402

How do you call a function from within another function in a module.exports declaration?

app.js
var bla = require('./bla.js');
console.log(bla.bar());
bla.js
module.exports = {

  foo: function (req, res, next) {
    return ('foo');
  },

  bar: function(req, res, next) {
    this.foo();
  }

}

I'm trying to access the function foo from within the function bar, and I'm getting:

TypeError: Object # has no method 'foo'

If I change this.foo() to just foo() I get:

ReferenceError: foo is not defined

2
  • 6
    I tested your code and have no errors. The bar function returns undefined because have no return statement. Are you sure you are testing correctly?
    – Ferchi
    Commented Oct 2, 2014 at 19:25
  • 1
    Tested in node version v8.12.0 and does no longer throw the error. bar has no return statement so running console.log(bla.bar()) simply returns undefined
    – VladNeacsu
    Commented Apr 15, 2019 at 19:00

10 Answers 10

506

Change this.foo() to module.exports.foo()

9
  • 3
    @NamNguyen Calling exports.foo() seems a little bit awkward and hard to read. Commented Jul 19, 2014 at 12:20
  • 5
    I think that this is better than the accepted answer. If you define functions outside of the exports scope, it adds an extra level of indirection, and while it can be desirable sometimes, it makes it more complicated, to refactor, e.g. rename the function, of find usage of the function, etc. Commented Sep 21, 2015 at 14:48
  • 8
    module.exports.foo() and exports.foo() do not work for me with Node.js v5.8.0. Commented Jul 15, 2016 at 15:35
  • 16
    exports.foo() is not working but module.exports.foo() is working with NodeJS v6.9.1 Commented Nov 22, 2016 at 14:04
  • 1
    exports.foo only works if you define an exports varible that references the module.exports object const exports = module.exports = {} and then set functions foo and bar as its methods exports.foo = function() {} and exports.bar = function (){ exports.foo() } here to reference foo in the bar use exports.foo. If you want to reference foo from bar inside module.exports object then use module.exports.foo inside bar.
    – pouya
    Commented Jul 19, 2017 at 12:24
205

You could declare your functions outside of the module.exports block.

var foo = function (req, res, next) {
  return ('foo');
}

var bar = function (req, res, next) {
  return foo();
}

Then:

module.exports = {
  foo: foo,
  bar: bar
}
4
  • 12
    what if I wanted to access properties of the object from the method? Commented Jul 11, 2016 at 15:12
  • 1
    I'm getting TypeError: yourClass.youMethod is not a function when I did this. I'm using node version 6.9.1. Do you have to have a return statement? I do not have return statements since all my code is async in the functions. Commented Dec 12, 2016 at 22:12
  • 1
    Nice comparison of different styles -- gist.github.com/kimmobrunfeldt/10848413
    – Tadas V.
    Commented Sep 10, 2017 at 17:59
  • 4
    Or, more concisely using ES6, module.exports = { foo, bar, } Commented Dec 15, 2019 at 9:21
133

You can also do this to make it more concise and readable. This is what I've seen done in several of the well written open sourced modules:

var self = module.exports = {

  foo: function (req, res, next) {
    return ('foo');
  },

  bar: function(req, res, next) {
    self.foo();
  }

}
4
  • Is this Node.js version specific? I am trying this with v5.8.0 and it is logging undefined. Commented Jul 15, 2016 at 15:38
  • 1
    @doublejosh Did... did you read the question? It's asking how you call one exported function from another. It has nothing to do with access restrictions.
    – anon
    Commented May 16, 2018 at 19:14
  • 1
    Yes I read it, please re-read. This answer makes foo() exported with the module, which goes against the point of a "local" function only called within the module.
    – doublejosh
    Commented May 18, 2018 at 19:34
  • This works great. I actually need foo() exported to be used outside, but also need to call it within sibling function. Thank you!
    – Paul
    Commented Jan 30, 2023 at 7:14
68

