2

The following code works just fine. But it seems so verbose, surely there is a more elegant way to calculate this?

The idea is that I have a list of 100 incrementing timestamps, I want to look at those timestamps and calculate the mean time between each time-stamp.

The code below functions, but I'm sure it's really inefficient to be reversing lists like this.

Any suggestions?

#!/usr/bin/python 

nums = [1,4,6,10]
print nums
nums_orig = list(nums)

nums_orig.pop()
nums.reverse()
nums.pop()
nums.reverse()

print nums
print nums_orig

total = 0

for idx, val in enumerate(nums):
  difference = val - nums_orig[idx]
  total += difference
  print idx, val - nums_orig[idx]

print "Mean difference is %d" % (total / len(nums))
  • 2
    Observation: the answer in your example is 3, which is suspiciously identical to (last - first) / (count - 1). – AakashM May 4 '12 at 13:05
6

What you are looking for is

>>> nums = [1,4,6,10]
>>> [x-y for x,y in zip(nums[1:],nums)]
[3, 2, 4]
>>> delta=[x-y for x,y in zip(nums[1:],nums)]
>>> float(sum(delta))/len(delta)
3.0

Solution with using Starmap

>>> from itertools import starmap
>>> from operator import sub
>>> sum(starmap(sub,zip(nums[1:],nums)))/float(len(nums)-1)
3.0
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Minor naming criticism: you've called your list of delta values mean, seems needlessly confusing. – MattH May 4 '12 at 11:51
  • 1
    You are using truncating integer division instead of floating point division. mean is not an apt variable name for a list; try something like deltas – John Machin May 4 '12 at 11:51
  • @JohnMachin: Makes sense. Implemented the suggestion. – Abhijit May 4 '12 at 11:53
8

If you have numpy:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> np.diff([1,4,6,10]).mean()
3.0
| improve this answer | |
  • Sorry dude, super elegant but the second answer gave me more insight. – Bryan Hunt May 4 '12 at 12:00
3

The idea is that I have a list of 100 incrementing timestamps, I want to look at those timestamps and calculate the mean time between each time-stamp.

Since they are increasing, the sum of the differences is simply the difference between the first and last. The number of differences, meanwhile, is simply 1 less than the number of values.

So no looping is needed. Just:

(nums[-1] - nums[0])/(len(nums) - 1)
| improve this answer | |
  • +1 Well spotted. But it actually doesn't matter that they are increasing, they can do anything, and you are still correct - its effectively a conservative field! – fraxel May 4 '12 at 13:56
  • Assuming you're talking about signed differences rather than the absolute difference, yes. – Karl Knechtel May 4 '12 at 14:08

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