121

I am looking for a JavaScript function that can compare two strings and return the likeliness that they are alike. I have looked at soundex but that's not really great for multi-word strings or non-names. I am looking for a function like:

    function compare(strA,strB){
    
    }
    
    compare("Apples","apple") = Some X Percentage.

The function would work with all types of strings, including numbers, multi-word values, and names. Perhaps there's a simple algorithm I could use?

Ultimately none of these served my purpose so I used this:

     function compare(c, u) {
            var incept = false;
            var ca = c.split(",");
            u = clean(u);
            //ca = correct answer array (Collection of all correct answer)
            //caa = a single correct answer word array (collection of words of a single correct answer)
            //u = array of user answer words cleaned using custom clean function
            for (var z = 0; z < ca.length; z++) {
                caa = $.trim(ca[z]).split(" ");
                var pc = 0;
                for (var x = 0; x < caa.length; x++) {
                    for (var y = 0; y < u.length; y++) {
                        if (soundex(u[y]) != null && soundex(caa[x]) != null) {
                            if (soundex(u[y]) == soundex(caa[x])) {
                                pc = pc + 1;
                            }
                        }
                        else {
                            if (u[y].indexOf(caa[x]) > -1) {
                                pc = pc + 1;
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
                if ((pc / caa.length) > 0.5) {
                    return true;
                }
            }
            return false;
        }
        
        // create object listing the SOUNDEX values for each letter
        // -1 indicates that the letter is not coded, but is used for coding
        //  0 indicates that the letter is omitted for modern census archives
        //                              but acts like -1 for older census archives
        //  1 is for BFPV
        //  2 is for CGJKQSXZ
        //  3 is for DT
        //  4 is for L
        //  5 is for MN my home state
        //  6 is for R
        function makesoundex() {
            this.a = -1
            this.b = 1
            this.c = 2
            this.d = 3
            this.e = -1
            this.f = 1
            this.g = 2
            this.h = 0
            this.i = -1
            this.j = 2
            this.k = 2
            this.l = 4
            this.m = 5
            this.n = 5
            this.o = -1
            this.p = 1
            this.q = 2
            this.r = 6
            this.s = 2
            this.t = 3
            this.u = -1
            this.v = 1
            this.w = 0
            this.x = 2
            this.y = -1
            this.z = 2
        }
        
        var sndx = new makesoundex()
        
        // check to see that the input is valid
        function isSurname(name) {
            if (name == "" || name == null) {
                return false
            } else {
                for (var i = 0; i < name.length; i++) {
                    var letter = name.charAt(i)
                    if (!(letter >= 'a' && letter <= 'z' || letter >= 'A' && letter <= 'Z')) {
                        return false
                    }
                }
            }
            return true
        }
        
        // Collapse out directly adjacent sounds
        // 1. Assume that surname.length>=1
        // 2. Assume that surname contains only lowercase letters
        function collapse(surname) {
            if (surname.length == 1) {
                return surname
            }
            var right = collapse(surname.substring(1, surname.length))
            if (sndx[surname.charAt(0)] == sndx[right.charAt(0)]) {
                return surname.charAt(0) + right.substring(1, right.length)
            }
            return surname.charAt(0) + right
        }
        
        // Collapse out directly adjacent sounds using the new National Archives method
        // 1. Assume that surname.length>=1
        // 2. Assume that surname contains only lowercase letters
        // 3. H and W are completely ignored
        function omit(surname) {
            if (surname.length == 1) {
                return surname
            }
            var right = omit(surname.substring(1, surname.length))
            if (!sndx[right.charAt(0)]) {
                return surname.charAt(0) + right.substring(1, right.length)
            }
            return surname.charAt(0) + right
        }
        
        // Output the coded sequence
        function output_sequence(seq) {
            var output = seq.charAt(0).toUpperCase() // Retain first letter
            output += "-" // Separate letter with a dash
            var stage2 = seq.substring(1, seq.length)
            var count = 0
            for (var i = 0; i < stage2.length && count < 3; i++) {
                if (sndx[stage2.charAt(i)] > 0) {
                    output += sndx[stage2.charAt(i)]
                    count++
                }
            }
            for (; count < 3; count++) {
                output += "0"
            }
            return output
        }
        
