57

Since the vast majority of monitors are 16-bit color or more, including mobile devices, does it make sense to even consider web-safe colors when choosing color schemes? Or is it something that ought to be relegated to history as a piece of trivia?

For those of you that don't know what web-safe colors are:

Another set of 216 color values is commonly considered to be the "web-safe" color palette, developed at a time when many computer displays were only capable of displaying 256 colors. A set of colors was needed that could be shown without dithering on 256-color displays; the number 216 was chosen partly because computer operating systems customarily reserved sixteen to twenty colors for their own use; it was also selected because it allows exactly six shades each of red, green, and blue (6 × 6 × 6 = 216).

The list of colors is often presented as if it has special properties that render them immune to dithering. In fact, on 256-color displays applications can set a palette of any selection of colors that they choose, dithering the rest. These colors were chosen specifically because they matched the palettes selected by the then leading browser applications. [Wikipedia]

  • 9
    Interesting it seems to be so far in the past that a lot of the readers didn't quite get the point of the question. – Kevin Peterson Jun 24 '09 at 22:03
  • 2
    When we did Windows 3.1 games, we had to set the palette up to allow all those system colors. It was a similar problem. I wonder how many SO participants are too young to remember windows 3.1 :-) – Nosredna Jun 25 '09 at 15:10
  • What about non-for-profits that need to be Bobby compliant? – user704739 Apr 12 '11 at 19:20
  • I'm thinking it's pretty irrelevant for them. As far as I can find there is no such thing as Bobby compliance. Bobby was a tool (suite of tests) developed for assessing whether a website was accessible or not. It's passed through a couple of hands and is now dead in the hands of IBM: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobby_%28software%29 – Gavin Miller Apr 12 '11 at 19:32

13 Answers 13

65

For me web safe color palette is no longer primary concern. Optimize for the largest target audience.

According to w3schools site visitors:

  • In January 2009 1% of site visitors had 256 color displays, 95% of users had 24 or 32 bit.
  • [Update] In January 2015 0.5% had 256 colours, 0.5% had 24 bit and 99% had 32 bit

I found similar numbers from a business app site that I look after:

32-bit  79.01%  

24-bit  15.64%  

16-bit  5.27%   

8-bit   0.08%
  • 14
    Best answer because it references real data – adolf garlic Jun 25 '09 at 7:21
  • 3
    It also depends on your target audience. For most people, this is probably not an issue. For a site catering to a tech-savvy crowd, probably even less so. I guess it's possible that there is a website out there that caters to a demographic that is statistically less likely to have modern equipment. – Beska Sep 1 '09 at 17:18
  • I find it extremely difficult to believe that any human-driven computer visiting the w3schools website is legitimately limited to using 8-bit color. I wonder how they are detecting this? If I change my color profile to 8-bit and browse to their site does that skew the statistics? – Dan Bechard Jun 21 '16 at 19:47
  • I did not expect that there where still people called Adolf after WWII. – Roel May 10 '17 at 12:14
20

I don't think web safe colors are relevant any more. To me, a much bigger problem for smartphones are all the fixed-width 960-pixel wide web pages.

  • 1
    What's the matter, your smart phone doesn't have a horizontal scroll bar? – Dan Bechard Jun 21 '16 at 19:48
15

I think the most important thing when choosing a colour palette is keeping in mind colour-blindness. There are a few different types that I know of, but the main thing is making sure that you have enough contrast between colours.

For example green text on a red background might be easier for some to read, but very difficult or maybe impossible for others (5-10% of males!), especially if the values of the colours are close.

  • 2
    Yes. I'd suggest creating a custom palette at paletton.com with the simulation for "deuteranopia" turned on. (If that's too daunting, "deuteranomaly" should work for most people.) Colour Contrast Analyser is a great free tool as well. Consider just using shades of blue, yellow, green, magenta, and gray. If you must use red, try to keep it pinkish or orangish and use the "protanopia" sim to check it. – Jon Coombs Nov 6 '15 at 4:50
  • @JonCoombs Alternatively, just don't use colors to relay important UI information. It doesn't matter if color-blind users can't tell the difference if the difference is purely aesthetic. – Dan Bechard Jun 21 '16 at 19:50
7

For those of us (like me) that didn't know exactly what web safe colors are, they were

developed at a time when many computer displays were only capable of displaying 256 colors. A set of colors was needed that could be shown without dithering on 256-color displays; the number 216 was chosen partly because computer operating systems customarily reserved sixteen to twenty colors for their own use; it was also selected because it allows exactly six shades each of red, green, and blue (6 × 6 × 6 = 216).

