107
dataGridView1.Rows[x1].Cells[y1].Style.BackColor = System.Drawing.Color.Red;
System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000);

İ want to wait one second before printing my grid cells with this code, but it isn't working. What can i do?

  • 1
    What code is supposed to be run after the 1 second wait? – Allensb May 5 '12 at 1:54
  • 1
    How do you know it's not working? Try sleep 10000 and see if it's working. 1000 is very short to evaluate if it is working. – Missy Aug 31 '16 at 17:17
  • This works fine: System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000); – Andrew Apr 6 '19 at 17:38

10 Answers 10

178

Is it pausing, but you don't see your red color appear in the cell? Try this:

dataGridView1.Rows[x1].Cells[y1].Style.BackColor = System.Drawing.Color.Red;
dataGridView1.Refresh();
System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000);
| improve this answer | |
28

Personally I think Thread.Sleep is a poor implementation. It locks the UI etc. I personally like timer implementations since it waits then fires.

Usage: DelayFactory.DelayAction(500, new Action(() => { this.RunAction(); }));

//Note Forms.Timer and Timer() have similar implementations. 

public static void DelayAction(int millisecond, Action action)
{
    var timer = new DispatcherTimer();
    timer.Tick += delegate

    {
        action.Invoke();
        timer.Stop();
    };

    timer.Interval = TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(millisecond);
    timer.Start();
}
| improve this answer | |
16

Wait function using timers, no UI locks.

public void wait(int milliseconds)
{
    var timer1 = new System.Windows.Forms.Timer();
    if (milliseconds == 0 || milliseconds < 0) return;

    // Console.WriteLine("start wait timer");
    timer1.Interval = milliseconds;
    timer1.Enabled  = true;
    timer1.Start();

    timer1.Tick += (s, e) =>
    {
        timer1.Enabled = false;
        timer1.Stop();
        // Console.WriteLine("stop wait timer");
    };

    while (timer1.Enabled)
    {
        Application.DoEvents();
    }
}

Usage: just placing this inside your code that needs to wait:

wait(1000); //wait one second
| improve this answer | |
  • Just a suggestion. If you multiply the min with 60000, the parameter name will be more meaningful. timer1.Interval = min * 60000; – Golda Nov 16 '18 at 6:28
  • Yes, you are right it should be milliseconds instead of min. I will update the name. Thanks – Said Nov 26 '18 at 13:40
3

I feel like all that was wrong here was the order, Selçuklu wanted the app to wait for a second before filling in the grid, so the Sleep command should have come before the fill command.

    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000);
    dataGridView1.Rows[x1].Cells[y1].Style.BackColor = System.Drawing.Color.Red;
| improve this answer | |
2

Busy waiting won't be a severe drawback if it is short. In my case there was the need to give visual feedback to the user by flashing a control (it is a chart control that can be copied to clipboard, which changes its background for some milliseconds). It works fine this way:

using System.Threading;
...
Clipboard.SetImage(bm);   // some code
distribution_chart.BackColor = Color.Gray;
Application.DoEvents();   // ensure repaint, may be not needed
Thread.Sleep(50);
distribution_chart.BackColor = Color.OldLace;
....
| improve this answer | |
2

.Net Core seems to be missing the DispatcherTimer.

If we are OK with using an async method, Task.Delay will meet our needs. This can also be useful if you want to wait inside of a for loop for rate-limiting reasons.

public async Task DoTasks(List<Items> items)
{
    foreach (var item in items)
    {
        await Task.Delay(2 * 1000);
        DoWork(item);
    }
}

You can await the completion of this method as follows:

public async void TaskCaller(List<Item> items)
{
    await DoTasks(items);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Thats just the perfect way. Thanks ! :) – Deniz Jul 17 at 21:02
1

use dataGridView1.Refresh(); :)

| improve this answer | |
0

Try this function

public void Wait(int time) 
{           
    Thread thread = new Thread(delegate()
    {   
        System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(time);
    });
    thread.Start();
    while (thread.IsAlive)
    Application.DoEvents();
}

Call function

Wait(1000); // Wait for 1000ms = 1s
| improve this answer | |
0

The Best way to wait without freezing your main thread is using the Task.Delay function.

So your code will look like this

var t = Task.Run(async delegate
{              
    dataGridView1.Rows[x1].Cells[y1].Style.BackColor = System.Drawing.Color.Red;
    dataGridView1.Refresh();
    await Task.Delay(1000);             
});
| improve this answer | |
-4

Maybe try this code:

void wait (double x) {
    DateTime t = DateTime.Now;
    DateTime tf = DateTime.Now.AddSeconds(x);

    while (t < tf) {
        t = DateTime.Now;
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    This is a valid solution. However, you should add a description of its benefits and harms, such as mentioning that because it is a busy-waiting solution, it will take up CPU time. – user2509848 Nov 13 '14 at 21:12
  • 1
    The shorter solution is the better solution – BASEER ULHASSAN Jan 23 '17 at 13:02

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