19
votes

One of the pitfalls I run into on a daily basis is customers saying one thing while meaning another. Usually, this is just due to a miscommunication somewhere, but occasionally they are, in fact, saying the same thing I am just using a different term.

For example, one of my customers the other day mentioned a feature he called, "find as you type." Being a little confused, I asked him what he meant, and he described the feature in Google where, once you start typing a search query, Google suggests other, popular queries that match the letters you have typed.

Click! He meant AutoComplete! He was not wrong, it is just that I had never heard that term before.

In the spirit of reducing confusion, what terms can you think of that are different but mean, essentially, the same thing?

Also, what terms do people think mean the same thing, but don't. Please differentiate between the two.

Please only one set of terms per answer, so we can vote on the best ones.

closed as too broad by Bhargav Rao Apr 2 '17 at 19:59

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  • Intellisense is another one for AutoComplete ;) – Jeremy Smyth Jun 25 '09 at 17:14
  • The feature you're referring to with Google is actually their Google Suggest feature that's been refined for several years now. It's not like the typical autocomplete functionality, because rather than querying a list of recently used terms you have entered before on your own computer, it queries against the Google database for popular terms that may be related to what you're typing. All made possible by the collective technologies we know as AJAX. – Steve Wortham Jun 25 '09 at 17:20
  • Right. He meant the auto-completion feature, not the querying mode, which is why I jumped to AutoComplete rather than Google Suggest. – Matthew Jones Jun 25 '09 at 17:22
  • Ah, the way you wrote it made me think you were referring to Google Suggest. Never mind then. – Steve Wortham Jun 25 '09 at 17:24
  • 1
    @Barry Brown you are correct. I want terms that actually are synonymous. If you want to submit commonly-confused terms, that's fine, just mark it as such. – Matthew Jones Jun 25 '09 at 17:26

54 Answers 54

41
votes

parameter == argument

Parameter is the variable in the declaration of function or method.

Argument is the actual value of this variable that gets passed to function.

I like this one because it happens even to programmers

40
votes

I've seen this a few times on this site:

Authentication != Authorization

Authentication: Your identity
Authorization: Your privileges

  • Very good!....... – User Jun 26 '09 at 14:27
  • 3
    +1 for another common misconception. – Matthew Jones Jun 26 '09 at 14:28
  • 5
    Authentication is "are you who you say you are?". Authorization is "given who you are, what are you allowed to do?". – Adam Rosenfield Jun 27 '09 at 1:26
  • This is seriously a misconception to some people? – Janie Jul 22 '09 at 22:35
  • 1
    The HTTP spec screwed this up originally. HTTP 401 says, "unauthorized" but should really be "unauthenticated". stackoverflow.com/a/6937030/155892 – Mark Sowul Jan 11 '17 at 14:28
16
votes

Users often confuse "web browser" with "the Internet." I'll hear them say "I'm going to the Internet," which means "I'm launching a web browser."

  • 15
    "my internet is broken" – Chris Simpson Jun 25 '09 at 17:32
  • 6
    youtube.com/watch?v=o4MwTvtyrUQ – Jim Puls Jun 25 '09 at 17:42
  • 1
    LOL 3.5 out of 50 got it right :D – MiseryIndex Jun 25 '09 at 17:54
  • 3
    That video goes to show me that users just want to get work done and don't care what the various components are called. It's pointless to try to distinguish between IE and Firefox, Google and Yahoo, and search engines and browsers; to them it's just "the Internet." – Barry Brown Jun 25 '09 at 18:59
  • 1
    My mother often calls me and tells me she "deleted the Internet" and doesn't know what to do. I finally got her to save the Internet onto a floppy in case this happens again. – bta May 3 '10 at 22:29
15
votes

"CPU" = tower

A favorite term I have heard customers use.

  • 12
    butbutbut that's the "hard drive" – Jeremy Smyth Jun 25 '09 at 18:48
  • That's the CPU?! That's gotta be one big motherboard! – CiscoIPPhone Jun 27 '09 at 0:37
  • Where I work, there is an employe that refer to the tower as the "hard disk". It confused me once or twice before I get it. – Mathieu Pagé Jun 30 '09 at 19:37
  • 2
    Although I understand the difference, I'm guilty of using this colloquialism :( – Dinah Jul 31 '09 at 21:07
13
votes

AJAX and Javascript.
A lot of times I hear semi-technical people interchanging the two terms. Like: "Can't you animate that image using AJAX". Which is of course just plain javascript.

