I want to have an "inside" list with list bullets or decimal numbers being all flush with superior text blocks. Second lines of list entries have to have the same indent like the first row!

E.g.:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. 
Aenean commodo ligula eget dolor. Aenean Aenean massa. 
Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, 
nascetur ridiculus mus. Donec quam felis,

1. Text
2. Text
3. longer Text, longer Text, longer Text, longer Text, longer Text, longer Text
   second line of longer Text
4. Text

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. 
Aenean commodo ligula eget dolor. 

CSS provides only two values for its "list-style-position" - inside and outside. With "inside" second lines are flush with the list points not with the superior line:

3. longer Text, longer Text, longer Text, longer Text, longer Text, longer Text
second line of longer Text
4. Text

Width "outside" my list is not flush with superior text blocks anymore.

Experiments width text-indent, padding-left and margin-left work for unordered lists but they fail for ordered lists because it depends on the list-decimal's number of characters:

 Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. 
 Aenean commodo ligula eget dolor. 

 3. longer Text, longer Text, longer Text, longer Text, longer Text, longer Text
    second line of longer Text
 4. Text
11. Text
12. Text

"11." and "12." aren't flush with the superior text block compared to "3." and "4.".

So where's the secret about ordered lists and the second-line-indent? Thank's for your effort!

  • 1
    User Pali Madra added this as an answer, but it got deleted for containing no further exlpanation. He said the jsfiddle may be what you're looking for: jsfiddle.net/palimadra/CZuXY/1 – bfavaretto Aug 24 '12 at 16:06
  • Try to set padding-left only ... – matzone Oct 21 '13 at 9:45
  • 3
    In case somebody stumbles upon this question, who is just looking for "basic list indention", take a look at this question (stackoverflow.com/questions/17556496/…) and Natasha Banegas answer. – SunnyRed Feb 19 '14 at 16:26
  • Not a single answer addresses the actual question. The actual question is how to left-align the digits in the list, while separately left-aligning the text of the list item with the item text above it when that text overflows to a second or subsequent line. By default -- and in almost every answer -- the list's digits are right-aligned and the text of the list items are left-aligned. – Jessie Westlake Oct 7 at 23:37

14 Answers 14

up vote 222 down vote accepted

Update

This answer is outdated. You can do this a lot more simply, as pointed out I'm surprised to see this hasn't been solved yet. You can make use of the browser's table layout algorithm (without using tables) like this:

ul {
  list-style-position: outside;
}

See https://www.w3schools.com/cssref/pr_list-style-position.asp

Original Answer

ol {
    counter-reset: foo;
    display: table;
}

ol > li {
    counter-increment: foo;
    display: table-row;
}

ol > li::before {
    content: counter(foo) ".";
    display: table-cell; /* aha! */
    text-align: right;
}

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/4rnNK/1/

enter image description here

To make it work in IE8, use the legacy :before notation with one colon.

  • 2
    @Perelli foo is just an arbitrary string (id), it is used to connect the counter-reset, counter-increment and counter() properties. – user123444555621 Aug 8 '13 at 18:04
  • 3
    You can also avoid the wonky table stuff by using position: relative on the <li>and position: absolute on the generated content. See jsfiddle.net/maryisdead/kgr4k for an example. – maryisdead Apr 24 '14 at 8:54
  • 2
    @maryisdead Why 40px? That will break when the counters are wider than that. The whole point of using table layout is that the browser will automatically fit the content. – user123444555621 Apr 24 '14 at 11:36
  • 5
    Nice, but how do you control <li> bottom margin? The height of the <li> is solely determined by the height of the table-cell elements in it. Thus, margin, padding, and height on those elements have no effect. How to work around this limitation? – fiveDust Aug 6 '15 at 9:41
  • 3
    If you have multiple-line list items, and need consistent vertical spacing, the solution is to add vertical border-spacing to the ol selector, e.g. border-spacing: 0 3px; Normal padding on the table-cell does not work because the number is always only one line. – RemBem Nov 12 '15 at 13:42

I believe this will do what you are looking for.

