696

How do you generate all the permutations of a list in Python, independently of the type of elements in that list?

For example:

permutations([])
[]

permutations([1])
[1]

permutations([1, 2])
[1, 2]
[2, 1]

permutations([1, 2, 3])
[1, 2, 3]
[1, 3, 2]
[2, 1, 3]
[2, 3, 1]
[3, 1, 2]
[3, 2, 1]
3
  • 7
    I agree with the recursive, accepted answer - TODAY. However, this still hangs out there as a huge computer science problem. The accepted answer solves this problem with exponential complexity (2^N N=len(list)) Solve it (or prove you can't) in polynomial time :) See "traveling salesman problem" – FlipMcF Mar 26 '09 at 16:06
  • 51
    @FlipMcF It will be difficult to "solve it" in polynomial time, given it takes factorial time to even just enumerate the output... so, no, it's not possible. – Thomas Apr 3 '13 at 2:54
  • @FlipMcF: no it's not really: a) only to find the optimal solution, not good-enough solutions, which are good enough for real-world purposes and b) we don't need to expand all nodes in the search-space i.e. all permutations; that's what heuristic algorithms like A* – smci Jan 16 at 0:51

36 Answers 36

610

There's a function in the standard-library for this: itertools.permutations.

import itertools
list(itertools.permutations([1, 2, 3]))

If for some reason you want to implement it yourself or are just curious to know how it works, here's one nice approach, taken from http://code.activestate.com/recipes/252178/:

def all_perms(elements):
    if len(elements) <=1:
        yield elements
    else:
        for perm in all_perms(elements[1:]):
            for i in range(len(elements)):
                # nb elements[0:1] works in both string and list contexts
                yield perm[:i] + elements[0:1] + perm[i:]

A couple of alternative approaches are listed in the documentation of itertools.permutations. Here's one:

def permutations(iterable, r=None):
    # permutations('ABCD', 2) --> AB AC AD BA BC BD CA CB CD DA DB DC
    # permutations(range(3)) --> 012 021 102 120 201 210
    pool = tuple(iterable)
    n = len(pool)
    r = n if r is None else r
    if r > n:
        return
    indices = range(n)
    cycles = range(n, n-r, -1)
    yield tuple(pool[i] for i in indices[:r])
    while n:
        for i in reversed(range(r)):
            cycles[i] -= 1
            if cycles[i] == 0:
                indices[i:] = indices[i+1:] + indices[i:i+1]
                cycles[i] = n - i
            else:
                j = cycles[i]
                indices[i], indices[-j] = indices[-j], indices[i]
                yield tuple(pool[i] for i in indices[:r])
                break
        else:
            return

And another, based on itertools.product:

def permutations(iterable, r=None):
    pool = tuple(iterable)
    n = len(pool)
    r = n if r is None else r
    for indices in product(range(n), repeat=r):
        if len(set(indices)) == r:
            yield tuple(pool[i] for i in indices)
13
  • 21
    This and other recursive solutions have a potential hazard of eating up all the RAM if the permutated list is big enough – Boris Gorelik May 27 '09 at 7:05
  • 4
    They also reach the recursion limit (and die) with large lists – dbr Jun 9 '09 at 3:12
  • 63
    bgbg, dbr: Its using a generator, so the function itself won't eat up memory. Its left to you on how to consume the iterator returned by all_perms (say you could write each iteration to disk and not worry about memory). I know this post is old but I'm writing this for the benefit of everyone who reads it now. Also now, the best way would be to use itertools.permutations() as pointed out by many. – Jagtesh Chadha May 2 '11 at 12:40
  • 19
    Not just a generator. It's using nested generators, which each yield to the previous one up the call stack, in case that's not clear. It uses O(n) memory, which is good. – cdunn2001 Jul 19 '11 at 19:02
  • 1
    PS: I fixed it, with for i in range(len(elements)) instead of for i in range(len(elements)+1). In fact, the singled-out element elements[0:1] can be in len(elements) different positions, in the result, not len(elements)+1. – Eric O Lebigot May 29 '12 at 13:48
349

And in Python 2.6 onwards:

import itertools
itertools.permutations([1,2,3])

(returned as a generator. Use list(permutations(l)) to return as a list.)

