I have inherited a particular class hierarchy of singletons whose declarations are summarized below (there are more implementations -- I'm just showing the minimal set to demonstrate the problem). It smells to high heaven to me, foremost because singletons are being inherited from, as well as the way instance in the base class has its value overwritten in the static initializers of the subclasses.

If all the implementations were in the foo.common parent package I would consider just dropping the instance member and getInstance() methods from them, making the classes and their constructors package-local, and having some public factory class in foo.common create a single instance of each, hold onto that single instance of each internally (partitioned by whether it was an implementation of IReadOnly or IReadWrite) and provide a couple of public lookup methods where based on some enum it would return the asked-for implementation as the interface type.

But implementations can be outside of foo.common and foo.common isn't allowed to depend on such "more specific" packages, since foo.common is intended for stuff common to a bunch of apps. So something that simple can't be done. What then?

First interface:

package foo.common.config;
public interface IReadOnly
{
    void load();
    String getVal(String key);
}

Second interface:

package foo.common.config;
public interface IReadWrite extends IReadOnly
{
    void save();
    void setVal(String key, String value);
}

First implementation:

package foo.common.config;
public class ReadOnlyImpl implements IReadOnly
{
    protected static IReadOnly instance;

    static {
        instance = new ReadOnlyImpl();
    }

    public static IReadOnly getInstance() {
        return instance;
    }

    protected ReadOnlyImpl() {}

    // implement methods in IReadOnly
}

Second implementation

package foo.common.config;
public class ReadWriteImpl extends ReadOnlyImpl implements IReadWrite
{
    static {
        instance = new ReadWriteImpl();
    }

    public static IReadWrite getInstance() {
        return (IReadWrite) instance;
    }

    protected ReadWriteImpl() {
        super();
    }

    // Implement methods in IReadWrite
}

Third implementation:

// While things in this package can depend
// on things in foo.common, nothing in 
// foo.common is allowed to depend on this package.
package foo.apps.someapp;
public class MoreSpecificReadWriteImpl extends ReadWriteImpl
{
    static {
        instance = new MoreSpecificReadWriteImpl();
    }

    public static IReadWrite getInstance() {
        return (IReadWrite) instance;
    }

    protected MoreSpecificReadWrite() {
        super();
    }

    // Override superclass methods to do something specific
}
  • Could you explain why/how you would like to refactor it? I really don't see anything wrong with it. – user845279 May 4 '12 at 5:20
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Putting package foo.apps.someapp aside, the design of the package foo.common.config is wrong.

IReadOnly o1=ReadOnlyImpl.getInstance(); // ok, returns ReadOnlyImpl
...
ReadWrite o2=ReadWriteImpl.getInstance(); // ok, returns ReadWriteImpl 
...
IReadOnly o3=ReadOnlyImpl.getInstance(); // bad, returns ReadWriteImpl, the same as o2.

The reason is that all classes use the same static variable ReadOnlyImpl.instance. I would use separate variable in all classes, including MoreSpecificReadWriteImpl. If this would not fit, then think of using Spring container or similar framework.

  • Is there a typo your last line? It is same as first line. – user845279 May 4 '12 at 5:15
  • No typo. It is not the same: o1 and o3. – Alexei Kaigorodov May 4 '12 at 7:12

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