  • 6
    ♫ Use AJAX... the foaming cleanser! ♪ – Michael Myers Jun 26 '09 at 14:16
  • I was once told by a Sr Software Engineer that she was using ajax to sort a table. Before you think she was right, she was only using JS lol. This is the same one that asked me what a .sql file was and how to open it. – Allen Rice Jun 26 '09 at 14:56
  • JavaScript is just AJAX, without the AX. – Brad Gilbert Jun 27 '09 at 4:56
  • Definitely +1 for the quavers. – Alistair Knock Jul 31 '09 at 20:55
12
votes

"Client" is the big, perennial classic term that means so many things, all within the context of almost every development project.

  • 1
    "Client" isn't being used as a synonym, though. It just has many different definitions. – Barry Brown Jun 25 '09 at 17:51
  • 6
    client gets even more fun when using X – cobbal Jun 25 '09 at 18:36
  • oh the amount of times I've gotten into the XClient debate :P – Jeremy Smyth Jun 25 '09 at 18:48
  • One thing is always for sure though.....clients are always getting S - E - R - V - E - D, OHHHHHH SNAPPPPP!!!! – Janie Jul 22 '09 at 22:37
12
votes

Hard drive space != RAM

  • I agree; the trouble is, the distinction is never worth making because the user who is mentioning either thing is actually talking about something entirely unrelated anyway, oftentimes the orientation of the USB connector. – Alistair Knock Jul 31 '09 at 20:56
  • Blame this on whoever decided to call them both memory! This rears its ugly head even more when people talk about their digital camera (or whatever) having x amount of memory. The term memory is or course accurate but people think that the word "memory" only refers to one thing. This short term vs long term stuff is understandably confusing to layfolk. – Dinah Jul 31 '09 at 21:10
10
votes

Verification == Validation

From wikipedia:

It is sometimes said that validation can be expressed by the query "Are you building the right thing?" and verification by "Are you building the thing right?". "Building the right thing" refers back to the user's needs, while "building it right" checks that the specifications be correctly implemented by the system. In some contexts, it is required to have written requirements for both as well as formal procedures or protocols for determining compliance.

  • @skaffman good one! Hear this all the time. +1. – Matthew Jones Jun 25 '09 at 19:49
9
votes

"open source" == "free software"

If you watch Revolution OS, you'll hear Richard Stallman use the term "free software" and others like Linus Torvalds and Bruce Perens use "open source." After watching the film, I think they're talking about the same thing, but disagreeing (vehemently in some cases) on what to call it.

(I hope none of them are reading this.)

  • The software itself is free, what is not is the documentation, support, manuals, etc, etc... – victor hugo Jun 25 '09 at 17:47
  • 1
    And neither term should be confused for "license-free". – i_am_jorf Jun 25 '09 at 18:39
  • 2
    They are talking about the same thing in the practical sense, but very different things in the philosophical sense. Free Software is a social movement. Open Source software is somewhere between a development technique and a way to talk about Free Software without sounding like Stallman, inclusive. The difference in the Free Software Foundation's definition of Free Software and the Open Source Initiative's definition of Open Source Software is almost trivial, though. – David Thornley Jun 25 '09 at 19:48
9
votes

"Inconceivable"

I do not think it means what you think it means.

  • 1
    I think it means what I think it does. – User Jun 27 '09 at 20:45
  • My name is Diego Montoya, you killed my Father - prepare to die! – belugabob Jun 30 '09 at 15:09
  • 2
    @belugabob: it's "Inigo Montoya" (see imdb.com/character/ch0003786) - awesome quote though. – system PAUSE Jun 30 '09 at 16:00
  • I knew it was wrong, as I was typing it, but went with the flow of the moment. :-) – belugabob Jun 30 '09 at 20:43
  • Inconceivable \In'conceiv"able\, adjective [Pref. in- not + conceivable: cf. F. inconcevable.] Not conceivable; incapable of being conceived by the mind; not explicable by the human intellect, or by any known principles or agencies; incomprehensible; as, it is inconceivable to us how the will acts in producing muscular motion. – Tester101 Jul 31 '09 at 20:41
8
votes

I once heard a junior dev use NULL and VOID interchangeably.