.cssClass li {
    list-style-type: disc;
    list-style-position: inside;
    text-indent: -1em;
    padding-left: 1em;
}

JSFiddle: https://jsfiddle.net/dzbos70f/

enter image description here

  • 21
    better if you also add padding-left: 1em; – Bence Gacsályi Aug 12 '13 at 15:15
  • 16
    This is by far the best answer of all the solutions in this page. It is much more convenient than others. If you're hesitating with which answer to choose, pick this one. – Valentin Mercier Jun 25 '14 at 9:37
  • 21
    @loremmonkey This is quick and dirty but isn't a real solution. First, 1em doesn't equal the space of the indent. The lines won't align perfectly pixel-wise. Second, what about when the list reaches the number 10? 100? The text-indent won't work, it will not be aligned. This answer should be down-voted. – Sunny Mar 13 '15 at 5:41
  • 1
    @Sunny It's a disc list not a numbered one, so why count to 100? I see no problems at all with my lists using the code above. – lorem monkey Mar 13 '15 at 9:13
  • 2
    @loremmonkey The indent isn't 1em. oi60.tinypic.com/a0eyvs.jpg The first list-item is using the text-indent technique above. Compared with how it normally looks with list-style-position: outside it's misaligned, off by a pixel in this case. – Sunny Mar 13 '15 at 14:23

The easiest and cleanest way, without any hacks, is to just to indent the ul (or ol), like so:

ol {
  padding-left: 40px;
  list-style-position: outside;
}

This gives the same result as the accepted answer: https://jsfiddle.net/af2fqryz/

Screenshot:

enter image description here

Check this fiddle:

http://jsfiddle.net/K6bLp/

It shows how to manually indent ul and ol using CSS.

HTML

<head>
    <title>Lines</title>
</head>

<body>
    <ol type="1" style="list-style-position:inside;">
        <li>Text</li>
        <li>Text</li>
        <li >longer Text, longer Text, longer Text, longer Text    second line of longer Text        </li>
    </ol>  
    <br/>
    <ul>
        <li>Text</li>
        <li>Text</li>
        <li>longer Text, longer Text, longer Text, longer Text    second line of longer Text                </li>
    </ul>
</body>

CSS

ol 
{
    margin:0px;
    padding-left:15px;
}

ol li 
{
    margin: 0px;
    padding: 0px;
    text-indent: -1em;
    margin-left: 1em;
}

ul
{
    margin:0;
    padding-left:30px;
}

ul li 
{
    margin: 0px;
    padding: 0px;
    text-indent: 0.5em;
    margin-left: -0.5em;
}

Also I edited your fiddle

http://jsfiddle.net/j7MEd/3/

Make a note of it.

  • thank you, it works great for UL and for OL up to 9 list entries. This is the main problem I described in my question width the 11/12-thing. In my example above I run an other technique so the problem looks different but the core of the problem stays the same: There is a difference if my decimal-list-point has one or two or more numerics - e.g. 1., 11. or 111.! I see no point where I'm able to react via CSS and adjust the text-indent and the margin-left to the number of numerics. – kernfrucht May 3 '12 at 14:48
  • example for my comment above: jsfiddle.net/j7MEd/5 – kernfrucht May 3 '12 at 14:54
  • For the second line indent of ol(more than a digit), I think CSS won't solve it. We should only go for jquery. – Deepan Babu May 4 '12 at 7:34
  • Also note that the type attribute for <ol> appears to be deprecated in HTML 5. Use style="list-style-type: " instead. – AJ. Dec 6 '12 at 14:30
  • 2
    are 21 of you people even serious? this does not work. Not sure if you changed your code since you posted. – JGallardo Mar 2 '17 at 1:05

You can set the margin and padding of either an ol or ul in CSS

ol {
margin-left: 0;
padding-left: 3em;
list-style-position: outside;
}
  • unfortunatly the problem is not solved by this solution: the second lines are flush with the list points not width the superior row, see example above – kernfrucht May 3 '12 at 10:15
  • Can you post your html/css so I can work with that – luke2012 May 3 '12 at 10:19
  • see my code over there: jsfiddle.net/j7MEd – kernfrucht May 3 '12 at 11:57
  • 11 and 12 in jsfiddle.net/j7MEd/1 line up with the top and bottom paragraphs and I didn't change the code. Am I missing something? – luke2012 May 3 '12 at 12:00
  • no, thats not the point. The main problem is that the second (and third, etc...) line of each list point has not the same "indent" like the first line! (see jsfiddle-example). In my question above I think about a workaround with padding, margin etc but it works only for UNordered lists. On ordered list new problems like this 11/12 thing occur. So my main question is: How can I get the indent-thing (like I present in my very first example of my uestion) done for ordered lists without having problems like the 11/12 thing. – kernfrucht May 3 '12 at 12:23