        // Compute the SOUNDEX code for the surname
        function soundex(value) {
            if (!isSurname(value)) {
                return null
            }
            var stage1 = collapse(value.toLowerCase())
            //form.result.value=output_sequence(stage1);
        
            var stage1 = omit(value.toLowerCase())
            var stage2 = collapse(stage1)
            return output_sequence(stage2);
        
        }
        
        function clean(u) {
            var u = u.replace(/\,/g, "");
            u = u.toLowerCase().split(" ");
            var cw = ["ARRAY OF WORDS TO BE EXCLUDED FROM COMPARISON"];
            var n = [];
            for (var y = 0; y < u.length; y++) {
                var test = false;
                for (var z = 0; z < cw.length; z++) {
                    if (u[y] != "" && u[y] != cw[z]) {
                        test = true;
                        break;
                    }
                }
                if (test) {
        //Don't use & or $ in comparison
                    var val = u[y].replace("$", "").replace("&", "");
                    n.push(val);
                }
            }
            return n;
        }
3

9 Answers 9

198

Here's an answer based on Levenshtein distance https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Levenshtein_distance

function similarity(s1, s2) {
  var longer = s1;
  var shorter = s2;
  if (s1.length < s2.length) {
    longer = s2;
    shorter = s1;
  }
  var longerLength = longer.length;
  if (longerLength == 0) {
    return 1.0;
  }
  return (longerLength - editDistance(longer, shorter)) / parseFloat(longerLength);
}

For calculating edit distance

function editDistance(s1, s2) {
  s1 = s1.toLowerCase();
  s2 = s2.toLowerCase();

  var costs = new Array();
  for (var i = 0; i <= s1.length; i++) {
    var lastValue = i;
    for (var j = 0; j <= s2.length; j++) {
      if (i == 0)
        costs[j] = j;
      else {
        if (j > 0) {
          var newValue = costs[j - 1];
          if (s1.charAt(i - 1) != s2.charAt(j - 1))
            newValue = Math.min(Math.min(newValue, lastValue),
              costs[j]) + 1;
          costs[j - 1] = lastValue;
          lastValue = newValue;
        }
      }
    }
    if (i > 0)
      costs[s2.length] = lastValue;
  }
  return costs[s2.length];
}

Usage

similarity('Stack Overflow','Stack Ovrflw')

returns 0.8571428571428571


You can play with it below:

function checkSimilarity(){
  var str1 = document.getElementById("lhsInput").value;
  var str2 = document.getElementById("rhsInput").value;
  document.getElementById("output").innerHTML = similarity(str1, str2);
}

function similarity(s1, s2) {
      var longer = s1;
      var shorter = s2;
      if (s1.length < s2.length) {
        longer = s2;
        shorter = s1;
      }
      var longerLength = longer.length;
      if (longerLength == 0) {
        return 1.0;
      }
      return (longerLength - editDistance(longer, shorter)) / parseFloat(longerLength);
    }

    function editDistance(s1, s2) {
      s1 = s1.toLowerCase();
      s2 = s2.toLowerCase();

      var costs = new Array();
      for (var i = 0; i <= s1.length; i++) {
        var lastValue = i;
        for (var j = 0; j <= s2.length; j++) {
          if (i == 0)
            costs[j] = j;
          else {
            if (j > 0) {
              var newValue = costs[j - 1];
              if (s1.charAt(i - 1) != s2.charAt(j - 1))
                newValue = Math.min(Math.min(newValue, lastValue),
                  costs[j]) + 1;
              costs[j - 1] = lastValue;
              lastValue = newValue;
            }
          }
        }
        if (i > 0)
          costs[s2.length] = lastValue;
      }
      return costs[s2.length];
    }
<div><label for="lhsInput">String 1:</label> <input type="text" id="lhsInput" oninput="checkSimilarity()" /></div>
<div><label for="rhsInput">String 2:</label> <input type="text" id="rhsInput" oninput="checkSimilarity()" /></div>
<div>Match: <span id="output">No Input</span></div>

