67

What are some good patterns for error handling in VBA?

In particular, what should I do in this situation:

... some code ...
... some code where an error might occur ...
... some code ...
... some other code where a different error might occur ...
... some other code ...
... some code that must always be run (like a finally block) ...

I want to handle both errors, and resume execution after the code where the error may occur. Also, the finally code at the end must ALWAYS run - no matter what exceptions are thrown earlier. How can I achieve this outcome?

12 Answers 12

91

Error Handling in VBA


  • On Error Goto ErrorHandlerLabel
  • Resume (Next | ErrorHandlerLabel)
  • On Error Goto 0 (disables current error handler)
  • Err object

The Err object's properties are normally reset to zero or a zero-length string in the error handling routine, but it can also be done explicitly with Err.Clear.

Errors in the error handling routine are terminating.

The range 513-65535 is available for user errors. For custom class errors, you add vbObjectError to the error number. See MS documentation about Err.Raise and the list of error numbers.

For not implemented interface members in a derived class, you should use the constant E_NOTIMPL = &H80004001.


Option Explicit

Sub HandleError()
  Dim a As Integer
  On Error GoTo errMyErrorHandler
    a = 7 / 0
  On Error GoTo 0

  Debug.Print "This line won't be executed."

DoCleanUp:
  a = 0
Exit Sub
errMyErrorHandler:
  MsgBox Err.Description, _
    vbExclamation + vbOKCancel, _
    "Error: " & CStr(Err.Number)
Resume DoCleanUp
End Sub

Sub RaiseAndHandleError()
  On Error GoTo errMyErrorHandler
    ' The range 513-65535 is available for user errors.
    ' For class errors, you add vbObjectError to the error number.
    Err.Raise vbObjectError + 513, "Module1::Test()", "My custom error."
  On Error GoTo 0

  Debug.Print "This line will be executed."

Exit Sub
errMyErrorHandler:
  MsgBox Err.Description, _
    vbExclamation + vbOKCancel, _
    "Error: " & CStr(Err.Number)
  Err.Clear
Resume Next
End Sub

Sub FailInErrorHandler()
  Dim a As Integer
  On Error GoTo errMyErrorHandler
    a = 7 / 0
  On Error GoTo 0

  Debug.Print "This line won't be executed."

DoCleanUp:
  a = 0
Exit Sub
errMyErrorHandler:
  a = 7 / 0 ' <== Terminating error!
  MsgBox Err.Description, _
    vbExclamation + vbOKCancel, _
    "Error: " & CStr(Err.Number)
Resume DoCleanUp
End Sub

Sub DontDoThis()

  ' Any error will go unnoticed!
  On Error Resume Next
  ' Some complex code that fails here.
End Sub

Sub DoThisIfYouMust()

  On Error Resume Next
  ' Some code that can fail but you don't care.
  On Error GoTo 0

  ' More code here
End Sub
  • 1
    this is great, but is there a place where all errors are listed So that I can know if mine is preexisting or if I need to create it? – PsychoData Feb 14 '14 at 18:38
  • 3
    @PsychoData, here is a list of the error codes support.microsoft.com/kb/146864 – Elias Feb 24 '14 at 17:33
  • How the code above should be changed in order to log on the enter and every exit of the called code (procedure, function, method and so on)? – Aleksey F. Jun 6 '15 at 4:12
33

I would also add:

  • The global Err object is the closest you have to an exception object
  • You can effectively "throw an exception" with Err.Raise

And just for fun:

  • On Error Resume Next is the devil incarnate and to be avoided, as it silently hides errors
  • 8
    +1 for warning about On Eror Resume Next. Probably one of the number one reasons why VB programs are generally so full of bugs. – Makis Jun 24 '09 at 12:50
  • 8
    Not true. When used correctly On Error Resume Next is an equivalent of try/catch. Correct use just requires checking or saving the error status after every line. It does make complex error checking much less verbose. HOWEVER, incorrectly used, all the above applies. – Ben McIntyre Oct 30 '13 at 6:45
  • 2
    I think everyone would agree that On Error is the equivalent of Try/Catch yes... but On Error Resume Next? It causes all errors to disappear - including the ones we never anticipated. It's better to let errors bleed out than head-scratch for weeks on why something weird is going on [this has happened to me when debugging someone else's code]. I only use it in very special circumstances, tight small functions where an oddity forces you into an error (e.g. does this item exist in a Collection). – Joel Goodwin Oct 31 '13 at 8:48
  • 2
    If you put too much code in errMyErrorHandler: you risk an error happening in your error handler which creates an endless loop. If you put On Error Resume Next before you process the error in errMyErrorHandler it resets the Err object and you lose the error information. I move my error processing to a sub and pass the err.num and description as parameters so I can then use On Error Resume Next as I reset everything like screenupdating and cursor etc and show the error using the param values... Call mdl_val.usr_sub_handle_error(Err.Source, Err.Description) – DWiener May 26 '14 at 0:15
  • 1
    "to be avoided" is not exactly. There are many cases requiring On Error Resume Next. The common principle of these cases is when some results are returned by throwing an exception. The most often case is the accessing of a Collection object by the string key: in this case the caller can't know if there is an item with that key in the Collection object. – Aleksey F. Jun 6 '15 at 4:06
16

