263

I need to convert minutes to hours, rounded off to two decimal places. I also need to display only up to two numbers after the decimal point. So if I have minutes as 650, then hours should be 10.83.

Here's what I have so far:

Select round(Minutes/60.0,2) from ....

But in this case, if my minutes is, say, 630 - hours is 10.5000000. But I want it as 10.50 only (after rounding). How do I achieve this?

2

16 Answers 16

436

You could cast your result as numeric(x,2). Where x <= 38.

select
    round(630/60.0,2),
    cast(round(630/60.0,2) as numeric(36,2))

Returns

10.500000    10.50
7
  • 9
    Strange. SELECT ROUND(630/60.0, 2); gives me 10.50 already.
    – Ja͢ck
    Apr 30, 2012 at 7:54
  • 4
    @u07ch what is the purpose of using round() when you are already using a cast?
    – Ram
    Aug 23, 2014 at 12:20
  • 19
    @Ram The question didn't specify the sql server engine - which is why i highlighted the round v cast on its own. The convert to numeric doesn't do rounding in all engines so if the calculated number was 10.809 you would get 10.80 rather than the 10.81 the question required.
    – u07ch
    Aug 26, 2014 at 7:47
  • 8
    cast(630/60.0 as numeric(36,2)) is enougth 10,50
    – MrHIDEn
    Apr 24, 2015 at 20:29
  • 2
    in ms sql cast (150.755555 as numeric (16,2)); gives 150.76 Aug 4, 2016 at 5:59
95

With SQL Server 2012, you can use the built-in format function:

SELECT FORMAT(Minutes/60.0, 'N2')
4
  • 2
    Note that this introduces thousands separators as well, e.g. 1,757.47
    – 8128
    Jan 25, 2017 at 9:32
  • 15
    Using '0.00' rather than 'N2' gives two decimal places without also have the thousands separator.
    – 8128
    Jan 25, 2017 at 10:05
  • 2
    Seems to convert to string ? which screws up order by.
    – blissweb
    Mar 4, 2018 at 2:08
  • 2
    @blissweb Should not be a problem as you can order on the original column, not the output of the Format function.
    – Matten
    Mar 5, 2018 at 7:26
31

You can use:

select cast((630/60.0) as decimal(16,2))

in SQL Server

4
  • At least on DB2, this does not round the result.
    – not2savvy
    Aug 5, 2020 at 15:54
  • That is a bold statement. What was it tested on? Jul 29, 2021 at 21:39
  • decimal(16,2) doesn't limit decimal places to 2. Oct 21, 2021 at 2:27
  • 1
    @julianjoseph it does in SQL-Server.
    – bautista
    Jan 12 at 8:45
13
Declare @number float = 35.44987665;
Select round(@number,2) 
3
  • 7
    Consider adding a bit of an explanation to your answer. May 4, 2016 at 13:41
  • 3
    In case of decimal (10,6) what will happen? Dec 19, 2017 at 6:12
  • 1
    In MS SQL Server this will produce the exact problem in question. The output will be 35.44000000 Oct 1, 2020 at 4:54
11
CAST(QuantityLevel AS NUMERIC(18,2))
2
  • 6
    Welcome to Stack Overflow! Thank you for the code snippet, which might provide some limited, immediate help. A proper explanation would greatly improve its long-term value by describing why this is a good solution to the problem, and would make it more useful to future readers with other similar questions. Please edit your answer to add some explanation, including the assumptions you've made.
    – sepehr
    Oct 25, 2018 at 15:08
  • nice this one should one of the best answe so far.. why I said that... Feb 4, 2021 at 5:53
6

Convert your number to a Numeric or Decimal.

Replace your query with the following.

SQL Server

Select Convert(Numeric(38, 2), Minutes/60.0) from ....

MySQL:

Select Convert(Minutes/60.0, Decimal(65, 2)) from ....

The Cast function is a wrapper for the Convert function. Couple that with SQL being an interpreted language and the result is that even though the two functions produce the same results, there is slightly more going on behind the scenes in the Cast function.

Using the Convert function is a small saving, but small savings multiply. The parameters for Numeric and Decimal (38, 2) and (65, 2) represent the maximum precision level and decimal places to use.

1
  • 1
    Thank you for being the only person to provide SQL Server and MySQL solutions, AND provide an explanation Oct 1, 2020 at 5:13
4
DECLARE @porcentaje FLOAT

SET @porcentaje = (CONVERT(DECIMAL,ABS(8700)) * 100) / CONVERT(DECIMAL,ABS(37020))

SELECT @porcentaje
4

Try this:

    SELECT CAST(ROUND([Amount 1]/60,2) AS DECIMAL(10,2)) as TOTAL
4

Following query is useful and simple-

declare @floatExchRate float;
set @floatExchRate=(select convert(decimal(10, 2), 0.2548712))
select  @floatExchRate

Gives output as 0.25.

2
  • What was it tested on? Jul 29, 2021 at 21:41
  • @Peter Mortensen, On MS SQL SERVER Aug 6, 2021 at 5:45
3

This works in both with PostgreSQL and Oracle:

SELECT ename, sal, round(((sal * .15 + comm) /12),2)
FROM emp where job = 'SALESMAN'
3

Whatever you use in denomination should be in decimal. For example, 1548/100 will give 15.00.

If we replace 100 with 100.0 in our example then we will get 15.48

select 1548/100
15.00000

select 1548/100.0
15.4800

0
1
2

As an add-on to the answers below, when using INT or non-decimal datatypes in your formulas, remember to multiply the value by 1 and the number of decimals you prefer.

I.e. - TotalPackages is an INT, and so is the denominator TotalContainers, but I want my result to have up to six decimal places.

Thus:

((m.TotalPackages * 1.000000) / m.TotalContainers) AS Packages,
1

The following snippet might help you:

select SUBSTR(ENDDTTM,1, 9), extract(DAY FROM (ENDDTTM)), ENDDTTM, BEGINDTTM,  (ENDDTTM - BEGINDTTM),substr(BEGINDTTM, 1,15), substr((ENDDTTM - BEGINDTTM), 12, 8),
round((substr((ENDDTTM - BEGINDTTM), 12, 2)* 3600 + substr((ENDDTTM - BEGINDTTM), 15, 2)*60 +  substr((ENDDTTM - BEGINDTTM), 18, 2)),2) as seconds,
round((substr((ENDDTTM - BEGINDTTM), 12, 2)* 60 + substr((ENDDTTM - BEGINDTTM), 15, 2) +  substr((ENDDTTM - BEGINDTTM), 18, 2)/60 ), 2)as minutes,
round((substr((ENDDTTM - BEGINDTTM), 12, 2) + substr((ENDDTTM - BEGINDTTM), 15, 2)/60 +  substr((ENDDTTM - BEGINDTTM), 18, 2)/3600 ),2)  as hours
0
0

I find the STR function the cleanest means of accomplishing this.

SELECT STR(ceiling(123.415432875), 6, 2)
1
0

To round up to x decimal places:

SET @Result = CEILING(@Value * POWER(10, @Decimals)) / POWER(10, @Decimals)

where @Value is the value of the item to be rounded, @Decimals is the number of decimal places, for example, two in this instance.

0

This worked for me:

SELECT FORMAT(Minutes/60.0, '0.00')

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