129

I have two action methods that are conflicting. Basically, I want to be able to get to the same view using two different routes, either by an item's ID or by the item's name and its parent's (items can have the same name across different parents). A search term can be used to filter the list.

For example...

Items/{action}/ParentName/ItemName
Items/{action}/1234-4321-1234-4321

Here are my action methods (there are also Remove action methods)...

// Method #1
public ActionResult Assign(string parentName, string itemName) { 
    // Logic to retrieve item's ID here...
    string itemId = ...;
    return RedirectToAction("Assign", "Items", new { itemId });
}

// Method #2
public ActionResult Assign(string itemId, string searchTerm, int? page) { ... }

And here are the routes...

routes.MapRoute("AssignRemove",
                "Items/{action}/{itemId}",
                new { controller = "Items" }
                );

routes.MapRoute("AssignRemovePretty",
                "Items/{action}/{parentName}/{itemName}",
                new { controller = "Items" }
                );

I understand why the error is occurring, since the page parameter can be null, but I can't figure out the best way to resolve it. Is my design poor to begin with? I've thought about extending Method #1's signature to include the search parameters and moving the logic in Method #2 out to a private method they would both call, but I don't believe that will actually resolve the ambiguity.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.


Actual Solution (based on Levi's answer)

I added the following class...

public class RequireRouteValuesAttribute : ActionMethodSelectorAttribute {
    public RequireRouteValuesAttribute(string[] valueNames) {
        ValueNames = valueNames;
    }

    public override bool IsValidForRequest(ControllerContext controllerContext, MethodInfo methodInfo) {
        bool contains = false;
        foreach (var value in ValueNames) {
            contains = controllerContext.RequestContext.RouteData.Values.ContainsKey(value);
            if (!contains) break;
        }
        return contains;
    }

    public string[] ValueNames { get; private set; }
}

And then decorated the action methods...

[RequireRouteValues(new[] { "parentName", "itemName" })]
public ActionResult Assign(string parentName, string itemName) { ... }

[RequireRouteValues(new[] { "itemId" })]
public ActionResult Assign(string itemId) { ... }
  • 3
    Thanks for posting up the actual implementation. It sure helps people with similar problems. As I had today. :-P – Paulo Santos Feb 12 '11 at 9:16
  • 4
    Amazing! Minor change suggestion: (imo really useful) 1) params string[] valueNames to make the attribute declaration more concise and (preference) 2) replace the IsValidForRequest method body with return ValueNames.All(v => controllerContext.RequestContext.RouteData.Values.ContainsKey(v)); – Benjamin Podszun Mar 1 '12 at 8:58
  • 2
    I had the same querystring parameter issue. If you need those parameters considered for the requirement, swap out the contains = ... section for something like this: contains = controllerContext.RequestContext.RouteData.Values.ContainsKey(value) || controllerContext.RequestContext.HttpContext.Request.Params.AllKeys.Contains(value); – patridge May 2 '12 at 20:45
  • 3
    Note of warning on that: the required parameters must be sent in exactly as named. If your action method parameter is a complex type populated by passing in its properties by name (and letting MVC massage them into the complex type), this system fails because the name is not in the querystring keys. For example, this will not work: ActionResult DoSomething(Person p), where Person has various simple properties like Name, and requests to it are made with property names directly (e.g., /dosomething/?name=joe+someone&other=properties). – patridge May 3 '12 at 19:05
  • 4
    If you are using MVC4 onwards, you should use controllerContext.HttpContext.Request[value] != null instead of controllerContext.RequestContext.RouteData.Values.ContainsKey(value); but a nice piece of work nonetheless. – Kevin Farrugia Feb 7 '15 at 16:26
175

MVC doesn't support method overloading based solely on signature, so this will fail:

public ActionResult MyMethod(int someInt) { /* ... */ }
public ActionResult MyMethod(string someString) { /* ... */ }

However, it does support method overloading based on attribute:

[RequireRequestValue("someInt")]
public ActionResult MyMethod(int someInt) { /* ... */ }

[RequireRequestValue("someString")]
public ActionResult MyMethod(string someString) { /* ... */ }

public class RequireRequestValueAttribute : ActionMethodSelectorAttribute {
    public RequireRequestValueAttribute(string valueName) {
        ValueName = valueName;
    }
    public override bool IsValidForRequest(ControllerContext controllerContext, MethodInfo methodInfo) {
        return (controllerContext.HttpContext.Request[ValueName] != null);
    }
    public string ValueName { get; private set; }
}

In the above example, the attribute simply says "this method matches if the key xxx was present in the request." You can also filter by information contained within the route (controllerContext.RequestContext) if that better suits your purposes.

  • This ended up being just what I needed. As you suggested, I needed to use controllerContext.RequestContext. – Jonathan Freeland Jun 25 '09 at 20:05
  • 4
    Nice! I hadn't seen the RequireRequestValue attribute yet. That's a good one to know. – CoderDennis Jun 25 '09 at 21:24
  • 1
    we can use valueprovider to get values from several sources like : controllerContext.Controller.ValueProvider.GetValue(value); – Jone Polvora Jul 22 '13 at 7:37
  • 1
  • 1
    I got my previous edit rejected so I'm just gonna comment: [AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.All, AllowMultiple=true)] – Mzn May 2 '15 at 7:02
7

The parameters in your routes {roleId}, {applicationName} and {roleName} don't match the parameter names in your action methods. I don't know if that matters, but it makes it tougher to figure out what your intention is.

Do your itemId's conform to a pattern that could be matched via regex? If so, then you can add a restraint to your route so that only url's that match the pattern are identified as containing an itemId.