You can also save a reference to module's global scope outside the (module.)exports.somemodule definition:

var _this = this;

exports.somefunction = function() {
   console.log('hello');
}

exports.someotherfunction = function() {
   _this.somefunction();
}
5
  • It's more cleaner solution!
    – IvanZh
    Commented Dec 18, 2014 at 8:13
  • no need for the _this and you can simply use this where you need it
    – Yuki
    Commented Jul 4, 2018 at 13:30
  • used this directly, no need to declare _this
    – Darius
    Commented Oct 12, 2018 at 10:34
  • 2
    That suggestion is useful once this is no longer the right this. (Promises and callbacks) Commented Mar 14, 2019 at 21:21
  • I like this solution the best because it also gives an example of scoping in NodeJS modules.
    – emonigma
    Commented Apr 3, 2020 at 18:21
43

Another option, and closer to the original style of the OP, is to put the object you want to export into a variable and reference that variable to make calls to other methods in the object. You can then export that variable and you're good to go.

var self = {
  foo: function (req, res, next) {
    return ('foo');
  },
  bar: function (req, res, next) {
    return self.foo();
  }
};
module.exports = self;
0
28
const Service = {
  foo: (a, b) => a + b,
  bar: (a, b) => Service.foo(a, b) * b
}

module.exports = Service
3
  • 3
    This is particularly usable because your code there is calling Service.foo(), and your client code will also be calling Service.foo() with the same naming. Commented Jan 31, 2018 at 11:57
  • This is a perfect answer! Commented Aug 30, 2018 at 23:18
  • I used it with Salesforce lwc and it works perfectly, I like this clean method Commented Nov 3, 2022 at 17:46
21

Starting with Node.js version 13 you can take advantage of ES6 Modules.

export function foo() {
    return 'foo';
}

export function bar() {
    return foo();
}

Following the Class approach:

class MyClass {

    foo() {
        return 'foo';
    }

    bar() {
        return this.foo();
    }
}

module.exports = new MyClass();

This will instantiate the class only once, due to Node's module caching:
https://nodejs.org/api/modules.html#modules_caching

4
  • and how does one call a static method with this approach?
    – Plixxer
    Commented Jun 7, 2018 at 20:55
  • @CodeofGod Just call it as you would call any other static method. In this case, if foo was static you would call it from inside bar like this: MyClass.foo().
    – m.spyratos
    Commented Jun 7, 2018 at 21:08
  • yeah i get that, but how would you call it from a controller that is importing it like... const oAccounts = require("...");
    – Plixxer
    Commented Jun 7, 2018 at 21:11
  • You can export the actual class, not an instance of the class. That way you can use its static methods. If you then need to use its instance methods though, then you will have to instantiate the class in your controller.
    – m.spyratos
    Commented Jun 8, 2018 at 0:44
8

To fix your issue, i have made few changes in bla.js and it is working,

var foo= function (req, res, next) {
  console.log('inside foo');
  return ("foo");
}

var  bar= function(req, res, next) {
  this.foo();
}
module.exports = {bar,foo};

and no modification in app.js

var bla = require('./bla.js');
console.log(bla.bar());
1
  • 3
    In the function bar, this.foo() doesn't work... it needs to be foo()
    – Falcoa
    Commented May 17, 2019 at 5:26
0

What I do is to create a standalone foo function and reference it in both places.

That way, it prevents any issue with this irrespective of using an arrow or regular function

function foo(req,res,next) {
  return ('foo');
}

Then I can reference foo at both places

module.exports = {

  foo, // ES6 for foo:foo

  bar: function(req, res, next) {
    foo();
  }

}
0

If you do like this, you will be losing your this object reference inside your calling function. For eg:

    module.exports.a = function () {
      return true
    }
    
    module.exports.b = function() {
      return this.a();
    }

here you will get the issue because when you call this.a(), it is referencing the this object of the b function.

To solve this your have to store your this object reference somewhere or use the arrow function, because the arrow function doesn't have there own this object so it will always reference the outer this object

To solve this, modify your function like this

    module.exports.a = function () {
      return true
    }
    
    module.exports.b = () => {
      return this.a();
    }

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