Scariest thing I'd ever heard.

  • void? Whazzat? – Beska Jun 25 '09 at 20:16
  • wow i've actually never heard someone confuse the 2 – Allen Rice Jun 26 '09 at 15:08
  • 1
    Void is the absence of a variable, Null is a variable with undefined/zero value. – Brad Gilbert Jun 27 '09 at 4:58
  • 4
    Danger, Brad Gilbert! [re: zero] – Alistair Knock Jul 31 '09 at 20:58
7
votes

Drop down = Combo box

  • Or Picklist in the MSCRM world. – Matt Jun 25 '09 at 17:26
  • so how its different? one is on the web and on on the desktop? – IAdapter Jul 1 '09 at 7:45
  • 1
    Drop down list = what you you get when you use the select tag in HTML. Combo box = a combination of a drop-down list or list box and a single-line textbox where the user can either type a value directly into the control or choose from the list of existing options (e.g. the font selector in the Formatting toolbar in Word or Excel.) – mikej Jul 17 '09 at 15:24
7
votes

Wiki != Wikipedia. (As in, "Well I looked it up on Wiki, and it says...")

This one is not really programming related, but it could cause a problem for someone working at a company that had their own internal wiki.

Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiki

Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:About

Some wikis that are not Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_wikis

  • 1
    Yes, I hear that one all the time and it bugs me. – David Johnstone Jun 27 '09 at 1:11
  • I find it hilarious that your list of wikis that aren't Wikipedia is a Wikipedia page. =) – chazomaticus Jul 31 '09 at 21:04
  • I understand the difference but I admit that I'm guilty of this one as well. My spouse and I often say we'll "look it up in Wiki." – Dinah Jul 31 '09 at 21:11
  • @chazomaticus, I hope that didn't confuse people. It's just that if I need a list of something, I usually go to Wikipedia to find it. =) – MatrixFrog Aug 1 '09 at 3:07
7
votes

Java == Javascript

5
votes

Winchester == hard disk drive.

It ain't!

alt text http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/11/Winchester_Model_1873_Short_Rifle_1495.jpg/300px-Winchester_Model_1873_Short_Rifle_1495.jpg

  • 12
    Winchester refers to the first hard drive with a sealed head/disk assembly released by IBM in 1973. It was named after the Winchester 30-30 rifle due to its original capacity of two 30MB platters. All modern disk drives use this technology or a derivative of it. That's why some people refer to them as 'Winchesters'. – Phaedrus Jun 27 '09 at 0:42
  • The only times I hear people call them winchesters is as a joke. I do it myself when I encounter a particularly pedantic individual, just to wind them up. I also call them "spindles", which works even better. – skaffman Jun 27 '09 at 16:29
  • Winchester is the most common way to refer to a hard drive in Russian. Also called Vint (a screw/bolt, but also a short version of Vinchester, a Russian pronunciation of Winchester). – gooli Jun 28 '09 at 20:26
4
votes

Scope != Lifetime

Scope :: is the collection of statements where a variable can be referenced. Those statements are called the referencing environment of that variable.

Lifetime :: is the association between a variable(the name) and its place of storage in memory(address).

4
votes

Closure == lambda. In reality, they are distinct things: lambda is any anonymous function, and may or may not close over some variables; closure is any function that closes over some variables, and may or may not be anonymous. For example, the original Pascal had no lambdas, but it had closures (in form of nested functions).

4
votes

deprecate != depreciate

Seriously people. Features are not depreciated from upcoming releases of software. They are deprecated.

3
votes

hard disk drive = computer

  • 1
    I get that all the time. People call that black thing under their desk the "hard disk" instead of the computer. – Barry Brown Jun 25 '09 at 17:17
3
votes

There are 180 pages of preferred terms in the "Microsoft Manual of Style for Technical Publications," which is a great book for technical writers, but I think programmers should have it too.

Many of the entries mention unacceptable (or outdated) equivalents.

Example: "system tray Do not use. Use notification area instead."

3
votes

PowerPoint != the projector

It really bothers me when people say "I'll just put it up on the PowerPoint" and then they go to Microsoft Word or something instead.

