172

How do you find current database's transaction level on SQL Server?

286

Run this:

SELECT CASE transaction_isolation_level 
WHEN 0 THEN 'Unspecified' 
WHEN 1 THEN 'ReadUncommitted' 
WHEN 2 THEN 'ReadCommitted' 
WHEN 3 THEN 'Repeatable' 
WHEN 4 THEN 'Serializable' 
WHEN 5 THEN 'Snapshot' END AS TRANSACTION_ISOLATION_LEVEL 
FROM sys.dm_exec_sessions 
where session_id = @@SPID

docs.microsoft.com reference for the constant values.

9
  • 9
    This one is not accurate if the isolation level is "read_commited_snapshot". In this case, it will only show "Readcommited". May 28 '13 at 17:07
  • 9
    @GaTechThomas , READ_COMMITTED_SNAPSHOT is not isolation level, it is a database's option permitting to change the behavior of ReadDCommitted isolation level database-wide Dec 11 '13 at 7:29
  • 1
    @user960567, IIRC, Scott Ivey's answer would give those results. Dec 15 '13 at 19:13
  • 3
    @zzzeek - That's what you get for using a database that has been obsolete for twelve years. Aug 1 '17 at 8:15
  • 2
    I understand the technicality of READ COMMITTED SNAPSHOT not being it's own distinctive isolation level but this will catch people out and did catch me out. Also MS themselves state it as an isolation level in the TABLE shown further down this page before the examples start so this answer could be improved by being more pragmatic and being in line with MS remarks docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/t-sql/statements/… Aug 25 at 11:32
57

just run DBCC useroptions and you'll get something like this:

Set Option                  Value
--------------------------- --------------
textsize                    2147483647
language                    us_english
dateformat                  mdy
datefirst                   7
lock_timeout                -1
quoted_identifier           SET
arithabort                  SET
ansi_null_dflt_on           SET
ansi_warnings               SET
ansi_padding                SET
ansi_nulls                  SET
concat_null_yields_null     SET
isolation level             read committed
1
  • 1
    and it points out "read committed snapshot" when active (see RC snapshot vs locked), at least on SQL Server 2008 Apr 28 '17 at 20:04
26
SELECT CASE  
          WHEN transaction_isolation_level = 1 
             THEN 'READ UNCOMMITTED' 
          WHEN transaction_isolation_level = 2 
               AND is_read_committed_snapshot_on = 1 
             THEN 'READ COMMITTED SNAPSHOT' 
          WHEN transaction_isolation_level = 2 
               AND is_read_committed_snapshot_on = 0 THEN 'READ COMMITTED' 
          WHEN transaction_isolation_level = 3 
             THEN 'REPEATABLE READ' 
          WHEN transaction_isolation_level = 4 
             THEN 'SERIALIZABLE' 
          WHEN transaction_isolation_level = 5 
             THEN 'SNAPSHOT' 
          ELSE NULL
       END AS TRANSACTION_ISOLATION_LEVEL 
FROM   sys.dm_exec_sessions AS s
       CROSS JOIN sys.databases AS d
WHERE  session_id = @@SPID
  AND  d.database_id = DB_ID();
1
  • 6
    Please also elaborate on the code to be more educative.
    – lpapp
    Feb 23 '14 at 10:59
25
DECLARE   @UserOptions TABLE(SetOption varchar(100), Value varchar(100))
DECLARE   @IsolationLevel varchar(100)

INSERT    @UserOptions
EXEC('DBCC USEROPTIONS WITH NO_INFOMSGS')

SELECT    @IsolationLevel = Value
FROM      @UserOptions
WHERE     SetOption = 'isolation level'

-- Do whatever you want with the variable here...  
PRINT     @IsolationLevel
2
  • +1 since its also prints 'snapshot' when it being used along w/ read committed (and not the default shared lock mechanism) Feb 26 '14 at 14:48
  • this is overkill, just do DBCC USEROPTIONS as thiagoh says Apr 28 '17 at 20:01
10

If you are talking about the current transaction nesting level, then you would use @@TRANCOUNT.

If you are talking about transaction isolation level, use DBCC USEROPTIONS and look for an option of isolation level. If it isn't set, it's read committed.

2
  • 6
    Also keep in mind DBCC USEROPTIONS is an awesome option for finding your SESSION'S isolation level, but it can be tricky - if your code changes the isolation level per transaction, those periods of time where the isolation level is different from the session default can be hard to capture. For example, if you open your session with isolation level x, but change the isolation level to y for the duration of a specific transaction within the session, the DBCC USEROPTIONS will not give you visibility into that if called outside of that transaction.
    – DCaugs
    Oct 18 '13 at 14:16
  • 1
    In SQL Server 2012 "isolation level" of DBCC USEROPTIONS is set to "read committed" Dec 12 '13 at 7:16
0
SELECT CASE  
    WHEN transaction_isolation_level = 0 THEN 'Unspecified' 
    WHEN transaction_isolation_level = 1 THEN 'Read Uncommitted' 
    WHEN transaction_isolation_level = 2 AND d.snapshot_isolation_state_desc = 'OFF' THEN 'Read Committed' 
    WHEN transaction_isolation_level = 2 AND d.snapshot_isolation_state_desc = 'ON' AND d.is_read_committed_snapshot_on = 1 THEN 'Snapshot Read Committed'  
    WHEN transaction_isolation_level = 2 AND d.snapshot_isolation_state_desc = 'ON' AND d.is_read_committed_snapshot_on = 0 THEN 'Snapshot'  
    WHEN transaction_isolation_level = 3 THEN 'Repeatable Read' 
    WHEN transaction_isolation_level = 4 THEN 'Serializable' END AS TRANSACTION_ISOLATION_LEVEL,
    d.is_read_committed_snapshot_on,
    d.snapshot_isolation_state_desc
FROM sys.dm_exec_sessions 
       CROSS JOIN sys.databases AS d
where session_id = @@SPID
  AND  d.database_id = DB_ID();
1
  • 3
    Your answer very barely differs from this answer, which was posted over 7 years ago. You should edit your answer to include more details about your solution and/or an explanation of how this code block answers the question. This helps to provide context and makes your answer much more useful for future readers. Jun 10 at 1:59

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