110

I'm trying to create an iframe from JavaScript and fill it with arbitrary HTML, like so:

var html = '<body>Foo</body>';
var iframe = document.createElement('iframe');
iframe.src = 'data:text/html;charset=utf-8,' + encodeURI(html);

I would expect iframe to then contain a valid window and document. However, this isn't the case:

> console.log(iframe.contentWindow);
null

Try it for yourself: http://jsfiddle.net/TrevorBurnham/9k9Pe/

What am I overlooking?

92

Setting the src of a newly created iframe in javascript does not trigger the HTML parser until the element is inserted into the document. The HTML is then updated and the HTML parser will be invoked and process the attribute as expected.

http://jsfiddle.net/9k9Pe/2/

var iframe = document.createElement('iframe');
var html = '<body>Foo</body>';
iframe.src = 'data:text/html;charset=utf-8,' + encodeURI(html);
document.body.appendChild(iframe);
console.log('iframe.contentWindow =', iframe.contentWindow);

Also this answer your question it's important to note that this approach has compatibility issues with some browsers, please see the answer of @mschr for a cross-browser solution.

  • 3
    quickly checked it in IE9 and it doesn't work – alex Apr 5 '13 at 23:36
  • 3
    Doesn't even work in IE10. @mschr's answer works in IE7+ for sure, maybe even older versions. – James M. Greene Oct 23 '13 at 18:28
  • 2
    His question was "What am I overlooking?" and that was the fact that is iframe wasn't appended to the document. I never claim it was cross browsers and it's only over a year after I answered that someone actually complained. No it's not cross browser. But let's be honest if you want code quality there is probably a much cleaner solution than using a iframe in the first place :) – GillesC Nov 22 '13 at 15:10
194

Allthough your src = encodeURI should work, I would have gone a different way:

var iframe = document.createElement('iframe');
var html = '<body>Foo</body>';
document.body.appendChild(iframe);
iframe.contentWindow.document.open();
iframe.contentWindow.document.write(html);
iframe.contentWindow.document.close();

As this has no x-domain restraints and is completely done via the iframe handle, you may access and manipulate the contents of the frame later on. All you need to make sure of is, that the contents have been rendered, which will (depending on browser type) start during/after the .write command is issued - but not nescessarily done when close() is called.

A 100% compatible way of doing a callback could be this approach:

<html><body onload="parent.myCallbackFunc(this.window)"></body></html>

Iframes has the onload event, however. Here is an approach to access the inner html as DOM (js):

iframe.onload = function() {
   var div=iframe.contentWindow.document.getElementById('mydiv');
};
  • 3
    This is the best answer. – James M. Greene Oct 23 '13 at 18:28
  • 1
    @mschr Does this method support full HTML page code where includes and stylesheets are loaded as well? See stackoverflow.com/questions/19871886 – 1.21 gigawatts Nov 9 '13 at 3:49
  • 2
    Basically, yes i believe it should, ill comment there. The technique basically opens an inputtextstream which you may write to via document.write. In turn, a normal loading webpage retreives this through a websocket-stream. – mschr Nov 12 '13 at 21:56
  • 2
    This works in Internet Explorer! That is handy since data URIs cannot be used as iframe sources in any version of IE. caniuse.com/#feat=datauri – Jesse Hallett Mar 18 '14 at 1:34
  • 1
    Interesting that the document.body.appendChild(iframe) is required for this to work. – Paul May 13 '17 at 16:59
11

Thanks for your great question, this has caught me out a few times. When using dataURI HTML source, I find that I have to define a complete HTML document.

See below a modified example.

var html = '<html><head></head><body>Foo</body></html>';
var iframe = document.createElement('iframe');
iframe.src = 'data:text/html;charset=utf-8,' + encodeURI(html);

take note of the html content wrapped with <html> tags and the iframe.src string.

The iframe element needs to be added to the DOM tree to be parsed.

document.body.appendChild(iframe);

You will not be able to inspect the iframe.contentDocument unless you disable-web-security on your browser. You'll get a message

DOMException: Failed to read the 'contentDocument' property from 'HTMLIFrameElement': Blocked a frame with origin "http://localhost:7357" from accessing a cross-origin frame.

7

There is an alternative for creating an iframe whose contents are a string of HTML: the srcdoc attribute. This is not supported in older browsers (chief among them: Internet Explorer, and possibly Safari?), but there is a polyfill for this behavior, which you could put in conditional comments for IE, or use something like has.js to conditionally lazy load it.

  • 1
    support for this is pretty mainstream now (save IE). And this is definitely preferable to accessing contentDocument directly - especially since if used in conjunction with the sandbox attribute, you can't access contentDocument. – CambridgeMike Nov 6 '14 at 18:27
0

Do this

...
var el = document.getElementById('targetFrame');

var frame_win = getIframeWindow(el);

console.log(frame_win);
...

getIframeWindow is defined here

function getIframeWindow(iframe_object) {
  var doc;

  if (iframe_object.contentWindow) {
    return iframe_object.contentWindow;
  }

  if (iframe_object.window) {
    return iframe_object.window;
  } 

  if (!doc && iframe_object.contentDocument) {
    doc = iframe_object.contentDocument;
  } 

  if (!doc && iframe_object.document) {
    doc = iframe_object.document;
  }

  if (doc && doc.defaultView) {
   return doc.defaultView;
  }

  if (doc && doc.parentWindow) {
    return doc.parentWindow;
  }

  return undefined;
}

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