fileSize > 0 && (n = dis.read(buf, 0, (int)Math.min(buf.length, fileSize))) != -1)
{
  fos.write(buf,0,n);
  fileSize -= n;
}
fos.close();

You can enclose all this in a loop that terminates when readUTF() throws EOFException. Conversely of course you have to call writeUTF(filename) and writeLong(filesize) at the sender, before sending the data.

  • Can't the shutdownOutput also be used to indicate EOF? – Cratylus Apr 29 '12 at 9:57
  • @user384706 Yes. Once per connection. So you could only send one file. – user207421 Apr 29 '12 at 10:07
  • That worked perfectly, Im confused about the n = dis.read(buf,0,Math.min) part, does the math.min determine if the file size is smaller than the buffer size? and if so, it will only partially fill the buffer with only the file.length? – Tom 5 Apr 30 '12 at 14:41
  • @Tom The Math.min() is to handle the last buffer correctly. You can't assume the file size is a multiple of your buffer length. – user207421 Apr 30 '12 at 23:31
  • @FadlyDzil This is not a coding service. I have already provided all the code necessary. I would expect any competent programmer to be able to turn my other remarks into working code. – user207421 Apr 28 at 6:59
1

I did it like this, it is working perfectly, you can take a look:

Send

byte[] done = new byte[3];
String str = "done";  //randomly anything
done = str.getBytes();
for (int i = 0; i < files.size(); i++) {
    System.out.println(files.get(i).getName());
    FileInputStream fis = new FileInputStream(files.get(i));
    while ((n = fis.read(buf)) != -1) {
        dos.write(buf, 0, n);
        System.out.println(n);
        dos.flush();
    }
    //should i close the dataoutputstream here and make a new one each time?                 
    dos.write(done, 0, 3);
    dos.flush();
}
//or is this good?
dos.close();

Receive

for (int i = 0; i < files.size(); i++) {
    System.out.println("Receiving file: " + files.get(i).getName());
    //create a new fileoutputstream for each new file
    fos = new FileOutputStream("C:\\users\\tom5\\desktop\\salestools\\" + files.get(i).getName());
    //read file
    while ((n = dis.read(buf)) != -1 && n != 3) {
        fos.write(buf, 0, n);
        fos.flush();
    }
    fos.close();
}
  • thanks to your problem, i learnt something new that what you were asking to close the DataOutputStream after every file transfer, it actually closes the underlying stream, and thus the socket is kind of closed. Close()-Closes this output stream and releases any system resources associated with the stream. Javadocs. – Nikhar Apr 29 '12 at 16:16
  • hmmm, I'm sending the file size now and storing them in a int array. I added this to my server while loop, while((n = dis.read(buf)) != -1 && bytesRead < fileSize)); – Tom 5 Apr 30 '12 at 13:27
  • ok, i tried that too, but there was a loss/gain of few bytes. Just check the last file that was transferred, is it losing few bytes? – Nikhar Apr 30 '12 at 13:56
  • oh ya, for example, receiving 5 files, sometimes it will receive all the bytes in the first 3 iterations, and the 2 last files would be 0 bytes, sometimes it would receive bytes into the 4th iteration. Was pretty random – Tom 5 Apr 30 '12 at 15:18
  • Although, read the above post where Math.min was added to the while((n = dis.read(buf,0,Math.min(n, FileSizes[i])). That corrected the problem completely, but scrambled my brain in the process – Tom 5 Apr 30 '12 at 15:20

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