1
  • 19
    Notice that there exists an r parameter, e.g. itertools.permutations([1,2,3], r=2), which will generate all possible permutations selecting 2 elements: [(1, 2), (1, 3), (2, 1), (2, 3), (3, 1), (3, 2)] – toto_tico Aug 24 '17 at 8:49
296

The following code with Python 2.6 and above ONLY

First, import itertools:

import itertools

Permutation (order matters):

print list(itertools.permutations([1,2,3,4], 2))
[(1, 2), (1, 3), (1, 4),
(2, 1), (2, 3), (2, 4),
(3, 1), (3, 2), (3, 4),
(4, 1), (4, 2), (4, 3)]

Combination (order does NOT matter):

print list(itertools.combinations('123', 2))
[('1', '2'), ('1', '3'), ('2', '3')]

Cartesian product (with several iterables):

print list(itertools.product([1,2,3], [4,5,6]))
[(1, 4), (1, 5), (1, 6),
(2, 4), (2, 5), (2, 6),
(3, 4), (3, 5), (3, 6)]

Cartesian product (with one iterable and itself):

print list(itertools.product([1,2], repeat=3))
[(1, 1, 1), (1, 1, 2), (1, 2, 1), (1, 2, 2),
(2, 1, 1), (2, 1, 2), (2, 2, 1), (2, 2, 2)]
3
  • 3
  • ` print list(itertools.permutations([1,2,3,4], 2)) ^` SyntaxError: invalid syntax` Just starting out using VS Code What did I do wrong? The pointer is pointing under the "t" of "list" – gus Jun 8 '20 at 8:37
  • @gus parenthesis are missing for print: print(list(itertools.permutations([1,2,3,4], 2))) I guess it is because of different versions of Python. – giammi56 Oct 15 '20 at 14:49
50
def permutations(head, tail=''):
    if len(head) == 0:
        print(tail)
    else:
        for i in range(len(head)):
            permutations(head[:i] + head[i+1:], tail + head[i])

called as:

permutations('abc')
2
  • 2
    Why print tail and then return None? Why not return tail instead? Why not return anything anyways? – bugmenot123 Nov 27 '17 at 11:48
  • @bugmenot123 you probably want all of the final tails rather than just tail, this is done easily by adding a perms=[] parameter to the function, appending to it on every print and having a final return perms – Alex Moore-Niemi Jan 3 at 3:48
35
#!/usr/bin/env python

def perm(a, k=0):
   if k == len(a):
      print a
   else:
      for i in xrange(k, len(a)):
         a[k], a[i] = a[i] ,a[k]
         perm(a, k+1)
         a[k], a[i] = a[i], a[k]

perm([1,2,3])

Output:

[1, 2, 3]
[1, 3, 2]
[2, 1, 3]
[2, 3, 1]
[3, 2, 1]
[3, 1, 2]

As I'm swapping the content of the list it's required a mutable sequence type as input. E.g. perm(list("ball")) will work and perm("ball") won't because you can't change a string.

This Python implementation is inspired by the algorithm presented in the book Computer Algorithms by Horowitz, Sahni and Rajasekeran.

4
  • I assume k is the length or permutations. For k = 2 outputs [1, 2, 3]. Shouldn't it be (1, 2) (1, 3) (2, 1) (2, 3) (3, 1) (3, 2) ?? – Konstantinos Monachopoulos Feb 24 '19 at 22:13
  • k is the index of the element you want to swap – sf8193 May 9 '20 at 20:24
  • NameError: name 'xrange' is not defined – Pathros Apr 4 at 20:21
  • 7 years later, how would I return a list of lists of all the permuted lists? Also, can this be done iteratively? – mLstudent33 Apr 24 at 0:46
23

This solution implements a generator, to avoid holding all the permutations on memory:

def permutations (orig_list):
    if not isinstance(orig_list, list):
        orig_list = list(orig_list)

    yield orig_list

    if len(orig_list) == 1:
        return

    for n in sorted(orig_list):
        new_list = orig_list[:]
        pos = new_list.index(n)
        del(new_list[pos])
        new_list.insert(0, n)
        for resto in permutations(new_list[1:]):
            if new_list[:1] + resto <> orig_list:
                yield new_list[:1] + resto
18