So you could do something like this

Function Errorthingy(pParam)
On Error GoTo HandleErr

 ' your code here

    ExitHere:
    ' your finally code
    Exit Function

    HandleErr:
        Select Case Err.Number
        ' different error handling here'
        Case Else
            MsgBox "Error " & Err.Number & ": " & Err.Description, vbCritical, "ErrorThingy"
        End Select


   Resume ExitHere

End Function

If you want to bake in custom exceptions. (e.g. ones that violate business rules) use the example above but use the goto to alter the flow of the method as necessary.

  • 1
    That's pretty much how we handled errors in a big VB6 application back in the days. Worked relatively well and was easy to use. IIRC, we had an error handling class that was called instead of having the error code in the function. That way it was much easier to change the behaviour as well. – Makis Jun 24 '09 at 12:52
  • It's generally a good idea to put "On Error GoTo 0" after the block of code where you need error handling. Besides, any error in the error handling code is terminating. – guillermooo Jun 25 '09 at 7:50
  • 3
    No idea if this is idiomatic VBA, but for .NET devs, if you rename "HandleErr" to "Catch" and "ExitHere" to "Finally" and squint... – user1454265 May 11 '15 at 18:10
  • @user1454265 ... then you can easily miss the Resume ExitHere which makes a lot of the difference between the two paradigms. – AntoineL Jul 27 '17 at 15:19
11

Here's my standard implementation. I like the labels to be self-descriptive.

Public Sub DoSomething()

    On Error GoTo Catch ' Try
    ' normal code here

    Exit Sub
Catch:

    'error code: you can get the specific error by checking Err.Number

End Sub

Or, with a Finally block:

Public Sub DoSomething()

    On Error GoTo Catch ' Try

    ' normal code here

    GoTo Finally
Catch:

    'error code

Finally:

    'cleanup code

End Sub
  • 1
    What does happen if an exception is raised after Finally:? So On Error GoTo 0 immediately after Finally: maybe needed to fix the unwanted recursion. – Aleksey F. Jun 7 '15 at 4:18
  • 2
    If there is an error after the Finally block, it will just throw the error. It will not re-loop back to the Finally block. (Try it, you'll see.) If you want to handle an error after the Finally block, you'll need to add another On Error GoTo, but probably with another label, like Catch2. But here we start to digress into Clean Code methodology --> a clean method will only need one error handler (and should even have it's own dedicated method for error catching.) – LimaNightHawk Jan 4 '17 at 14:21
  • @LimaNightHawk: I believe what happens after Finally: depends whether you enter it after having been diverted to Catch: (then yes it just throws out)... or not! And in that latter case, i.e. having gone through GoTo Finally will have the On Error GoTo Catch still in effect, so the control is diverted toward Catch: (could be a good thing), then Finally: is re-entered, probably not what you expected in the first place. – AntoineL Jul 27 '17 at 15:32
  • If you add another On Error GoTo Catch2 in Finally: code, it will been effective in that latter case but not if you went through Catch: before, because there is no On Error GoTo -1 nor any Resume; adding the former is bringing us so far away from regular try catch finally that one might consider stopping dubious analogy before that point. – AntoineL Jul 27 '17 at 15:32
  • @AntoineL Yes! Agree with both, great observation and clarification. – LimaNightHawk Jul 28 '17 at 16:15
3

I use a piece of code that i developed myself and it is pretty good for my codes:

In the beginning of the function or sub, I define:

On error Goto ErrorCatcher:

and then, I handle the possible errors

ErrorCatcher:
Select Case Err.Number

Case 0 'exit the code when no error was raised
    On Error GoTo 0
    Exit Function
Case 1 'Error on definition of object
    'do stuff
Case... 'little description here
    'do stuff
Case Else
    Debug.Print "###ERROR"
    Debug.Print "   • Number  :", Err.Number
    Debug.Print "   • Descrip :", Err.Description
    Debug.Print "   • Source  :", Err.Source
    Debug.Print "   • HelpCont:", Err.HelpContext
    Debug.Print "   • LastDLL :", Err.LastDllError
    Stop
    Err.Clear
    Resume
End Select
3

Professional Excel Development has a pretty good error handling scheme. If you're going to spend any time in VBA, it's probably worth getting the book. There are a number of areas where VBA is lacking and this book has good suggestions for managing those areas.

