2

In many algorithms for graph, the connections of desired results are normally stored in a parent array.

For example, in the BFS or DFS, or the minimum spanning tree, or the shortest path, we store each vertex's parent in parent[].

My question is that if I only have such a parent[], how can I easily get the path between arbitrary vertices, say, in O(n)? Note that it doesn't matter that it is a BFS or DFS or something, what matters is the only parent[] I get form a graph algorithm.

I can easily get the path if one of the vertices is the ancestor of the other, otherwise I can only trace back via parent[] from one vertex to the root, and do it again for the other vertex, then check at which ancestor their paths (to the root) merge. And this results in O(n^2) since I have to compare each ancestor of one vertex to every ancestor of another vertex to seek for a merge point.

Anyone can help?

  • You can eliminate the complexity of seeking the merge point if you use a bool array A of size N, when you go from vertex i to the root, mark A[i] = true for each vertex along the way. When you go from vertex j to the root, if A[i] == true, that is the merge point (the first such vertex). – svinja May 2 '12 at 11:35
  • @svinja Yeah, I think your approach is correct although it involves O(n) space. – Jackson Tale May 2 '12 at 11:38
  • @svinja, could you please change your comment to an answer, I will mark it as the correct one. – Jackson Tale May 2 '12 at 11:52
  • Done. <character limit> – svinja May 2 '12 at 11:56
3

This problems sounds like a problem of finding the intersecting node from two intersecting linked lists. Please, check this solution Finding the intersecting node from two intersecting linked lists

  • Yep this is the best solution, O(1) space unlike mine. – svinja May 2 '12 at 12:09
  • Yeah it is the best solution for this question. @svinja I will mark this one as correct as it would give other people good information if they have similar questions. Hope you don't mind. Any way I will vote your answer. – Jackson Tale May 2 '12 at 12:12
  • Yeah it is the best solution so it should be the marked one. :D – svinja May 2 '12 at 12:13
5

You can eliminate the complexity of seeking the merge point if you use a bool array A of size N, when you go from vertex i to the root, mark A[i] = true for each vertex along the way. When you go from vertex j to the root, if A[i] == true, that is the merge point (the first such vertex).

1
// print the path between v1 and v2
w1 = v1
while w1 != root:
  ++n
  w1 = w1.parent

w2 = v2
while w2 != root:
  ++m
  w2 = w2.parent

if (m < n):
  swap(v1, v2)
  swap(m, n)

(m - n) times do:
  print v2
  v2 = v2.parent

while v1 != v2:
  print v2
  stack.push(v1)
  v1 = v1.parent
  v2 = v2.parent

while not stack.empty:
  print stack.pop
1

Finding that path between x,y in tree T:
You can do this in time O(k), 'k' being the length of the shortest path between them. instead of O(n) by storing an integer aux with value 0 in each node.

Climb up `x`'s and `y`'s ancestors simultaneously.  
Make each of `x`'s ancestors' aux = aux + 1  
Make each of `y`'s ancestors' aux = aux + 2

Denote by z the first common ancestor between them. Note that the path xz concatenated with zy will give you the shortest path xy.

If y's ancestor has aux=3 or if x's ancestor does, then you've reached z.

You would probably have to fix that to account for the case when one of them is an ancestor of the other... Also printing the vertices in order might require you to put x's ancestors into a stack and y's ancestors into a queue and then pop them out at the end.

0

As you said, you can easily get the path from the root to any vertex. If you need the path from any other vertex, you have to restart you search with that vertex as root. This is not an O(n)-approach, but it seems to be the best you can get. (Consider the case when the way along some edge doesn't have the same weight as the way along the same edge backwards, or doesn't exist at all.)

  • I think it is not "from the root to any vertex", instead, it should be "path from any vertex to the root". It is backwards. – Jackson Tale May 2 '12 at 11:25
  • @Jackson: it depends on what your search is considering. I am used to searching from the root, but it's a matter of taste: just reverse all the arrows in one of the searches, and you get another one. – Vlad May 2 '12 at 11:29
  • Vald, I think maybe my question is not clear. So now assume that I am given just a parent array for a MST, no other information is given. How can I get the path between any two vertices in the MST in O(n)? – Jackson Tale May 2 '12 at 11:40
  • @Jackson: well, I think that there is no way except rerunning the search with other root. – Vlad May 2 '12 at 11:45
  • How about @svinja's comment above? – Jackson Tale May 2 '12 at 11:53
0

The simpliest way is to use a stack. Something like this:

def getpath(parent, first, last):
     path = []
     while first != last:
         if last == None: # there isn't a path between first and last
             return None
         path.append(last)
         last = parent[last]
     path.append(first)
     path.reverse()
     return path
  • I don't think your code is right. Your code works only if last is first's ancestor. But it might not be – Jackson Tale May 2 '12 at 11:36
  • Ok, so you can try to get path from last to first. Asymptotic estimate does not change. – Aligus May 2 '12 at 11:39
  • No, I don't mean that. for example, R is U's parent, R is also V's parent, your code don't get the path U-R-V, right? – Jackson Tale May 2 '12 at 11:42
  • I've meant the following situation: you made BFS from some vertex and now want to get path from this vertex to any another. It's traditional using of BFS. It's my mistake. Sorry. – Aligus May 2 '12 at 11:47
  • No, I am sorry. it is my fault that I didn't say it clearly. – Jackson Tale May 2 '12 at 11:50

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