In a functional style

def addperm(x,l):
    return [ l[0:i] + [x] + l[i:]  for i in range(len(l)+1) ]

def perm(l):
    if len(l) == 0:
        return [[]]
    return [x for y in perm(l[1:]) for x in addperm(l[0],y) ]

print perm([ i for i in range(3)])

The result:

[[0, 1, 2], [1, 0, 2], [1, 2, 0], [0, 2, 1], [2, 0, 1], [2, 1, 0]]
0
16

The following code is an in-place permutation of a given list, implemented as a generator. Since it only returns references to the list, the list should not be modified outside the generator. The solution is non-recursive, so uses low memory. Work well also with multiple copies of elements in the input list.

def permute_in_place(a):
    a.sort()
    yield list(a)

    if len(a) <= 1:
        return

    first = 0
    last = len(a)
    while 1:
        i = last - 1

        while 1:
            i = i - 1
            if a[i] < a[i+1]:
                j = last - 1
                while not (a[i] < a[j]):
                    j = j - 1
                a[i], a[j] = a[j], a[i] # swap the values
                r = a[i+1:last]
                r.reverse()
                a[i+1:last] = r
                yield list(a)
                break
            if i == first:
                a.reverse()
                return

if __name__ == '__main__':
    for n in range(5):
        for a in permute_in_place(range(1, n+1)):
            print a
        print

    for a in permute_in_place([0, 0, 1, 1, 1]):
        print a
    print
0
15

A quite obvious way in my opinion might be also:

def permutList(l):
    if not l:
            return [[]]
    res = []
    for e in l:
            temp = l[:]
            temp.remove(e)
            res.extend([[e] + r for r in permutList(temp)])

    return res
11
list2Perm = [1, 2.0, 'three']
listPerm = [[a, b, c]
            for a in list2Perm
            for b in list2Perm
            for c in list2Perm
            if ( a != b and b != c and a != c )
            ]
print listPerm

Output:

[
    [1, 2.0, 'three'], 
    [1, 'three', 2.0], 
    [2.0, 1, 'three'], 
    [2.0, 'three', 1], 
    ['three', 1, 2.0], 
    ['three', 2.0, 1]
]
2
  • 3
    While it technically produces the desired output, you're solving something that could be O(n lg n) in O(n^n) - "slightly" inefficient for large sets. – James Aug 22 '11 at 3:23
  • 4
    @James: I am a little confused by the O(n log n) that you give: the number of permutations is n!, which is already much larger than O(n log n); so, I can't see how a solution could be O(n log n). However, it is true that this solution is in O(n^n), which is much larger than n!, as is clear from Stirling's approximation. – Eric O Lebigot May 29 '12 at 13:38
9

I used an algorithm based on the factorial number system- For a list of length n, you can assemble each permutation item by item, selecting from the items left at each stage. You have n choices for the first item, n-1 for the second, and only one for the last, so you can use the digits of a number in the factorial number system as the indices. This way the numbers 0 through n!-1 correspond to all possible permutations in lexicographic order.

from math import factorial
def permutations(l):
    permutations=[]
    length=len(l)
    for x in xrange(factorial(length)):
        available=list(l)
        newPermutation=[]
        for radix in xrange(length, 0, -1):
            placeValue=factorial(radix-1)
            index=x/placeValue
            newPermutation.append(available.pop(index))
            x-=index*placeValue
        permutations.append(newPermutation)
    return permutations

permutations(range(3))

output:

[[0, 1, 2], [0, 2, 1], [1, 0, 2], [1, 2, 0], [2, 0, 1], [2, 1, 0]]

This method is non-recursive, but it is slightly slower on my computer and xrange raises an error when n! is too large to be converted to a C long integer (n=13 for me). It was enough when I needed it, but it's no itertools.permutations by a long shot.