The list of colors is often presented as if it has special properties that render them immune to dithering. In fact, on 256-color displays applications can set a palette of any selection of colors that they choose, dithering the rest. These colors were chosen specifically because they matched the palettes selected by the then leading browser applications.

It's hard to imagine any of this applying to today's modern displays, since almost nobody runs their display in 256 colors anymore (unless perhaps they are playing an old version of Leisure Suit Larry).

  • 1
    @Robert - I hadn't realized people wouldn't know what that was. I grabbed your reference and grafted it into the question. – Gavin Miller Jun 24 '09 at 21:44
  • I knew what they were, I had just never gotten around to finding out exactly why they exist, and I hadn't considered them important in my current web development, an admittedly naive position. – Robert Harvey Jun 24 '09 at 21:47
3

In my opinion, its history.

  • its history -1 for grammar. Just kidding. – Dan Bechard Jun 21 '16 at 19:53
3

It depends what you mean by web safe colours.

In terms of 16bit colour it's probably not worth worrying about. However Colours do not appear the same across devices. This can lead to all sorts of problems particularly if a designers gamma settings are different to your particular monitor set up.

So you still need to test your design across multiple set ups.

2

According to research, even the web safe colors were not web safe. It was an interesting idea while it was relevant, thankfully that's over now.

1

Web safe colors are pretty much not a problem anymore unless you are dealing with consumers that will have legacy (think > 10 year old) video display equipment.

  • It takes an amazingly old monitor to cause problems. Video cards are a more common limitation of colour depth. – Quentin Jun 24 '09 at 21:37
  • I've seen people go to 16-bit depth for the sake of a higher frame rate, but I don't see people go to 256-colors anymore. – Nosredna Jun 24 '09 at 21:38
  • David - Thanks for the update - Fixed – Brian Jun 24 '09 at 21:39
1

Yes, it's definitely a thing of the past. Place its importance right next to your marquee tags.

1

IMHO the point is really moot. Colors that aren't web safe are dithered anyway. It may not look the best in 256-color modes but as long as functional elements of the page/applications are not dependent on those colors it will not disturb the user experience that much.

Also most users surfing in 256-color modes will be aware of the fact colors will be dithered as I don't think that a lot of sites adhere to the web-safe colorschemes anymore.

0

Some colors do not display on some mobile devices. (trying to make a list)

The title bars are supposed to be a blue fade from CSS:

background: linear-gradient(to bottom, #0099CC1, #0033CC) repeat-x scroll 0 0 #006DCC;

On many devices the background is not visible, and the header looks like white-on-white.

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    That is probably due to the fact that the Linear-gradient is not supported by that particular browser. Allways use a fallback in cases where you need to support older browsers/devices. – Roberto De Vivo Aug 21 '15 at 11:15
0

Since, browser safe colors are no more relevant asking a new question and posting it's answer does not look genius. So, I'm just trying to explain the tip to determine browser safe colors just by looking at it's hex code

For a hex color #xxyyzz, the color is browser safe if

  • For pairs:

    • position 12 i.e xx values are same
    • position 34 i.e yy values are same
    • position 56 i.e zz values are same
  • Allowed values are

    • 0
    • 3
    • 6
    • 9
    • C
    • F
0

It's still important if your target very poor to developing nations, such as countries in here south asia. I personally have a full blown IPS monitor with Windows 10, so it's not a problem to me, but we are minorities, and majority of them have old hardware/computers/operating systems except mobiles phones, as it's cheap to buy a latest mobile phone, but computer hardware are expensive due to the taxes/ import cost etc.. compared to the salary of an average person.I personally witnessed many people still use old Windows XP, 98 PC with 256 colors on Pentium 4 processors. So if you target such audience, it's better to use web safe colors, but if you are doing a business it's not worth, as they are less likely to be your customers, but if you are doing an information site, a blog, an activist site that people can read and get informed without having to pay for something then always use fallback theme or something with web safe colors. since such people are mostly on windows xp/98, try to detect the OS, and if the user is from such operating systems, then use the fallback theme.

So remember that, most of people in this world are poor, and most of people still use old hardware and technologies. If you want to cover them all without working a lot hard on your current theme, then always use fallback themes. One for old mobiles, one for old desktop displays, one for modern displays and modern mobiles (responsive)

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