14

Question
Does anyone know of a way to round a float to the nearest 0.05 in JavaScript?

Example

BEFORE | AFTER
  2.51 | 2.55
  2.50 | 2.50
  2.56 | 2.60

Current Code

var _ceil = Math.ceil;
Math.ceil = function(number, decimals){
    if (arguments.length == 1)
    return _ceil(number);

    multiplier = Math.pow(10, decimals);
    return _ceil(number * multiplier) / multiplier;
}

Then elsewhere... return (Math.ceil((amount - 0.05), 1) + 0.05).toFixed(2);

Which is resulting in...

BEFORE | AFTER
  2.51 | 2.55
  2.50 | 2.55
  2.56 | 2.65
35

Multiply by 20, then divide by 20:

(Math.ceil(number*20)/20).toFixed(2)
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  • 1
    Perfect - thanks very much. Are you able to explain why you need to do this? – Sam May 2 '12 at 12:21
  • 4
    although I'd consider this change Math.ceil(number*20 - 0.5)/20).toFixed(2) – Arth May 2 '12 at 12:21
  • 2
    1 = 20 * 0.05; you multiply by 20 so that rounding to the next integer and then dividing back by 20 is equivalent to rounding to the next 0.05 in the original. – Armatus May 2 '12 at 12:23
  • 2
    @Sam Consider the set of floats between two consecutive integers, eg 0 and 1: 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, ..., 9.5. There are twenty elements. So, multiply the current number by 20, take the ceiling, then divide it by 20. jsfiddle.net/Wcjau/1. @ Arth: Correct, I thought that he wanted to round up to the nearest number. – Rob W May 2 '12 at 12:25
  • ahh, that's not really rounding to the nearest 0.05. should have checked the examples! – Arth May 2 '12 at 12:31
12

Rob's answer with my addition:

(Math.ceil(number*20 - 0.5)/20).toFixed(2)

Otherwise it always rounds up to the nearest 0.05.

** UPDATE **

Sorry has been pointed out this is not what the orig poster wanted.

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  • I upvoted your comment, but then I realised that the OP asked to round up (see question's title). – Rob W May 2 '12 at 12:31
  • 2
    This might not be what the OP asked for but it's exactly what I needed. You're missing a parentheses at the beginning of your answer. It should be (Math.ceil(_amount*20 - 0.5)/20).toFixed(2) (I fixed it). – VVV Nov 16 '18 at 15:57
  • Happy to help.. Thanks for the edit! – Arth Nov 16 '18 at 16:07
  • 1
    @usama, I think I actually prefer @marksyzm's answer here for rounding. Basically there are 20 points, 0.05 apart, between two integers.. multiplying the value by 20 coverts the number into a system where each integer represents one of these points. Using an integer rounding method like ceil/round then allows you to round to the next/nearest point. Finally, dividing the result by the 20 converts you back to the original number system with a rounded value – Arth Jan 28 at 9:52
  • 1
    @usama The additional - 0.5 basically converts the ceil method to the round method, which is an unnecessary confusion.. much better to chose the right method! – Arth Jan 28 at 9:56
10

I would go for the standard of actually dividing by the number you're factoring it to, and rounding that and multiplying it back again after. That seems to be a proper working method which you can use with any number and maintain the mental image of what you are trying to achieve.

var val = 26.14,
    factor = 0.05;

val = Math.round(val / factor) * factor;

This will work for tens, hundreds or any number. If you are specifically rounding to the higher number then use Math.ceil instead of Math.round.

Another method specifically for rounding just to 1 or more decimal places (rather than half a place) is the following:

Number(Number(1.5454545).toFixed(1));

It creates a fixed number string and then turns it into a real Number.

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3

I would write a function that does it for you by

  • move the decimal over two places (multiply by 100)
  • then mod (%) that inflatedNumber by 5 and get the remainder
  • subtract the remainder from 5 so that you know what the 'gap'(ceilGap) is between your number and the next closest .05
  • finally, divide your inflatedNumber by 100 so that it goes back to your original float, and voila, your num will be rounded up to the nearest .05.

    function calcNearestPointZeroFive(num){
        var inflatedNumber = num*100,
            remainder     = inflatedNumber % 5;
            ceilGap       = 5 - remainder
    
        return (inflatedNumber + ceilGap)/100
    }
    

If you want to leave numbers like 5.50 untouched you can always add this checker:

if (remainder===0){
    return num
} else {
    var ceilGap  = 5 - remainder
    return (inflatedNumber + ceilGap)/100
}
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1

You need to put -1 to round half down and after that multiply by -1 like the example down bellow.

<script type="text/javascript">

  function roundNumber(number, precision, isDown) {
    var factor = Math.pow(10, precision);
    var tempNumber = number * factor;
    var roundedTempNumber = 0;
    if (isDown) {
      tempNumber = -tempNumber;
      roundedTempNumber = Math.round(tempNumber) * -1;
    } else {
      roundedTempNumber = Math.round(tempNumber);
    }
    return roundedTempNumber / factor;
  }
</script>

<div class="col-sm-12">
  <p>Round number 1.25 down: <script>document.write(roundNumber(1.25, 1, true));</script>
  </p>
  <p>Round number 1.25 up: <script>document.write(roundNumber(1.25, 1, false));</script></p>
</div>

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0

I ended up using this function in my project, successfully:

roundToNearestFiveCents( number: any ) {
    return parseFloat((Math.round(number / 0.05) * 0.05).toFixed(2));
}

Might be of use to someone wanting to simply round to the nearest 5 cents on their monetary results, keeps the result a number, so if you perform addition on it further it won't result in string concatenation; also doesn't unnecessarily round up as a few of the other answers pointed out. Also limits it to two decimals, which is customary with finance.

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0

My solution and test:

let round = function(number, precision = 2, rounding = 0.05) {
  let multiply = 1 / rounding;

  return parseFloat((Math.round(number * multiply) / multiply)).toFixed(precision);
};

https://jsfiddle.net/maciejSzewczyk/7r1tvhdk/40/

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