3
  • 4
    Hi, welcome to Stack Overflow. Although posting the brute force method has its merits, if you don't think your solution is better than the accepted solution, you probably shouldn't post it (especially on an old question that already has so many answers). – Hannele Aug 8 '13 at 20:43
  • 3
    I was actually looking for a brute-force non-library approach, so thanks! – Jay Taylor Jul 1 '16 at 19:16
  • I found it useful too! – user3347814 Oct 11 '20 at 1:42
9

Regular implementation (no yield - will do everything in memory):

def getPermutations(array):
    if len(array) == 1:
        return [array]
    permutations = []
    for i in range(len(array)): 
        # get all perm's of subarray w/o current item
        perms = getPermutations(array[:i] + array[i+1:])  
        for p in perms:
            permutations.append([array[i], *p])
    return permutations

Yield implementation:

def getPermutations(array):
    if len(array) == 1:
        yield array
    else:
        for i in range(len(array)):
            perms = getPermutations(array[:i] + array[i+1:])
            for p in perms:
                yield [array[i], *p]

The basic idea is to go over all the elements in the array for the 1st position, and then in 2nd position go over all the rest of the elements without the chosen element for the 1st, etc. You can do this with recursion, where the stop criteria is getting to an array of 1 element - in which case you return that array.

enter image description here

7
  • This does not work for me _> ValueError: operands could not be broadcast together with shapes (0,) (2,) , for this line: perms = getPermutations(array[:i] + array[i+1:]) – RK1 Feb 6 '20 at 15:29
  • @RK1 what was the input? – Maverick Meerkat Feb 6 '20 at 21:19
  • I'm passing in a numpy array _> getPermutations(np.array([1, 2, 3])), I see it works for a list, just got confused as the func arg is array :) – RK1 Feb 7 '20 at 8:24
  • @RK1 glad it works :-) list is a keyword in python, so it's usually not a good idea to call your parameter a keyword, as it will "shadow" it. So I use the word array, as this is the actual functionality of the list that I'm using - their array like manner. I guess if I would write documentation I would clarify it. Also I believe that basic "interview" questions should be solved without external packages, like numpy. – Maverick Meerkat Feb 7 '20 at 9:02
  • Haha that's true, yeah was trying to use it with numba and got greedy with speed so tried to use it exclusively with numpy arrays – RK1 Feb 7 '20 at 9:21
8

Note that this algorithm has an n factorial time complexity, where n is the length of the input list

Print the results on the run:

global result
result = [] 

def permutation(li):
if li == [] or li == None:
    return

if len(li) == 1:
    result.append(li[0])
    print result
    result.pop()
    return

for i in range(0,len(li)):
    result.append(li[i])
    permutation(li[:i] + li[i+1:])
    result.pop()    

Example:

permutation([1,2,3])

Output:

[1, 2, 3]
[1, 3, 2]
[2, 1, 3]
[2, 3, 1]
[3, 1, 2]
[3, 2, 1]
8

One can indeed iterate over the first element of each permutation, as in tzwenn's answer. It is however more efficient to write this solution this way:

def all_perms(elements):
    if len(elements) <= 1:
        yield elements  # Only permutation possible = no permutation
    else:
        # Iteration over the first element in the result permutation:
        for (index, first_elmt) in enumerate(elements):
            other_elmts = elements[:index]+elements[index+1:]
            for permutation in all_perms(other_elmts): 
                yield [first_elmt] + permutation

This solution is about 30 % faster, apparently thanks to the recursion ending at len(elements) <= 1 instead of 0. It is also much more memory-efficient, as it uses a generator function (through yield), like in Riccardo Reyes's solution.