I believe you just need to put the list 'bullet' outside of the padding.

li {
    list-style-position: outside;
    padding-left: 1em;
}

You can use CSS to select a range; in this case, you want list items 1-9:

ol li:nth-child(n+1):nth-child(-n+9) 

Then adjust margins on those first items appropriately:

ol li:nth-child(n+1):nth-child(-n+9) { margin-left: .55em; }
ol li:nth-child(n+1):nth-child(-n+9) em,
ol li:nth-child(n+1):nth-child(-n+9) span { margin-left: 19px; }

See it in action here: http://www.wortfm.org/wort-madison-charts-for-the-week-beginning-11192012/

my solution is quite the same as Pumbaa80's one, but I suggest to use display: table instead of display:table-row for li element. So it will be something like this:

ol {
    counter-reset: foo; /* default display:list-item */
}

ol > li {
    counter-increment: foo;
    display: table; /* instead of table-row */
}

ol > li::before {
    content: counter(foo) ".";
    display: table-cell;
    text-align: right;
}

So now we can use margins for spacing between li's

I'm quite fond of this solution myself:

ul {
    list-style-position: inside;
    list-style-type: disc;
    font-size: 12px;
    line-height: 1.4em;
    padding: 0 1em;
}

ul li {
    margin: 0 0 0 1em;
    padding: 0 0 0 1em;
    text-indent: -2em;
}
  • only problem font size – atilkan Nov 30 '17 at 17:40

The following CSS did the trick:

ul{
    margin-left: 1em;
}

li{
    list-style-position: outside;
    padding-left: 0.5em;
}

The ol, ul lists will work if you want you can also use a table with border: none in the css.

  • i think this is not a good solution concerning semantic rules – kernfrucht Jun 9 '12 at 12:43

CSS provides only two values for its "list-style-position" - inside and outside. With "inside" second lines are flush with the list points not with the superior line:

In ordered lists, without intervention, if you give "list-style-position" the value "inside", the second line of a long list item will have no indent, but will go back to the left edge of the list (i.e. it will left-align with the number of the item). This is peculiar to ordered lists and doesn't happen in unordered lists.

If you instead give "list-style-position" the value "outside", the second line will have the same indent as the first line.

I had a list with a border and had this problem. With "list-style-position" set to "inside", my list didn't look like I wanted it to. But with "list-style-position" set to "outside", the numbers of the list items fell outside the box.

I solved this by simply setting a wider left margin for the whole list, which pushed the whole list toward the right, back into the position it was in before.

CSS:

ol.classname {margin:0;padding:0;}

ol.classname li {margin:0.5em 0 0 0;padding-left:0;list-style-position:outside;}

HTML:

<ol class="classname" style="margin:0 0 0 1.5em;">

Ok, I've gone back and figured some things out. This is a ROUGH SOLUTION to what I was proposing, but it seems to be functional.

First, I made the numbers a series of unordered lists. An unordered list will normally have a disc at the beginning of each list item (

  • ) so you have to set the CSS to list-style: none;

    Then, I made the whole list display: table-row. Here, why don't I just paste you the code instead of gabbing about it?

    <html>
    <head>
    <link type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" href="stylesheet.css"/>
        <title>Result</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div><ul>
            <li>1.</li>
            <li><p>2.</p></li>
            <li>10.</li>
            <li><p>110.</p></li>
            <li>1000.</li>
        </ul>
        </div>
        <div>
            <p>Some author</p>
            <p>Another author</p>
            <p>Author #10</p>
            <p>Author #110</p>
            <p>The one thousandth author today will win a free i-Pod!!!! This line also wraps around so that we can see how hanging indents look.</p>
            </div>
    </body>
    </html>'
    

    CSS:

    ul li{
    list-style: none;
    display: table-row;
    text-align: right;
    

    }

    div {
    float: left;
    display: inline-block;
    margin: 0.2em;
    

    }

    This seems to align the text in the 2nd div with the numbers in the ordered list in the first div. I've surrounded both the list and the text with a tag so that I can just tell all divs to display as inline-blocks. This lined them up nicely.

