20

I know the title is vague but I didn't know what to write.
In javascript, I know how to write functions that will be called like this :

argument1.function(argument2);

Here is the fiddle demonstration : http://jsfiddle.net/rFXhf/
Now I wonder if I can do :

argument1.argument2.function(argument3);//And even more!
  • 1
    what are you trying to do? – Colleen Apr 30 '12 at 4:08
26

you need to define the objects like this :

var argument1 = {
    myvar : "12",
    mymethod : function(test) { return something; }
}

then call mymethod like:

argument1.mymethod(parameter);

or the deeper version :

var argument1 = {
    argument2 : {
       mymethod : function(test) { return something; }
    }
} 

then:

argument1.argument2.mymethod(parameter);
  • This would work but i want a version like the jsfiddle where you just write : var a;var b;a.pow(b); for exemple – user1365010 Apr 30 '12 at 4:12
  • do you have a specific type of arguments or you want it to work on anything? – Taha Paksu Apr 30 '12 at 4:14
  • Ok, now I got it. I don't think you can do that because "." connector is for objects reaching its sub functions/variables. – Taha Paksu Apr 30 '12 at 4:23
  • Is that not the same a myMethod(argument1, argument2, parameter) ? – sujumayas Jul 2 at 19:44
  • @sujumayas no it isn't. you can't access argument1 argument2 in the nested method. You don't need to. Think it like containers of functions. one object can contain any type of nodes, so you nest it with inner objects. – Taha Paksu Jul 12 at 5:56
21

Modern ES6 Approach

You no longer need to specify the function keyword when defining functions inside objects:

var myObj = {
  myMethod(params) {
    // ...do something here
  }
  myOtherMethod(params) {
    // ...do something here
  }
  nestedObj: {
    myNestedMethod(params) {
      // ...do somethinghere
    }
  }
};

Equivalent except repetitive and verbose:

var myObj = {
  myMethod: function myMethod(params) {
    // ...do something here
  }
  myOtherMethod: function myOtherMethod(params) {
    // ...do something here
  }
  nestedObj: {
    myNestedMethod: function myNestedMethod(params) {
      // ...do somethinghere
    }
  }
};
  • 1
    this makes more sense to me when using ES6 myMethod: params => { // ...do something here } – Rubanov May 2 at 14:11

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.