6

This is inspired by the Haskell implementation using list comprehension:

def permutation(list):
    if len(list) == 0:
        return [[]]
    else:
        return [[x] + ys for x in list for ys in permutation(delete(list, x))]

def delete(list, item):
    lc = list[:]
    lc.remove(item)
    return lc
6

For performance, a numpy solution inspired by Knuth, (p22) :

from numpy import empty, uint8
from math import factorial

def perms(n):
    f = 1
    p = empty((2*n-1, factorial(n)), uint8)
    for i in range(n):
        p[i, :f] = i
        p[i+1:2*i+1, :f] = p[:i, :f]  # constitution de blocs
        for j in range(i):
            p[:i+1, f*(j+1):f*(j+2)] = p[j+1:j+i+2, :f]  # copie de blocs
        f = f*(i+1)
    return p[:n, :]

Copying large blocs of memory saves time - it's 20x faster than list(itertools.permutations(range(n)) :

In [1]: %timeit -n10 list(permutations(range(10)))
10 loops, best of 3: 815 ms per loop

In [2]: %timeit -n100 perms(10) 
100 loops, best of 3: 40 ms per loop
5

Disclaimer: shapeless plug by package author. :)

The trotter package is different from most implementations in that it generates pseudo lists that don't actually contain permutations but rather describe mappings between permutations and respective positions in an ordering, making it possible to work with very large 'lists' of permutations, as shown in this demo which performs pretty instantaneous operations and look-ups in a pseudo-list 'containing' all the permutations of the letters in the alphabet, without using more memory or processing than a typical web page.

In any case, to generate a list of permutations, we can do the following.

import trotter

my_permutations = trotter.Permutations(3, [1, 2, 3])

print(my_permutations)

for p in my_permutations:
    print(p)

Output:

A pseudo-list containing 6 3-permutations of [1, 2, 3].
[1, 2, 3]
[1, 3, 2]
[3, 1, 2]
[3, 2, 1]
[2, 3, 1]
[2, 1, 3]
4

ANOTHER APPROACH (without libs)

def permutation(input):
    if len(input) == 1:
        return input if isinstance(input, list) else [input]

    result = []
    for i in range(len(input)):
        first = input[i]
        rest = input[:i] + input[i + 1:]
        rest_permutation = permutation(rest)
        for p in rest_permutation:
            result.append(first + p)
    return result

Input can be a string or a list

print(permutation('abcd'))
print(permutation(['a', 'b', 'c', 'd']))
2
  • This does not work for a list with integers, eg. [1, 2, 3] returns [6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6] – RK1 Feb 6 '20 at 15:50
  • @RK1, u can try this print(permutation(['1','2','3'])) – Tatsu Feb 7 '20 at 5:42
3
from __future__ import print_function

def perm(n):
    p = []
    for i in range(0,n+1):
        p.append(i)
    while True:
        for i in range(1,n+1):
            print(p[i], end=' ')
        print("")
        i = n - 1
        found = 0
        while (not found and i>0):
            if p[i]<p[i+1]:
                found = 1
            else:
                i = i - 1
        k = n
        while p[i]>p[k]:
            k = k - 1
        aux = p[i]
        p[i] = p[k]
        p[k] = aux
        for j in range(1,(n-i)/2+1):
            aux = p[i+j]
            p[i+j] = p[n-j+1]
            p[n-j+1] = aux
        if not found:
            break

perm(5)
3

Here is an algorithm that works on a list without creating new intermediate lists similar to Ber's solution at https://stackoverflow.com/a/108651/184528.

def permute(xs, low=0):
    if low + 1 >= len(xs):
        yield xs
    else:
        for p in permute(xs, low + 1):
            yield p        
        for i in range(low + 1, len(xs)):        
            xs[low], xs[i] = xs[i], xs[low]
            for p in permute(xs, low + 1):
                yield p        
            xs[low], xs[i] = xs[i], xs[low]

for p in permute([1, 2, 3, 4]):
    print p

You can try the code out for yourself here: http://repl.it/J9v

3

The beauty of recursion:

>>> import copy
>>> def perm(prefix,rest):
...      for e in rest:
...              new_rest=copy.copy(rest)
...              new_prefix=copy.copy(prefix)
...              new_prefix.append(e)
...              new_rest.remove(e)
...              if len(new_rest) == 0:
...                      print new_prefix + new_rest
...                      continue
...              perm(new_prefix,new_rest)
... 
>>> perm([],['a','b','c','d'])
['a', 'b', 'c', 'd']
['a', 'b', 'd', 'c']
['a', 'c', 'b', 'd']
['a', 'c', 'd', 'b']
['a', 'd', 'b', 'c']
['a', 'd', 'c', 'b']
['b', 'a', 'c', 'd']
['b', 'a', 'd', 'c']
['b', 'c', 'a', 'd']
['b', 'c', 'd', 'a']
['b', 'd', 'a', 'c']
['b', 'd', 'c', 'a']
['c', 'a', 'b', 'd']
['c', 'a', 'd', 'b']
['c', 'b', 'a', 'd']
['c', 'b', 'd', 'a']
['c', 'd', 'a', 'b']
['c', 'd', 'b', 'a']
['d', 'a', 'b', 'c']
['d', 'a', 'c', 'b']
['d', 'b', 'a', 'c']
['d', 'b', 'c', 'a']
['d', 'c', 'a', 'b']
['d', 'c', 'b', 'a']
3

This algorithm is the most effective one, it avoids of array passing and manipulation in recursive calls, works in Python 2, 3:

def permute(items):
    length = len(items)
    def inner(ix=[]):
        do_yield = len(ix) == length - 1
        for i in range(0, length):
            if i in ix: #avoid duplicates
                continue
            if do_yield:
                yield tuple([items[y] for y in ix + [i]])
            else:
                for p in inner(ix + [i]):
                    yield p
    return inner()

Usage:

for p in permute((1,2,3)):
    print(p)

(1, 2, 3)
(1, 3, 2)
(2, 1, 3)
(2, 3, 1)
(3, 1, 2)
(3, 2, 1)
3
def pzip(c, seq):
    result = []
    for item in seq:
        for i in range(len(item)+1):
            result.append(item[i:]+c+item[:i])
    return result


def perm(line):
    seq = [c for c in line]
    if len(seq) <=1 :
        return seq
    else:
        return pzip(seq[0], perm(seq[1:]))
2

Generate all possible permutations

I'm using python3.4:

def calcperm(arr, size):
    result = set([()])
    for dummy_idx in range(size):
        temp = set()
        for dummy_lst in result:
            for dummy_outcome in arr:
                if dummy_outcome not in dummy_lst:
                    new_seq = list(dummy_lst)
                    new_seq.append(dummy_outcome)
                    temp.add(tuple(new_seq))
        result = temp
    return result

Test Cases:

lst = [1, 2, 3, 4]
#lst = ["yellow", "magenta", "white", "blue"]
seq = 2
final = calcperm(lst, seq)
print(len(final))
print(final)
2

To save you folks possible hours of searching and experimenting, here's the non-recursive permutaions solution in Python which also works with Numba (as of v. 0.41):

@numba.njit()
def permutations(A, k):
    r = [[i for i in range(0)]]
    for i in range(k):
        r = [[a] + b for a in A for b in r if (a in b)==False]
    return r
permutations([1,2,3],3)
[[1, 2, 3], [1, 3, 2], [2, 1, 3], [2, 3, 1], [3, 1, 2], [3, 2, 1]]

To give an impression about performance:

%timeit permutations(np.arange(5),5)

243 µs ± 11.1 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)
time: 406 ms

%timeit list(itertools.permutations(np.arange(5),5))
15.9 µs ± 8.61 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100000 loops each)
time: 12.9 s

So use this version only if you have to call it from njitted function, otherwise prefer itertools implementation.

1

I see a lot of iteration going on inside these recursive functions, not exactly pure recursion...

so for those of you who cannot abide by even a single loop, here's a gross, totally unnecessary fully recursive solution

def all_insert(x, e, i=0):
    return [x[0:i]+[e]+x[i:]] + all_insert(x,e,i+1) if i<len(x)+1 else []

def for_each(X, e):
    return all_insert(X[0], e) + for_each(X[1:],e) if X else []

def permute(x):
    return [x] if len(x) < 2 else for_each( permute(x[1:]) , x[0])


perms = permute([1,2,3])
1

Another solution:

def permutation(flag, k =1 ):
    N = len(flag)
    for i in xrange(0, N):
        if flag[i] != 0:
            continue
        flag[i] = k 
        if k == N:
            print flag
        permutation(flag, k+1)
        flag[i] = 0

permutation([0, 0, 0])
2
1

Anyway we could use sympy library , also support for multiset permutations

import sympy
from sympy.utilities.iterables import multiset_permutations
t = [1,2,3]
p = list(multiset_permutations(t))
print(p)

# [[1, 2, 3], [1, 3, 2], [2, 1, 3], [2, 3, 1], [3, 1, 2], [3, 2, 1]]

Answer is highly inspired by Get all permutations of a numpy array

1

This is the asymptotically optimal way O(n*n!) of generating permutations after initial sorting.

