3

I have a C++ serial port class that has a none blocking and a blocking mode for read operations. For blocking mode:

COMMTIMEOUTS cto;
GetCommTimeouts(m_hFile,&cto);
// Set the new timeouts
cto.ReadIntervalTimeout = 0;
cto.ReadTotalTimeoutConstant = 0;
cto.ReadTotalTimeoutMultiplier = 0;
SetCommTimeouts(m_hFile,&cto)

For non blocking mode:

COMMTIMEOUTS cto;
GetCommTimeouts(m_hFile,&cto);
// Set the new timeouts
cto.ReadIntervalTimeout = MAXDWORD;
cto.ReadTotalTimeoutConstant = 0;
cto.ReadTotalTimeoutMultiplier = 0;
SetCommTimeouts(m_hFile,&cto)

I would like to add another mode that waits for any number of bytes and read them.

From MSDN COMMTIMEOUTS structure:

If an application sets ReadIntervalTimeout and ReadTotalTimeoutMultiplier to MAXDWORD and sets ReadTotalTimeoutConstant to a value greater than zero and less than MAXDWORD, one of the following occurs when the ReadFile function is called:

  • If there are any bytes in the input buffer, ReadFile returns immediately with the bytes in the buffer.
  • If there are no bytes in the input buffer, ReadFile waits until a byte arrives and then returns immediately.
  • If no bytes arrive within the time specified by ReadTotalTimeoutConstant, ReadFile times out.

This looks in code like this:

COMMTIMEOUTS cto;
GetCommTimeouts(m_hFile,&cto);
// Set the new timeouts
cto.ReadIntervalTimeout = 100;
cto.ReadTotalTimeoutConstant = MAXDWORD;
cto.ReadTotalTimeoutMultiplier = MAXDWORD;
SetCommTimeouts(m_hFile,&cto)

But this returns emidiately on the first byte. This is a problem since I am reading the port in a loop and the handling of a byte is so fast that the next time I read the port, only another byte is available. The end result is that I am reading one byte at a time in a loop and using 100% of the core running that thread.

I would like to use the cto.ReadIntervalTimeout like in the MSDN documentation but still wait until at least one byte is available. Does anyone have an idea?

Thanks.

5

The behavior you want will come from:

cto.ReadIntervalTimeout = 10;
cto.ReadTotalTimeoutConstant = 0;
cto.ReadTotalTimeoutMultiplier = 0;

It blocks arbitrarily long for the first byte (total timeout is disabled by setting the latter two fields to zero, per the documentation), then reads up to the buffer size as long as data is streaming in. If there's a 10ms gap in the data, it will return with what has been received so far.

1

If you're using 100% (or even close to it) of the CPU, it sounds like you're doing something wrong elsewhere. As I showed in a previous answer, for years I've used code with the timeouts all set to 1. I initially set it that way just as a wild guess at something that might at least sort of work, with the intent of tuning it later. It's worked well enough that I've never gotten around to tuning it at all. Just for example, it'll read input from my GPS (about the only thing I have that even imitates using a serial port any more) using an almost immeasurably tiny amount of CPU time -- after hours of reading a constant stream of data from the GPS, it still shows 0:00:00 seconds of CPU time used (and I can't see any difference in CPU usage whether it's running or not).

Now, I'll certainly grant that a GPS isn't (even close to) the fastest serial device around, but we're still talking about ~100% vs. ~0%. That's clearly a pretty serious difference.

4
  • I tried your suggestion, but it only helped a little. The CPU core doing the work fluctuated from almost nothing to 50% to 100% and back again quite randomly.
    – sprite
    May 1 '12 at 9:25
  • 1
    Well, what are you doing to read the port? I'm sorry to say this, but you're the only one getting this problem :( Handling serial ports uses so little CPU that it's difficult to measure, just like @Jerry says. May 2 '12 at 14:06
  • @JerryCoffin is right -- If you are reading one byte at a time and blocking on that byte you should not get close to 100% CPU. I have code running many serial ports one byte at a time continuously, along with many other things and see nothing like 100% CPU.
    – janm
    Nov 24 '14 at 3:26
  • Setting all timeouts to 1 means the behaviour depends on the buffer size (e.g. if you pass buffer size of 8000 to ReadFile then it will wait 8 seconds).
    – M.M
    May 3 '15 at 6:31
0
if (dwEvtMask == EV_RXCHAR )
{
   Sleep(1);
   if (dwLength > 2)
    {
      Sleep(1);
      Readfile( m_Serial->m_hCom, data,dwLength, &dwBytesRead, &Overlapped);
      pDlg->PostMessage(WM_RECEIVE,0,0);
    }
}
2
  • 2
    Whatever your Timeout setting, Try add Sleep(1); to your Thread before Readfile() , This prevent High CPU Usage 100% on Thread..Instead Loop Check Forever. its work for me!
    – HERU
    Dec 6 '12 at 4:52
  • Sleep is unnecessary if you set the right timeout. And -1 for using EV_RXCHAR.
    – Ben Voigt
    Sep 24 '14 at 1:27

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