79

I noticed that you can't have abstract constants in PHP.

Is there a way I can force a child class to define a constant (which I need to use in one of the abstract class internal methods) ?

3
  • A constant it full scope once set its available in every class, function method or what-not. it makes no sense, please provide some code to explain abit more. Apr 29, 2012 at 0:10
  • 2
    Either define a constant in the abstract class (thus every child class has a constant, even if it does not define its own), or use an abstract function (which forces every child class to define its own). Edit: the short answer to your question is no.
    – halfer
    Apr 29, 2012 at 0:17
  • If you a value must be set at runtime than it is, by definition, a variable. Dec 24, 2018 at 2:42

7 Answers 7

95

This may be a bit of a ‘hack’, but does the job with very little effort, but just with a different error message if the constant is not declared in the child class.

A self-referential constant declaration is syntactically correct and parses without problem, only throwing an error if that declaration is actually executed at runtime, so a self-referential declaration in the abstract class must be overridden in a child class else there will be fatal error: Cannot declare self-referencing constant.

In this example, the abstract, parent class Foo forces all its children to declare the variable NAME. This code runs fine, outputting Donald. However, if the child class Fooling did not declare the variable, the fatal error would be triggered.

<?php

abstract class Foo {

    // Self-referential 'abstract' declaration
    const NAME = self::NAME;

}

class Fooling extends Foo {

    // Overrides definition from parent class
    // Without this declaration, an error will be triggered
    const NAME = 'Donald';

}

$fooling = new Fooling();

echo $fooling::NAME;
13
  • 18
    Just an FYI, I tried this just now in php 7.2 and it's not working. Throwing exception: Fatal error: Uncaught Error: Cannot declare self-referencing constant 'self::RAW_DATA_CACHE_KEY' Nov 7, 2018 at 1:30
  • 6
    I've just tested with PHP 7.2.19 and it works like a charm. Please notice that you can't call self::NAME inside the class, but $this::NAME.
    – StR
    Aug 5, 2019 at 20:25
  • 4
    @ChrisFlannagan try static::NAME Sep 11, 2019 at 21:09
  • 4
    PhpStorm 2019.3.4 incorrectly marks this as an error "Cannot declare self-referencing constant", however, it's a bug, this is valid syntax. Vote for the bug report: youtrack.jetbrains.com/issue/WI-58073 Jan 18, 2021 at 16:57
  • 4
    This solution doesn't work in PHP 7.4, during runtime the exception "Cannot declare self-referencing constant 'self::MY_VAR'" is thrown.
    – Moongazer
    Sep 20, 2021 at 16:11
33

A constant is a constant; there is no abstract or private constants in PHP as far as I know, but you can have a work around:

Sample Abstract Class

abstract class Hello {
    const CONSTANT_1 = 'abstract'; // Make Abstract
    const CONSTANT_2 = 'abstract'; // Make Abstract
    const CONSTANT_3 = 'Hello World'; // Normal Constant
    function __construct() {
        Enforcer::__add(__CLASS__, get_called_class());
    }
}

This would run fine

class Foo extends Hello {
    const CONSTANT_1 = 'HELLO_A';
    const CONSTANT_2 = 'HELLO_B';
}
new Foo();

Bar would return Error

class Bar extends Hello {
    const CONSTANT_1 = 'BAR_A';
}
new Bar();

Songo would return Error

class Songo extends Hello {

}
new Songo();

Enforcer Class

class Enforcer {
    public static function __add($class, $c) {
        $reflection = new ReflectionClass($class);
        $constantsForced = $reflection->getConstants();
        foreach ($constantsForced as $constant => $value) {
            if (constant("$c::$constant") == "abstract") {
                throw new Exception("Undefined $constant in " . (string) $c);
            }
        }
    }
}
16
  • 4
    That's not a constant, that's a function.
    – Zombaya
    Apr 29, 2012 at 0:07
  • 1
    @Baba good work around :) But does that mean that for every constant there is going to be an if statement?
    – Songo
    Apr 29, 2012 at 0:38
  • 1
    @Songo .. you can see updated code .. its already working for normal and abstract .... i change the keywords so you can understand
    – Baba
    Apr 29, 2012 at 22:16
  • 12
    While this works, I feel that this solution is rather cumbersome, unreliable and introduces unneeded complexity. If the Abstract class depends on runtime information, @Alex should either use the Template Method pattern with Constant Methods or check inside the processing methods for the existence of the default constant value. Also, the hardcoded dependency on the Enforcer in the ctor is easily overlooked. A subclass could override the ctor and then all that dirty fiddling with the Reflection API wouldn't work anymore.
    – Gordon
    Oct 27, 2012 at 10:08
  • 5
    My comment includes two suggestions for a better solution. Also, if you know your solution is only a Proof-of-Concept and not to be used in production, the answer should say so. People coming to SO usually seek help for real problems they face in production. But they don't necessarily know something is bad practise, a hack or just for "educational purpose". Unless told so. That's why I am pointing it out.
    – Gordon
    Oct 27, 2012 at 11:04
24

Unfortunately not... a constant is exactly what it says on the tin, constant. Once defined it can't be redefined, so in that way, it is impossible to require its definition through PHP's abstract inheritance or interfaces.