PED describes two error handling methods. The main one is a system where all entry point procedures are subprocedures and all other procedures are functions that return Booleans.

The entry point procedure use On Error statements to capture errors pretty much as designed. The non-entry point procedures return True if there were no errors and False if there were errors. Non-entry point procedures also use On Error.

Both types of procedures use a central error handling procedure to keep the error in state and to log the error.

3

Here's a pretty decent pattern.

For debugging: When an error is raised, hit Ctrl-Break (or Ctrl-Pause), drag the break marker (or whatever it's called) down to the Resume line, hit F8 and you'll step to the line that "threw" the error.

The ExitHandler is your "Finally".

Hourglass will be killed every time. Status bar text will be cleared every time.

Public Sub ErrorHandlerExample()
    Dim dbs As DAO.Database
    Dim rst As DAO.Recordset

    On Error GoTo ErrHandler
    Dim varRetVal As Variant

    Set dbs = CurrentDb
    Set rst = dbs.OpenRecordset("SomeTable", dbOpenDynaset, dbSeeChanges + dbFailOnError)

    Call DoCmd.Hourglass(True)

    'Do something with the RecordSet and close it.

    Call DoCmd.Hourglass(False)

ExitHandler:
    Set rst = Nothing
    Set dbs = Nothing
    Exit Sub

ErrHandler:
    Call DoCmd.Hourglass(False)
    Call DoCmd.SetWarnings(True)
    varRetVal = SysCmd(acSysCmdClearStatus)

    Dim errX As DAO.Error
    If Errors.Count > 1 Then
       For Each errX In DAO.Errors
          MsgBox "ODBC Error " & errX.Number & vbCrLf & errX.Description
       Next errX
    Else
        MsgBox "VBA Error " & Err.Number & ": " & vbCrLf & Err.Description & vbCrLf & "In: Form_MainForm", vbCritical
    End If

    Resume ExitHandler
    Resume

End Sub



    Select Case Err.Number
        Case 3326 'This Recordset is not updateable
            'Do something about it. Or not...
        Case Else
            MsgBox "VBA Error " & Err.Number & ": " & vbCrLf & Err.Description & vbCrLf & "In: Form_MainForm", vbCritical
    End Select

It also traps for both DAO and VBA errors. You can put a Select Case in the VBA error section if you want to trap for specific Err numbers.

Select Case Err.Number
    Case 3326 'This Recordset is not updateable
        'Do something about it. Or not...
    Case Else
        MsgBox "VBA Error " & Err.Number & ": " & vbCrLf & Err.Description & vbCrLf & "In: Form_MainForm", vbCritical
End Select
2

The code below shows an alternative that ensures there is only one exit point for the sub/function.

sub something()
    on error goto errHandler

    ' start of code
    ....
    ....
    'end of code

    ' 1. not needed but signals to any other developer that looks at this
    ' code that you are skipping over the error handler...
    ' see point 1...
    err.clear

errHandler:
    if err.number <> 0 then
        ' error handling code
    end if
end sub
2

Also relevant to the discussion is the relatively unknown Erl function. If you have numeric labels within your code procedure, e.g.,

Sub AAA()
On Error Goto ErrorHandler

1000:
' code
1100:
' more code
1200:
' even more code that causes an error
1300:
' yet more code
9999: ' end of main part of procedure
ErrorHandler:
If Err.Number <> 0 Then
   Debug.Print "Error: " + CStr(Err.Number), Err.Descrption, _
      "Last Successful Line: " + CStr(Erl)
End If   
End Sub 

The Erl function returns the most recently encountered numberic line label. In the example above, if a run-time error occurs after label 1200: but before 1300:, the Erl function will return 1200, since that is most recenlty sucessfully encountered line label. I find it to be a good practice to put a line label immediately above your error handling block. I typcially use 9999 to indicate that the main part of the procuedure ran to its expected conculsion.

NOTES:

  • Line labels MUST be positive integers -- a label like MadeItHere: isn't recogonized by Erl.

