6

I'm trying to find out it there is a way of finding the largest connected component in a adj matrix graph. Such as this:

0000000110
0001100000
0000000000
0100000010
0100000100
0000000100
0000000000
1000110000
1001000000
0000000000

I've Google'd the problem and am struggling to find anything, I've also read though the wiki article on graph theory and no joy. I assume their must be an algorithm out there to solve this problem. Can anybody point me in the right direction and give me some pointers on what I should be doing to solve this myself?

4

Pick a starting point and start "walking" to other nodes until you have exhausted. Do this until you have found all components. This will run in O(n) where n is the size of the graph.

A skeleton of a solution in Python:

class Node(object):
    def __init__(self, index, neighbors):
        self.index = index
        # A set of indices (integers, not Nodes)
        self.neighbors = set(neighbors)

    def add_neighbor(self, neighbor):
        self.neighbors.add(neighbor)


class Component(object):
    def __init__(self, nodes):
        self.nodes = nodes
        self.adjacent_nodes = set()
        for node in nodes:
            self.adjacent_nodes.add(node.index)
            self.adjacent_nodes.update(node.neighbors)

    @property
    def size(self):
        return len(self.nodes)

    @property
    def node_indices(self):
        return set(node.index for node in self.nodes)

    @property
    def is_saturated(self):
        return self.node_indices == self.adjacent_nodes

    def add_node(self, node):
        self.nodes.append(node)
        self.adjacent_nodes.update(node.neighbors)


adj_matrix = [[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0],
              [0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
              [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
              [0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0],
              [0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0],
              [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0],
              [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
              [1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0],
              [1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
              [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]]
matrix_size = len(adj_matrix)

nodes = {}
for index in range(matrix_size):
    neighbors = [neighbor for neighbor, value in enumerate(adj_matrix[index])
                 if value == 1]
    nodes[index] = Node(index, neighbors)

components = []
index, node = nodes.popitem()
component = Component([node])
while nodes:
    if not component.is_saturated:
        missing_node_index = component.adjacent_nodes.difference(component.node_indices).pop()
        missing_node = nodes.pop(missing_node_index)
        component.add_node(missing_node)
    else:
        components.append(component)

        index, node = nodes.popitem()
        component = Component([node])

# Final component needs to be appended as well
components.append(component)

print max([component.size for component in components])
  • So something like a depth-first search could be used for this? – JasonMortonNZ May 1 '12 at 1:50
  • 1
    Yes. I'll try to outline a solution for you in Python, as this is a fun problem. The solution I had in mind is more breadth-first though. – bossylobster May 1 '12 at 1:50
  • 1
    DFS and BFS are equivalent for this particular purpose. I would go with BFS because it's ever so slightly easier to implement (queue instead of a stack), but any CS major worth their salt should be able to code both. Refer to the bible (CLRS Introduction to Algorithms) if you get stuck. – Li-aung Yip May 1 '12 at 2:11
  • Thanks for python interpretation @bossylobster . It's been an excellent help. – JasonMortonNZ May 1 '12 at 2:53
6
  1. Apply a connected components algorithm.

    For an undirected graph, just pick a node and do a breadth-first search. If there are any nodes left over after the first BFS, pick one of the left-overs and do another BFS. (You get one connected component per BFS.)

    Note that directed graphs require a slightly stronger algorithm to find the strongly connected components. Kosaraju's algorithm springs to mind.

  2. Count the number of nodes in each of the connected components from (1). Pick the largest one.

  • This is an undirected graph im applying it to. Thanks for you help. – JasonMortonNZ May 1 '12 at 2:51
1
#include<iostream>
#include<cstdlib>
#include<list>
using namespace std;
class GraphDfs
{
    private:
        int v;
        list<int> *adj;
        int *label;
        int DFS(int v,int size_connected)
        {

            size_connected++;
            cout<<(v+1)<<"   ";
            label[v]=1;
            list<int>::iterator i;
            for(i=adj[v].begin();i!=adj[v].end();++i)
            {
                if(label[*i]==0)
                {
                    size_connected=DFS(*i,size_connected);

                }

            }
            return size_connected;
        }
    public:
        GraphDfs(int k)
        {
            v=k;
            adj=new list<int>[v];
            label=new int[v];
            for(int i=0;i<v;i++)
            {
                label[i]=0;
            }
        }
        void DFS()
        {
            int flag=0;
            int size_connected=0;
            int max=0;
            for(int i=0;i<v;i++)
            {   
                size_connected=0;
                if(label[i]==0)
                {
                    size_connected=DFS(i,size_connected);
                    max=size_connected>max?size_connected:max;
                    cout<<size_connected<<endl;
                    flag++;
                }
            }
            cout<<endl<<"The number of connected compnenets are "<<flag<<endl;
            cout<<endl<<"The size of largest connected component is "<<max<<endl;
            //cout<<cycle;
        }

        void insert()
        {
            int u=0;int a=0;int flag=1;
            while(flag==1)
            {   cout<<"Enter the edges in (u,v) form"<<endl;

                cin>>u>>a;
                adj[a-1].push_back(u-1);
                adj[u-1].push_back(a-1);
                cout<<"Do you want to enter more??1/0 "<<endl;
                cin>>flag;

            }
        }       
};
int main()
{
    cout<<"Enter the number of vertices"<<endl;
    int v=0;
    cin>>v;
    GraphDfs g(v);
    g.insert();
    g.DFS();
    system("Pause");     
}

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