10
  • 1
    An improvement for several words: var similarity2 = function(s1, s2){ var split1 = s1.split(' '); var split2 = s2.split(' '); var sum = 0; var max = 0; var temp = 0; for(var i=0; i<split1.length;i++){ max = 0; for(var j=0; j<split2.length;j++){ temp = similarity(split1[i], split2[j]); if(max < temp) max = temp; } console.log(max); sum += max / split1.length; } return sum; };
    – infinito84
    May 9, 2017 at 19:50
  • @overlord1234 Does the method above works for string like this: 9e27dbb9ff6eea70821c02b4457cbc6b7eb8e12a64f46c192c3a05f1bc1519acd101193dac157c6233d9d773f9b364ca210d6287f9efa00bfc656746782905be ?
    – QWERTY
    Oct 5, 2017 at 13:53
  • It does work with strings without a semantic attached to it. Please try and run the in-line code snippet (thanks to David). I get a similarity of 0.17857142857142858 when I input the aforementioned strings. Oct 12, 2017 at 19:44
  • 1
    However, it is too slow for long strings.
    – upupming
    Jan 17, 2019 at 2:14
  • 1
    But it doesn't work for caps. It's not case sensitive!
    – user10021033
    Aug 27, 2021 at 13:36
20

Using this library for string similarity worked like a charm for me!

Here's the Example -

var similarity = stringSimilarity.compareTwoStrings("Apples","apple");    // => 0.88
6
  • 16
    That's great, except stringSimilarity has a dependancy called lodash which contains over 1,000 files being put into your project just so you can get string similarity. Jul 17, 2018 at 14:08
  • 3
    Yeah, it happens while adding a package locally. But instead, we can use CDN to for a lesser bundle size. Here are the CDN links - jsdelivr.com/package/npm/lodash - jsdelivr.com/package/npm/string-similarity Jul 17, 2018 at 14:20
  • 8
    They have removed most dependencies, including lodash Nov 9, 2019 at 3:24
  • It is a strange, but "KIA" and "Kia" will produce 0.0. ¯_(ツ)_/¯
    – Nigrimmist
    Feb 14 at 21:16
  • @Nigrimmist, you may try with converting them toLowerCase in that case. Feb 15 at 14:08
15

Here is a very simple function that does a comparison and returns a percentage based on equivalency. While it has not been tested for all possible scenarios, it may help you get started.

function similar(a,b) {
    var equivalency = 0;
    var minLength = (a.length > b.length) ? b.length : a.length;    
    var maxLength = (a.length < b.length) ? b.length : a.length;    
    for(var i = 0; i < minLength; i++) {
        if(a[i] == b[i]) {
            equivalency++;
        }
    }
    

    var weight = equivalency / maxLength;
    return (weight * 100) + "%";
}
alert(similar("test","tes"));   // 75%
alert(similar("test","test"));  // 100%
alert(similar("test","testt")); // 80%
alert(similar("test","tess"));  // 75%
1
  • 21
    The problem with this is that "atest" and "test" return 0%, which we know isn't true. Jan 25, 2016 at 8:49
11

To Find degree of similarity between two strings; we can use more than one or two methods but I am mostly inclined towards the usage of 'Dice's Coefficient' . which is better! well in my knowledge than using 'Levenshtein distance'

Using this 'string-similarity' package from npm you will be able to work on what I said above.

some easy usage examples are

var stringSimilarity = require('string-similarity');

var similarity = stringSimilarity.compareTwoStrings('healed', 'sealed'); 

var matches = stringSimilarity.findBestMatch('healed', ['edward', 'sealed', 'theatre']);

for more please visit the link given above. Thankyou.

