19

Is there a way to reuse the same enum value in separate types? I'd like to be able to something like the following:

enum DeviceState { UNKNOWN, ACTIVE, DISABLED, NOTPRESENT, UNPLUGGED };
enum DeviceType { UNKNOWN, PLAYBACK, RECORDING };

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    DeviceState deviceState = DeviceState::UNKNOWN;
    DeviceType deviceType = DeviceType::UNKNOWN;
    return 0;
}

This makes sense to me, but not to the C++ compiler- it complains: error C2365: 'UNKNOWN' : redefinition; previous definition was 'enumerator' on line 2 of the above. Is there a correct way of doing this, or am I supposed to always use unique enum values? I can't imagine this is always possible to guarantee if I'm including someone else's code.

21

You can, and should, include your enums in a namespace:

namespace DeviceState
{
    enum DeviceState{ UNKNOWN, ACTIVE, DISABLED, NOTPRESENT, UNPLUGGED };
}
namespace DeviceType
{
    enum DeviceType{ UNKNOWN, PLAYBACK, RECORDING };
}

//...

DeviceType::DeviceType x = DeviceType::UNKNOWN;
  • Thanks Luchian. Please could you correct my example for me. I'm not sure how to declare a variable using namespaces as you describe above. – Dan Stevens May 2 '12 at 9:55
  • If I declare a variable as DeviceState deviceState = DeviceState::UNKNOWN;, I get a compiler error:'DeviceState' : illegal use of namespace identifier in expression – Dan Stevens May 2 '12 at 9:58
  • @IAmAI ok then you need to also name the enum. – Luchian Grigore May 2 '12 at 10:03
  • 1
    Luchian - would you know why this is the way it is (or why the rules the way they are)? It seems silly to me to declare a separate namespace, especially for those who already have a namespace and place the enum within a class. I guess I fail to see what's ambiguous about DeviceState::UNKNOWN and DeviceType::UNKNOWN. – jww Nov 25 '13 at 5:37
  • @noloader because you can address enum values without the enum qualifier. I.e. you could just write UNKNOWN, in which case it'd be ambiguous. – Luchian Grigore Nov 25 '13 at 8:17
30

For those using C++11, you may prefer to use:

enum class Foo

instead of just:

enum Foo

This provides similar syntax and benefits from as namespaces. In your case, the syntax would be:

enum class DeviceState { UNKNOWN, ACTIVE, DISABLED, NOTPRESENT, UNPLUGGED };
DeviceState deviceState = DeviceState::UNKNOWN;

Note that this is strongly typed so you will need to manually cast them to ints (or anything else).

  • 2
    Thank you, having to use the accepted answer of putting a named enum within a namespace would have been extremely ugly. – David Ching Apr 23 at 23:00

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