2

I want to preface this by saying that I've done very little programming in C, so I'd prefer to know why a given solution works rather than just what it is.

I'm trying to write a function which will take a pathname, and return a pathname to a different file in the same directory.

  "/example/directory/with/image.png" => "/example/directory/with/thumbnail.png"

What I've tried after reading up on example uses of realpath and dirname (I'm working on Linux; if there's a cross-platform equivalent, let me know) is:

#include <limits.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

char *chop_path(char *orig) {
  char buf[PATH_MAX + 1];
  char *res, *dname, *thumb;

  res = realpath(orig, buf);
  if (res) {
    dname = dirname(res);
    thumb = strcat(dname, "/thumbnail.png");
    return thumb;
  }
  return 0;
}

Compiling it seems to work, but running the program with

int main(void) {
  char *res = chop_path("original.png");
  if (res) {
    printf("Resulting pathname: %s", res);
  } 
  return 0;
}

gives me a segfault. Any hints?

9
  • You shouldn't allow your chop_path function to not return a value (are you getting a warning on that?) Add a return 0; at the end of the function.
    – jmq
    Apr 30, 2012 at 3:54
  • @jmquigley - Added. No warning about it; the only one I got was about a missing cast on the dname=dirname(res) line.
    – Inaimathi
    Apr 30, 2012 at 3:57
  • 1
    What distribution of linux and version of gcc are you using? I'm using FreeBSD and dirname is in a different header (I was able to compile/run your code in gcc 4.2.1 after adding Ernest Friedman-Hill's suggestion, fixing the return and adding the required header for dirname in FreeBSD).
    – jmq
    Apr 30, 2012 at 4:01
  • @jmquigley - I'm running gcc 4.6.2 in Debian wheezy. And... <facepalm /> adding #include <libgen.h> gets it working on existing files.
    – Inaimathi
    Apr 30, 2012 at 4:07
  • 1
    I think the issue is that C assumes a function returns int, in the absence of any other information. Without the header, that's the assumption here. On a 32-bit machine, the conversion would (in general) always succeed. But on a 64-bit machine an int is 32 bits and a pointer is 64, and so the conversion can fail to produce the proper result. Apr 30, 2012 at 4:31

2 Answers 2

2

The only problem I see is the signature of your chop_path routine; it should be

char *chop_path(char *orig) {

Your version has a missing *. That makes an enormous difference actually; without the *, you're effectively telling dirname and realpath to interpret the character code of the first character in your argument string as the numerical address (i.e., a pointer to) the path. That's going to point into a location in low memory that you definitely have not allocated; trying to use it results in that "segmentation fault" error, which means, effectively, that you're trying to touch memory you're not allowed to.

The other issue turned out to be that the dirname() function is declared in libgen.h, which you weren't including. If you don't include that header, the compiler assumes dirname() returns int instead of a pointer, and on a 64-bit architecture, the 64-bit return value from the function gets chopped down to 32 bits, a bad pointer is assigned to dname, and that's going to cause your seg fault right there.

7
  • Why is a string literal implicitly convertible to a char? Apr 30, 2012 at 3:34
  • Edited my original to reflect your suggestion. Adding the * doesn't get rid of the segfault though.
    – Inaimathi
    Apr 30, 2012 at 3:46
  • In classic C, almost anything is implicitly convertible to an int. A pointer, a character, a boolean expression (well, those are natively int, but you get the idea.) As a result, you end up being able to pass pretty much anything as pretty much anything, and there's an implicit conversion through int that makes it work. Many compilers will warn about some of the worst conversions, but they're not errors. Modern versions of C, and C's pickier cousin C++, are much better about this. Apr 30, 2012 at 3:48
  • @Inaimathi -- I don't get a segfault when run your program; indeed, I don't get anything at all. If, on the other hand, I change the argument in main to be the full path of an actual file on my system, then it works as expected (Mac OS X, gcc 4.0.1.) Now, strangely, I get a warning the assignment to dname when I compile about making a pointer of an integer, and I can't explain that one. Do you see any warnings when you compile? Apr 30, 2012 at 3:59
  • 1
    The warning was (as warnings often are!) a good clue. Sounds like you're in business now! Apr 30, 2012 at 4:13
1

If you don't want to use dirname, realpath, unwanted string buffer and string operations, etc - you can do the following:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <limits.h>

#define FILE_MAX 100

void chop_path(char path_name[], char new_file[]) {
    int len = strlen(path_name);
    int i;

    for (i=len-1; i>0 ; i--) {
        if (path_name[i] == '/') {
            strcpy(path_name+i+1, new_file);
            break;
        }   
    }   

    return;
}

int main(void) {
    char path[PATH_MAX + 1] = "/this/is/a/path/filename.c";
    char new_file[FILE_MAX] = "newfilename.txt";

    printf("old : %s \n", path);
    chop_path(path, new_file);
    printf("new : %s \n", path);

    return 0;
}

Output:

$ gcc path.c 
$ ./a.out 
old : /this/is/a/path/filename.c 
new : /this/is/a/path/newfilename.txt 
$ 
1
  • I don't mind breaking the path string manually, but I would prefer not to use a procedure that relies on side effect. Confirmed that this works though; I may end up using in the end.
    – Inaimathi
    Apr 30, 2012 at 4:05

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