1
7

Just one I quickly wrote that might be good enough for your purposes:

function Compare(strA,strB){
    for(var result = 0, i = strA.length; i--;){
        if(typeof strB[i] == 'undefined' || strA[i] == strB[i]);
        else if(strA[i].toLowerCase() == strB[i].toLowerCase())
            result++;
        else
            result += 4;
    }
    return 1 - (result + 4*Math.abs(strA.length - strB.length))/(2*(strA.length+strB.length));
}

This weighs characters that are the same but different case 1 quarter as heavily as characters that are completely different or missing. It returns a number between 0 and 1, 1 meaning the strings are identical. 0 meaning they have no similarities. Examples:

Compare("Apple", "Apple")    // 1
Compare("Apples", "Apple")   // 0.8181818181818181
Compare("Apples", "apple")   // 0.7727272727272727
Compare("a", "A")            // 0.75
Compare("Apples", "appppp")  // 0.45833333333333337
Compare("a", "b")            // 0
5
  • 8
    Not so accurate: Compare("Apple", "zApple") = 0.07 , while Compare("Apple", "Applez") = 0.84
    – Kousha
    Mar 5, 2016 at 0:04
  • 3
    @Kousha , it's positional. "Apple" and "zApple" only have one letter in common (the second p).
    – Paul
    Mar 5, 2016 at 0:13
  • 2
    @Paulpro Apple, and zApple have five letters in common logically. It is your implementation fault. Apple, zApple, Applez are similar.
    – Kousha
    Mar 5, 2016 at 17:52
  • 2
    @Kousha, zApple isn't similar according to this algorithm, since it's positional. That doesn't make the algorithm incorrect.
    – Paul
    Mar 5, 2016 at 19:35
  • 11
    @Paulpro: That doesn't make your algorithm incorrect, but makes it a poor answer for this question...
    – MarcoS
    Jun 3, 2017 at 11:55
6

How about function similar_text from PHP.js library?

It is based on a PHP function with the same name.

function similar_text (first, second) {
    // Calculates the similarity between two strings  
    // discuss at: http://phpjs.org/functions/similar_text

    if (first === null || second === null || typeof first === 'undefined' || typeof second === 'undefined') {
        return 0;
    }

    first += '';
    second += '';

    var pos1 = 0,
        pos2 = 0,
        max = 0,
        firstLength = first.length,
        secondLength = second.length,
        p, q, l, sum;

    max = 0;

    for (p = 0; p < firstLength; p++) {
        for (q = 0; q < secondLength; q++) {
            for (l = 0;
            (p + l < firstLength) && (q + l < secondLength) && (first.charAt(p + l) === second.charAt(q + l)); l++);
            if (l > max) {
                max = l;
                pos1 = p;
                pos2 = q;
            }
        }
    }

    sum = max;

    if (sum) {
        if (pos1 && pos2) {
            sum += this.similar_text(first.substr(0, pos2), second.substr(0, pos2));
        }

        if ((pos1 + max < firstLength) && (pos2 + max < secondLength)) {
            sum += this.similar_text(first.substr(pos1 + max, firstLength - pos1 - max), second.substr(pos2 + max, secondLength - pos2 - max));
        }
    }

    return sum;
}
1
  • 1
    Is the similarity returned based on matching character? How does it evaluate the similarity
    – QWERTY
    Oct 5, 2017 at 13:48
2

fuzzyset - A fuzzy string set for javascript. fuzzyset is a data structure that performs something akin to fulltext search against data to determine likely mispellings and approximate string matching. Note that this is a javascript port of a python library.