  • Line labels are completely unrelated to the actual line numbers of a VBIDE CodeModule. You can use any positive numbers you want, in any order you want. In the example above, there are only 25 or so lines of code, but the line label numbers begin at 1000. There is no relationship between editor line numbers and line label numbers used with Erl.

  • Line label numbers need not be in any particular order, although if they are not in ascending, top-down order, the efficacy and benefit of Erl is greatly diminished, but Erl will still report the correct number.

  • Line labels are specific to the procedure in which they appear. If procedure ProcA calls procedure ProcB and an error occurs in ProcB that passes control back to ProcA, Erl (in ProcA) will return the most recently encounterd line label number in ProcA before it calls ProcB. From within ProcA, you cannot get the line label numbers that might appear in ProcB.

Use care when putting line number labels within a loop. For example,

For X = 1 To 100
500:
' some code that causes an error
600:
Next X

If the code following line label 500 but before 600 causes an error, and that error arises on the 20th iteration of the loop, Erl will return 500, even though 600 has been encounterd successfully in the previous 19 interations of the loop.

Proper placement of line labels within the procedure is critical to using the Erl function to get truly meaningful information.

There are any number of free utilies on the net that will insert numeric line label in a procedure automatically, so you have fine-grained error information while developing and debugging, and then remove those labels once code goes live.

If your code displays error information to the end user if an unexpected error occurs, providing the value from Erl in that information can make finding and fixing the problem VASTLY simpler than if value of Erl is not reported.

1

My personal view on a statement made earlier in this thread:

And just for fun:

On Error Resume Next is the devil incarnate and to be avoided, as it silently hides errors.

I'm using the On Error Resume Next on procedures where I don't want an error to stop my work and where any statement does not depend on the result of the previous statements.

When I'm doing this I add a global variable debugModeOn and I set it to True. Then I use it this way:

If not debugModeOn Then On Error Resume Next

When I deliver my work, I set the variable to false, thus hiding the errors only to the user and showing them during testing.

Also using it when doing something that may fail like calling the DataBodyRange of a ListObject that may be empty:

On Error Resume Next
Sheet1.ListObjects(1).DataBodyRange.Delete
On Error Goto 0

Instead of:

If Sheet1.ListObjects(1).ListRows.Count > 0 Then 
    Sheet1.ListObjects(1).DataBodyRange.Delete
End If

Or checking existence of an item in a collection:

On Error Resume Next
Err.Clear
Set auxiliarVar = collection(key)

' Check existence (if you try to retrieve a nonexistant key you get error number 5)
exists = (Err.Number <> 5)
  • >If not debugModeOn Then On Error Resume Next In this case it is better to use conditional compilation like #If Hide_Errors > 0 Then On Error Resume Next and set Hide_Errors in the VBA project properties Conditional Complication Arguments accordingly. – Aleksey F. Jun 6 '15 at 5:32
1

Beware the elephant trap:

I saw no mention of this in this discussion. [Access 2010]

How ACCESS/VBA handles errors in CLASS objects is determined by a configurable option:

VBA Code Editor > Tools > Options > General > Error Trapping:

enter image description here

1

I find the following to work best, called the central error handling approach.

Benefits

You have 2 modes of running your application: Debug and Production. In the Debug mode, the code will stop at any unexpected error and allow you to debug easily by jumping to the line where it occurred by pressing F8 twice. In the Production mode, a meaningful error message will get displayed to the user.

You can throw intentional errors like this, which will stop execution of the code with a message to the user:

Err.Raise vbObjectError, gsNO_DEBUG, "Some meaningful error message to the user"

Err.Raise vbObjectError, gsUSER_MESSAGE, "Some meaningful non-error message to the user"

'Or to exit in the middle of a call stack without a message:
Err.Raise vbObjectError, gsSILENT

Implementation

You need to "wrap" all subroutines and functions with any significant amount of code with the following headers and footers, making sure to specify ehCallTypeEntryPoint in all your entry points. Note the msModule constant as well, which needs to be put in all modules.

