10

Given the following:

pthread_t thread;
pthread_create(&thread, NULL, function, NULL);
  • What exactly does pthread_create do to thread?

  • What happens to thread after it has joined the main thread and terminated?

  • What happens if, after thread has joined, you do this:

    pthread_create(&thread, NULL, another_function, NULL);
    
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    I'm being downvoted....why? It's a specific question on programming. – K-RAN May 3 '12 at 15:44
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    +1, it is always nice to know about implementation details. – Matheus Moreira May 3 '12 at 15:50
  • The good thing about open source is that the source is open. You can always download pthread's source code and check it out. – mfontanini May 3 '12 at 16:04
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    @MatheusMoreira, While editing, you are not supposed to change the question itself. If you have more/similar questions, you should post it separately Or post it in the comments. – P.P. May 3 '12 at 16:17
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    The revisions to my question are much more akin to what I'm looking for. Thanks so much guys, and I'm really sorry for the trouble. – K-RAN May 4 '12 at 13:38
5

What exactly does pthread_create do to thread?

thread is an object, it can hold a value to identify a thread. If pthread_create succeeds, it fills in a value that identifies the newly-created thread. If it fails, then the value of thread after the call is undefined. (reference: http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/009695399/functions/pthread_create.html)

What happens to thread after it has joined the main thread and terminated?

Nothing happens to the object, but the value it holds no longer refers to any thread (so for example you can no longer pass it to functions that take a pthread_t, and if you accidentally do then you might get ESRCH errors back).

What happens if, after thread has joined, you do this:

Same as before: if pthread_create succeeds, a value is assigned that identifies the newly-created thread.

  • I think you forgot to mention that pthread_create will actually make the thread and the thread is executed. If you don't have pthread_join, the main thread will not wait for the thread to finish and just proceed. If you have pthread_join, the main thread will wait for the thread to finish there. Isn't it right? – Chan Kim Aug 6 at 15:01
  • That's all true, but I took the question to be about what the function call does to the object thread, not about what it does to the thread of execution identified by the object. – Steve Jessop Aug 14 at 22:43
2

pthread_create will create a thread using OS calls. The wonderful things about abstraction is that you don't really need to care what's happening below. It will set the variable thread equal to an identifier that can be used to reference that thread. For example, if you have multiple threads and want to cancel one of them just call

pthread_cancel(thread)

using the right pthread_t identifier to specify the thread you're interested in.

What happens to thread after it has joined the main thread and terminated?

Before the thread terminates the var thread serves as a key/index to get at or identify a thread. After the thread terminates the value that the key/index pointed to no longer has to be valid. You could keep it around and try to reuse it, but that's almost certain to cause errors.

What happens if, after thread has joined, you do this:

pthread_create(&thread, NULL, another_function, NULL);

No problem, since you give it a reference to thread the value of thread will be set to an identifier for the new thread that was just made. I suspect its possible that it could be the same as before, but I wouldn't count on it.

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    How do you know pthread_join does not modify the object. The object is opaque. You can not (and should not) know what each of these calls does to the pthread_t object that you pass as parameter. All you know is that it is used to identify a thread within the other pthread_* calls. – Martin York May 3 '12 at 16:35
  • @Loki, pthread_join takes its pthread_t argument by value; it cannot affect its value. It can certainly modify the "object" that the pthread_t value identifies, but that's a separate issue, and one that Paul's answer never even mentioned. It's the way way free doesn't modify the pointer it gets passed. – Rob Kennedy May 3 '12 at 16:49
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    @RobKennedy: You are making assumptions. What if pthread_t was a pointer. Then you can easily modify the object. But we are missing the point. The point is you do not know (and should not know) what the functions do to the object. The object is opaque for a reason. – Martin York May 3 '12 at 17:38
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    even if pthread_t was a pointer that pointer will not be modified, it's copied into the call. The thing it points to may be modified, but that's where the opaqueness comes in. You have a valid point and I edited the response to try to not get into the discussed problem. – Paul Rubel May 3 '12 at 18:35

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