3
votes

Bug - Incident - Failure - Error - Defect - Problem - Issue

  • which all = by design – Robert Fraser Aug 6 '09 at 3:28
  • 1
    Good one. Some of these terms are also confusingly used to describe the "ticket"/"incident" where the bug, issue etc is recorded. E.g. Jira overloads the term "issue". Bugs/defects and issues can mean different things, e.g. a bug is something that is not working properly with the software whereas an issue is something that has been raised as a concern, e.g. it may cause problems now or later down the line (e.g. a problem with the design or architecture). – Steve Chambers Jun 8 '15 at 15:23
3
votes

Some users will use the term "downloading" to generally mean "transferring" instead of distinguishing between "downloading" and "uploading." So, if they say "The error happened right after I downloaded the data," it might refer to another part of the process than what a tech person would take it to mean.

3
votes

System == Library == Framework == Program == Application == Software

3
votes

One that really turned my head around was someone in my QA department referring to a null value and a blank value as being one and the same. I smiled and asked if they were serious and they said, "of course they're the same." I tried to explain as simply as I could that they were not the same and it just didn't register with them.

/matt

3
votes

PC != Windows

PC means personal computer. Apple invented the PC. But, now it's taken a life of its own as anything that has Windows on it.

In this same vein, people tend to compare "Mac" or "PC" when it should be "OS X" or "Windows"... or "Mac vs. ThinkPad/Satellite"

Of course, that would be more difficult to put into an ad.

  • 1
    While there have been many "Personal Computers" over the years, IBM started the term with their "PC" models, that ran Microsoft DOS. Many other companies made "PC-Compatible" machines, and eventually the term became the generic for an MS-DOS box. While Windows has replaced DOS in the same space, the term carried over. "Wintel" is perhaps a more descriptive term for the platform, but this is a case where the common usage rather than accuracy makes the definition. – mbmcavoy May 3 '10 at 22:48
  • True, but it's really only got steam as "anything that's not a Mac" in recent years, in part due to the Apple ads. I always remembered them being called: "IBM compatible" not "PC Compatible". Compaq was the first one to create a clone. – Armstrongest May 4 '10 at 5:59
2
votes

computer == system == workstation == machine == box

  • 2
    So this is a computer? geocities.com/pubot5/cardboardbox.jpg – Ólafur Waage Jun 25 '09 at 20:16
  • 1
    "...terms that mean the same thing or don't..." – Eli Jun 25 '09 at 21:51
  • @Ólafur: One of the guys I work with has asked me on more than one occasion, "What box are you using?" and every time it takes me a moment to overcome my initial confusion. Because the image you linked to is exactly what appears in my head. – Dan Tao Jun 26 '09 at 12:03
  • @Eli is your joke bone broken? – Ólafur Waage Jun 26 '09 at 12:53
  • @Eli: "Please differentiate between the two." – Ponkadoodle May 3 '10 at 22:09
2
votes

Whenever dealing with Departments of Education you must learn that "system" means software and "technology" means hardware.

  • 2
    All I can say is ... WTF? – Brad Gilbert Jun 27 '09 at 5:03
  • It's a "system"! "A group of interacting, interrelated, or interdependent elements forming a complex whole."[1] that include both software and hardware in the case of a computer. 1:answers.com/topic/system – Ponkadoodle May 3 '10 at 22:12
2
votes

Host == Server

.. Which is untrue :)

  • Why is this not true? If something is hosting something, it's 'serving' it, therefore it's a server. – Daniel Sorichetti Jul 28 '10 at 0:52
  • Yeah, your logic makes sense, which is why so many people (including myself) have had it wrong for so long time. In network terminology, a host can be a client, a server, a bridge-adapter etc... A host is simply a node in the topology, while a server is the node that accepts incoming connections. – cwap Jul 28 '10 at 10:33
  • aren't these two different types of "host"? the topology one and the server one (should it be existing). – n611x007 Oct 23 '12 at 7:02
2
votes

Value Object == Value Type

Value Objects are classes representing immutable attributes, as in Domain Driven Design.

Value Types are variables whose values are held on the stack (int, bool, struct, etc). These are spoken of in relation to Reference Types, which live on the heap and have memory pointers.

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