Option Explicit
Const msModule As String = "<Your Module Name>"

' This is an entry point 
Public Sub AnEntryPoint()
    Const sSOURCE As String = "AnEntryPoint"
    On Error GoTo ErrorHandler

    'Your code

ErrorExit:
    Exit Sub

ErrorHandler:
    If CentralErrorHandler(Err, ThisWorkbook, msModule, sSOURCE, ehCallTypeEntryPoint) Then
        Stop
        Resume
    Else
        Resume ErrorExit
    End If
End Sub

' This is any other subroutine or function that isn't an entry point
Sub AnyOtherSub()
    Const sSOURCE As String = "AnyOtherSub"
    On Error GoTo ErrorHandler

    'Your code

ErrorExit:
    Exit Sub

ErrorHandler:
    If CentralErrorHandler(Err, ThisWorkbook, msModule, sSOURCE) Then
        Stop
        Resume
    Else
        Resume ErrorExit
    End If
End Sub

The contents of the central error handler module is the following:

'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
' Comments: Error handler code.
'
'           Run SetDebugMode True to use debug mode (Dev mode)
'           It will be False by default (Production mode)
'
' Author:   Igor Popov
' Date:     13 Feb 2014
' Licence:  MIT
'
''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''

Option Explicit
Option Private Module

Private Const msModule As String = "MErrorHandler"

Public Const gsAPP_NAME As String = "<You Application Name>"

Public Const gsSILENT As String = "UserCancel"  'A silent error is when the user aborts an action, no message should be displayed
Public Const gsNO_DEBUG As String = "NoDebug"   'This type of error will display a specific message to the user in situation of an expected (provided-for) error.
Public Const gsUSER_MESSAGE As String = "UserMessage" 'Use this type of error to display an information message to the user

Private Const msDEBUG_MODE_COMPANY = "<Your Company>"
Private Const msDEBUG_MODE_SECTION = "<Your Team>"
Private Const msDEBUG_MODE_VALUE = "DEBUG_MODE"

Public Enum ECallType
    ehCallTypeRegular = 0
    ehCallTypeEntryPoint
End Enum

Public Function DebugMode() As Boolean
    DebugMode = CBool(GetSetting(msDEBUG_MODE_COMPANY, msDEBUG_MODE_SECTION, msDEBUG_MODE_VALUE, 0))
End Function

Public Sub SetDebugMode(Optional bMode As Boolean = True)
    SaveSetting msDEBUG_MODE_COMPANY, msDEBUG_MODE_SECTION, msDEBUG_MODE_VALUE, IIf(bMode, 1, 0)
End Sub

'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
' Comments: The central error handler for all functions
'           Displays errors to the user at the entry point level, or, if we're below the entry point, rethrows it upwards until the entry point is reached
'
'           Returns True to stop and debug unexpected errors in debug mode.
'
'           The function can be enhanced to log errors.
'
' Date          Developer           TDID    Comment
'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
' 13 Feb 2014   Igor Popov                  Created

Public Function CentralErrorHandler(ErrObj As ErrObject, Wbk As Workbook, ByVal sModule As String, ByVal sSOURCE As String, _
                                    Optional enCallType As ECallType = ehCallTypeRegular, Optional ByVal bRethrowError As Boolean = True) As Boolean

    Static ssModule As String, ssSource As String
    If Len(ssModule) = 0 And Len(ssSource) = 0 Then
        'Remember the module and the source of the first call to CentralErrorHandler
        ssModule = sModule
        ssSource = sSOURCE
    End If
    CentralErrorHandler = DebugMode And ErrObj.Source <> gsNO_DEBUG And ErrObj.Source <> gsUSER_MESSAGE And ErrObj.Source <> gsSILENT
    If CentralErrorHandler Then
        'If it's an unexpected error and we're going to stop in the debug mode, just write the error message to the immediate window for debugging
        Debug.Print "#Err: " & Err.Description
    ElseIf enCallType = ehCallTypeEntryPoint Then
        'If we have reached the entry point and it's not a silent error, display the message to the user in an error box
        If ErrObj.Source <> gsSILENT Then
            Dim sMsg As String: sMsg = ErrObj.Description
            If ErrObj.Source <> gsNO_DEBUG And ErrObj.Source <> gsUSER_MESSAGE Then sMsg = "Unexpected VBA error in workbook '" & Wbk.Name & "', module '" & ssModule & "', call '" & ssSource & "':" & vbCrLf & vbCrLf & sMsg
            MsgBox sMsg, vbOKOnly + IIf(ErrObj.Source = gsUSER_MESSAGE, vbInformation, vbCritical), gsAPP_NAME
        End If
    ElseIf bRethrowError Then
        'Rethrow the error to the next level up if bRethrowError is True (by Default).
        'Otherwise, do nothing as the calling function must be having special logic for handling errors.
        Err.Raise ErrObj.Number, ErrObj.Source, ErrObj.Description
    End If
End Function

To set yourself in the Debug mode, run the following in the Immediate window:

SetDebugMode True

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