1

To some extent, I like the ideas of Dice's coefficient embedded in the string-similarity module. But I feel that considering the bigrams only and not taking into account their multiplicities is missing some important data. Below is a version that also handles multiplicities, and I think is a simpler implementation overall. I don't try to use their API, offering only a function which compares two strings after some manipulation (removing non-alphanumeric characters, lower-casing everything, and compressing but not removing whitespace), built atop one which compares them without that manipulation. It would be easy enough to wrap this back in their API, but I see little need.

const stringSimilarity = (a, b) =>
  _stringSimilarity (prep (a), prep (b))

const _stringSimilarity = (a, b) => {
  const bg1 = bigrams (a)
  const bg2 = bigrams (b)
  const c1 = count (bg1)
  const c2 = count (bg2)
  const combined = uniq ([... bg1, ... bg2]) 
    .reduce ((t, k) => t + (Math .min (c1 [k] || 0, c2 [k] || 0)), 0)
  return 2 * combined / (bg1 .length + bg2 .length)
}

const prep = (str) => // TODO: unicode support?
  str .toLowerCase () .replace (/[^\w\s]/g, ' ') .replace (/\s+/g, ' ')

const bigrams = (str) => 
  [...str] .slice (0, -1) .map ((c, i) => c + str [i + 1])

const count = (xs) => 
  xs .reduce ((a, x) => ((a [x] = (a [x] || 0) + 1), a), {})

const uniq = (xs) => 
  [... new Set (xs)]

console .log (stringSimilarity (
  'foobar', 
  'Foobar'
)) //=> 1

console .log (stringSimilarity (
  "healed", 
  "sealed"
))//=> 0.8

console .log (stringSimilarity (
  "Olive-green table for sale, in extremely good condition.",
  "For sale: table in very good  condition, olive green in colour."
)) //=> 0.7787610619469026

console .log (stringSimilarity (
  "Olive-green table for sale, in extremely good condition.",
  "For sale: green Subaru Impreza, 210,000 miles"
)) //=> 0.38636363636363635

console .log (stringSimilarity (
  "Olive-green table for sale, in extremely good condition.",
  "Wanted: mountain bike with at least 21 gears."
)) //=> 0.1702127659574468

console .log (stringSimilarity (
  "The rain in Spain falls mainly on the plain.",
  "The run in Spun falls munly on the plun.",
)) //=> 0.7560975609756098

console .log (stringSimilarity (
  "Fa la la la la, la la la la",
  "Fa la la la la, la la",
)) //=> 0.8636363636363636

console .log (stringSimilarity (
  "car crash",
  "carcrash",
)) //=> 0.8

console .log (stringSimilarity (
  "Now is the time for all good men to come to the aid of their party.",
  "Huh?",
)) //=> 0
.as-console-wrapper {max-height: 100% !important; top: 0}

Some of the test cases are from string-similarity, others are my own. They show some significant differences from that package, but nothing untoward. The only one I would call out is the difference between "car crash" and "carcrash", which string-similarity sees as identical and I report with a similarity of 0.8. My version finds more similarity in all the olive-green test-cases than does string-similarity, but as these are in any case fairly arbitrary numbers, I'm not sure how much difference it makes; they certainly position them in the same relative order.

-1

string-similarity lib vs Top answer (by @overloard1234) performance comparation you can find below

Based on @Tushar Walzade's advice to use string-similarity library, you can find, that for example

stringSimilatityLib.findBestMatch('KIA','Kia').bestMatch.rating 

will return 0.0

So, looks like better to compare it in lowerCase.

Better base usage (for arrays) :

findBestMatch(str, strArr) {
   const lowerCaseArr = strArr.map(element => element.toLowerCase());//creating lower case array
   const match = stringSimilatityLib.findBestMatch(str.toLowerCase(), lowerCaseArr).bestMatch; //trying to find bestMatch
   if (match.rating > 0) {
      const foundIndex = lowerCaseArr.findIndex(x => x === match.target); //finding the index of found best case
      return strArr[foundIndex]; //returning initial value from array
   }
    return null;
},

Performance

Also, i compared top answer here (made by @overloard1234) and string-similarity lib (v4.0.4).

The results you can find here : https://jsbench.me/szkzojoskq/1

Perf tests

Result : string-similarity is ~ twice faster

Just for fun : v2.0 of string-similarity library slower, than latest 4.0.4 about 2.2 times. So update it, if you are still using < 3.0 :)

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