However... you could check to see if the constant is defined in the parent class's constructor. If it doesn't, throw an Exception.

abstract class A
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        if (!defined('static::BLAH'))
        {
            throw new Exception('Constant BLAH is not defined on subclass ' . get_class($this));
        }
    }
}

class B extends A
{
    const BLAH = 'here';
}

$b = new B();

This is the best way I can think of doing this from your initial description.

4
  • 8
    A constant's value can be overridden in a child class. Constants are not immune to that sort of redefinition.
    – Brilliand
    Feb 12, 2015 at 19:21
  • @Brilliand yeah that is not a constant then. Jun 13, 2020 at 8:28
  • 1
    @AlfonsoFernandez-Ocampo If it's in a different context (i.e. a child class), then it's effectively a different constant, not a change to the first constant. Having "constant" mean that nothing can be defined elsewhere that obscures the constant would be rather extreme.
    – Brilliand
    Jun 14, 2020 at 12:05
  • 1
    This is the most elegant solution in PHP 7.4 and higher, in my opinion. Could even make an array with constant names and associated error messages to print and loop through it in the constructor, if you have a lot of them. Jul 1, 2022 at 18:51
18

No, yet you could try other ways such as abstract methods:

abstract class Fruit
{
    abstract function getName();
    abstract function getColor();

    public function printInfo()
    {
        echo "The {$this->getName()} is {$this->getColor()}";
    }
}

class Apple extends Fruit
{
    function getName() { return 'apple'; }
    function getColor() { return 'red'; }

    //other apple methods
}

class Banana extends Fruit
{
    function getName() { return 'banana'; }
    function getColor() { return 'yellow'; }

    //other banana methods
}  

or static members:

abstract class Fruit
{
    protected static $name;
    protected static $color;

    public function printInfo()
    {
        echo "The {static::$name} is {static::$color}";
    }
}

class Apple extends Fruit
{
    protected static $name = 'apple';
    protected static $color = 'red';

    //other apple methods
}

class Banana extends Fruit
{
    protected static $name = 'banana';
    protected static $color = 'yellow';

    //other banana methods
} 

Source

2
  • 8
    If you copy code from elsewhere on the web, make sure you are also citing the source. The above code was taken from sitepoint.com/forums/showthread.php?629565-Abstract-constants
    – Gordon
    Oct 27, 2012 at 10:16
  • 3
    This is better then the accepted answer. If an abstract class depends on the child class, define an abstract method to declare this dependency and use the method to get the value from the implementing class.
    – Kwebble
    Jun 9, 2016 at 7:43
3

Maybe I'm missing something, but using late static binding worked for me. Does this work for your question?

abstract class A{
    const NAME=null;

    static function f(){
        return static::NAME;
    }
}

class B extends A{
    const NAME='B';    
}

B::f();
1
  • This is arguably the safest way to do it, especially if NAME has to be a particular type. You can enforce the proper type in the function, and you can catch the error or let it fail outright if the child class didn't redeclare it. As much as I like the most popular "self-referential" answer, it seems too unstable.
    – Andron
    Feb 20, 2022 at 17:33
2

Tested in php 7.2 but should since 5.3 you can leverage late static binding to archive this behaviour. It will throw an Fatal Error achchieving the same as an Exception because in most causes you dont want to handle Fatal Errors at runtime. If you want so you can easily implement a custom error handler.

So the following works for me:

<?php

abstract class Foo {

    public function __construct() {
        echo static::BAR;
    }

}


class Bar extends Foo {
    const BAR = "foo bar";
}

$bar = new Bar();    //foo bar

If you remove the const you will get an:

Fatal error: Uncaught Error: Undefined class constant 'BAR' in ...
1
  • 2
    Unfortunatly you don't get a compile time error - you only get an error when you execute echo static::BAR;. An IDE or static analyser won't tell the author of class Bar that they have to define the constant.
    – bdsl
    Aug 4, 2020 at 11:44
0

PHP Interfaces support constants. It's not as ideal because you would have to remember to implement the interface on every child class so it kind of defeats the purpose partially.

2
  • Since php 8.1, this should probably be the accepted answer now. It's now possible to declare an interface constant and override it in an implementing class.
    – Optimum
    Apr 29, 2022 at 13:59
  • Having an Interface constant defined doesn't enforce the implementing class to redefine the constant. So this is not a solution to the problem as described by the author of the question.
    – JHoffmann
    Sep 8, 2022 at 9:07

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.