If your itemId only contained digits, then this would work:

routes.MapRoute("AssignRemove",
                "Items/{action}/{itemId}",
                new { controller = "Items" },
                new { itemId = "\d+" }
                );

Edit: You could also add a constraint to the AssignRemovePretty route so that both {parentName} and {itemName} are required.

Edit 2: Also, since your first action is just redirecting to your 2nd action, you could remove some ambiguity by renaming the first one.

// Method #1
public ActionResult AssignRemovePretty(string parentName, string itemName) { 
    // Logic to retrieve item's ID here...
    string itemId = ...;
    return RedirectToAction("Assign", itemId);
}

// Method #2
public ActionResult Assign(string itemId, string searchTerm, int? page) { ... }

Then specify the Action names in your routes to force the proper method to be called:

routes.MapRoute("AssignRemove",
                "Items/Assign/{itemId}",
                new { controller = "Items", action = "Assign" },
                new { itemId = "\d+" }
                );

routes.MapRoute("AssignRemovePretty",
                "Items/Assign/{parentName}/{itemName}",
                new { controller = "Items", action = "AssignRemovePretty" },
                new { parentName = "\w+", itemName = "\w+" }
                );
  • 1
    Sorry Dennis, the parameters do actually match. I've fixed the question. I will try out the regex restraint and get back to you. Thanks! – Jonathan Freeland Jun 25 '09 at 18:12
  • Your second edit helped me out, but ultimately it was Levi's suggestion that sealed the deal. Thanks again! – Jonathan Freeland Jun 25 '09 at 20:56
6

Another approach is to rename one of the methods so there is no conflict. For example

// GET: /Movies/Delete/5
public ActionResult Delete(int id = 0)

// POST: /Movies/Delete/5
[HttpPost, ActionName("Delete")]
public ActionResult DeleteConfirmed(int id = 0)

See http://www.asp.net/mvc/tutorials/getting-started-with-mvc3-part9-cs

3

Recently I took the chance to improve @Levi's answer to support a wider range of scenarios I had to deal with, such as: multiple parameter support, match any of them (instead of them all) and even match none of them.

Here's the attribute I'm using now:

/// <summary>
/// Flags an Action Method valid for any incoming request only if all, any or none of the given HTTP parameter(s) are set,
/// enabling the use of multiple Action Methods with the same name (and different signatures) within the same MVC Controller.
/// </summary>
public class RequireParameterAttribute : ActionMethodSelectorAttribute
{
    public RequireParameterAttribute(string parameterName) : this(new[] { parameterName })
    {
    }

    public RequireParameterAttribute(params string[] parameterNames)
    {
        IncludeGET = true;
        IncludePOST = true;
        IncludeCookies = false;
        Mode = MatchMode.All;
    }

    public override bool IsValidForRequest(ControllerContext controllerContext, MethodInfo methodInfo)
    {
        switch (Mode)
        {
            case MatchMode.All:
            default:
                return (
                    (IncludeGET && ParameterNames.All(p => controllerContext.HttpContext.Request.QueryString.AllKeys.Contains(p)))
                    || (IncludePOST && ParameterNames.All(p => controllerContext.HttpContext.Request.Form.AllKeys.Contains(p)))
                    || (IncludeCookies && ParameterNames.All(p => controllerContext.HttpContext.Request.Cookies.AllKeys.Contains(p)))
                    );
            case MatchMode.Any:
                return (
                    (IncludeGET && ParameterNames.Any(p => controllerContext.HttpContext.Request.QueryString.AllKeys.Contains(p)))
                    || (IncludePOST && ParameterNames.Any(p => controllerContext.HttpContext.Request.Form.AllKeys.Contains(p)))
                    || (IncludeCookies && ParameterNames.Any(p => controllerContext.HttpContext.Request.Cookies.AllKeys.Contains(p)))
                    );
            case MatchMode.None:
                return (
                    (!IncludeGET || !ParameterNames.Any(p => controllerContext.HttpContext.Request.QueryString.AllKeys.Contains(p)))
                    && (!IncludePOST || !ParameterNames.Any(p => controllerContext.HttpContext.Request.Form.AllKeys.Contains(p)))
                    && (!IncludeCookies || !ParameterNames.Any(p => controllerContext.HttpContext.Request.Cookies.AllKeys.Contains(p)))
                    );
        }
    }

    public string[] ParameterNames { get; private set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Set it to TRUE to include GET (QueryStirng) parameters, FALSE to exclude them:
    /// default is TRUE.
    /// </summary>
    public bool IncludeGET { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Set it to TRUE to include POST (Form) parameters, FALSE to exclude them:
    /// default is TRUE.
    /// </summary>
    public bool IncludePOST { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Set it to TRUE to include parameters from Cookies, FALSE to exclude them:
    /// default is FALSE.
    /// </summary>
    public bool IncludeCookies { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Use MatchMode.All to invalidate the method unless all the given parameters are set (default).
    /// Use MatchMode.Any to invalidate the method unless any of the given parameters is set.
    /// Use MatchMode.None to invalidate the method unless none of the given parameters is set.
    /// </summary>
    public MatchMode Mode { get; set; }

    public enum MatchMode : int
    {
        All,
        Any,
        None
    }
}

For further info and how-to implementation samples check out this blog post that I wrote on this topic.

  • Thanks, great improvement! But ParameterNames is not set in ctor – nvirth Jul 20 '18 at 10:08
0
routes.MapRoute("AssignRemove",
                "Items/{parentName}/{itemName}",
                new { controller = "Items", action = "Assign" }
                );

consider using MVC Contribs test routes library to test your routes

"Items/parentName/itemName".Route().ShouldMapTo<Items>(x => x.Assign("parentName", itemName));

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