There are n! permutations at most and hasNextPermutation(..) runs in O(n) time complexity

In 3 steps,

  1. Find largest j such that a[j] can be increased
  2. Increase a[j] by smallest feasible amount
  3. Find lexicogrpahically least way to extend the new a[0..j]
'''
Lexicographic permutation generation

consider example array state of [1,5,6,4,3,2] for sorted [1,2,3,4,5,6]
after 56432(treat as number) ->nothing larger than 6432(using 6,4,3,2) beginning with 5
so 6 is next larger and 2345(least using numbers other than 6)
so [1, 6,2,3,4,5]
'''
def hasNextPermutation(array, len):
    ' Base Condition '
    if(len ==1):
        return False
    '''
    Set j = last-2 and find first j such that a[j] < a[j+1]
    If no such j(j==-1) then we have visited all permutations
    after this step a[j+1]>=..>=a[len-1] and a[j]<a[j+1]

    a[j]=5 or j=1, 6>5>4>3>2
    '''
    j = len -2
    while (j >= 0 and array[j] >= array[j + 1]):
        j= j-1
    if(j==-1):
        return False
    # print(f"After step 2 for j {j}  {array}")
    '''
    decrease l (from n-1 to j) repeatedly until a[j]<a[l]
    Then swap a[j], a[l]
    a[l] is the smallest element > a[j] that can follow a[l]...a[j-1] in permutation
    before swap we have a[j+1]>=..>=a[l-1]>=a[l]>a[j]>=a[l+1]>=..>=a[len-1]
    after swap -> a[j+1]>=..>=a[l-1]>=a[j]>a[l]>=a[l+1]>=..>=a[len-1]

    a[l]=6 or l=2, j=1 just before swap [1, 5, 6, 4, 3, 2] 
    after swap [1, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2] a[l]=5, a[j]=6
    '''
    l = len -1
    while(array[j] >= array[l]):
        l = l-1
    # print(f"After step 3 for l={l}, j={j} before swap {array}")
    array[j], array[l] = array[l], array[j]
    # print(f"After step 3 for l={l} j={j} after swap {array}")
    '''
    Reverse a[j+1...len-1](both inclusive)

    after reversing [1, 6, 2, 3, 4, 5]
    '''
    array[j+1:len] = reversed(array[j+1:len])
    # print(f"After step 4 reversing {array}")
    return True

array = [1,2,4,4,5]
array.sort()
len = len(array)
count =1
print(array)
'''
The algorithm visits every permutation in lexicographic order
generating one by one
'''
while(hasNextPermutation(array, len)):
    print(array)
    count = count +1
# The number of permutations will be n! if no duplicates are present, else less than that
# [1,4,3,3,2] -> 5!/2!=60
print(f"Number of permutations: {count}")


1
  • Welcome to Stack Overflow. Code dumps without any explanation are rarely helpful. Stack Overflow is about learning, not providing snippets to blindly copy and paste. Please edit your question and explain how it answers the specific question being asked. See How to Answer. This is especially important when answering old questions (this one is over 12 old) with existing answers (this one has 40). How does this answer improve upon what's already here? Note also that the question is about Python. How does an answer in Java help? – Chris Apr 16 at 14:08
0

My Python Solution:

def permutes(input,offset):
    if( len(input) == offset ):
        return [''.join(input)]

    result=[]        
    for i in range( offset, len(input) ):
         input[offset], input[i] = input[i], input[offset]
         result = result + permutes(input,offset+1)
         input[offset], input[i] = input[i], input[offset]
    return result

# input is a "string"
# return value is a list of strings
def permutations(input):
    return permutes( list(input), 0 )

# Main Program
print( permutations("wxyz") )

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