    The margin is there to put a space between the period and the start of the text. Otherwise, they run right up against one another and it looks like an eyesore.

    My employer wanted wrapped-around text (for longer bibliograhical entries) to line up with the start of the first line, not the left-hand margin. Originally I was fidgeting with a positive margin and a negative text indent, but then I realized that when I switched to two different divs, this had the effect of making it so that the text all lined up because the left-hand margin of the div was the margin where text naturally began. Thus, all I needed was a 0.2em margin to add some space, and everything else lined up swimmingly.

    I hope this helps if OP was having a similar issue...I had a hard time understanding him/her.

    I had this same issue and started using user123444555621's answer. However, I also needed to add padding and a border to each li, which that solution doesn't allow because each li is a table-row.

    First, we use a counter to replicate the ol's numbers.

    We then set display: table; on each li and display: table-cell on the :before to give us the indentation.

    Finally, the tricky part. Since we aren't using a table layout for the whole ol we need to ensure each :before is the same width. We can use the ch unit to roughly keep the width equal to the number of characters. In order to keep the widths uniform when the number of digits for the :before's differ, we can implement quantity queries. Assuming you know your lists won't be 100 items or more, you only need one quantity query rule to tell :before to change its width, but you can easily add more.

    ol {
      counter-reset: ol-num;
      margin: 0;
      padding: 0;
    }
    
    ol li {
      counter-increment: ol-num;
      display: table;
      padding: 0.2em 0.4em;
      border-bottom: solid 1px gray;
    }
    
    ol li:before {
      content: counter(ol-num) ".";
      display: table-cell;
      width: 2ch; /* approximately two characters wide */
      padding-right: 0.4em;
      text-align: right;
    }
    
    /* two digits */
    ol li:nth-last-child(n+10):before,
    ol li:nth-last-child(n+10) ~ li:before {
      width: 3ch;
    }
    
    /* three digits */
    ol li:nth-last-child(n+100):before,
    ol li:nth-last-child(n+100) ~ li:before {
      width: 4ch;
    }
    <ol>
      <li>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Consequuntur facere veniam saepe vel cumque, nobis quisquam! Velit maiores blanditiis cum in mollitia quas facere sint harum, officia laborum, amet vero!</li>
      <li>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Consequuntur facere veniam saepe vel cumque, nobis quisquam! Velit maiores blanditiis cum in mollitia quas facere sint harum, officia laborum, amet vero!</li>
      <li>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Consequuntur facere veniam saepe vel cumque, nobis quisquam! Velit maiores blanditiis cum in mollitia quas facere sint harum, officia laborum, amet vero!</li>
      <li>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Consequuntur facere veniam saepe vel cumque, nobis quisquam! Velit maiores blanditiis cum in mollitia quas facere sint harum, officia laborum, amet vero!</li>
      <li>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Consequuntur facere veniam saepe vel cumque, nobis quisquam! Velit maiores blanditiis cum in mollitia quas facere sint harum, officia laborum, amet vero!</li>
      <li>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Consequuntur facere veniam saepe vel cumque, nobis quisquam! Velit maiores blanditiis cum in mollitia quas facere sint harum, officia laborum, amet vero!</li>
      <li>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Consequuntur facere veniam saepe vel cumque, nobis quisquam! Velit maiores blanditiis cum in mollitia quas facere sint harum, officia laborum, amet vero!</li>
      <li>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Consequuntur facere veniam saepe vel cumque, nobis quisquam! Velit maiores blanditiis cum in mollitia quas facere sint harum, officia laborum, amet vero!</li>
      <li>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Consequuntur facere veniam saepe vel cumque, nobis quisquam! Velit maiores blanditiis cum in mollitia quas facere sint harum, officia laborum, amet vero!</li>
      <li>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Consequuntur facere veniam saepe vel cumque, nobis quisquam! Velit maiores blanditiis cum in mollitia quas facere sint harum, officia laborum, amet vero!</li>
    </ol>

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