This question already has an answer here:

So I am making a script that adds two numbers (decimal numbers) together, which I have encountered a problem.

http://jsfiddle.net/DerekL/esqnC/

I made the script, it turns out pretty good:

0.1 + 0.5  //0.6
0.2 + 0.3  //0.5

But soon I see:

0.1 + 0.2  //0.30000000000000004
0.01 + 0.06  //0.06999999999999999

And it does not look right to me. I know it is a shortcoming of using float point with finite bits, but I can't find a way to fix that.

Math.ceil   //No
Math.floor  //No
.slice      //No

UPDATE

Is it possible to multiply the numbers by 1000 first, then add them then divide it by 1000?

marked as duplicate by Liam, Hugo Dozois, Bergi javascript Jul 11 '14 at 1:14

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • This is not a bug, simply real values have a fixed precision, so doing computations on real values may result in some small errors. – Kru May 6 '12 at 20:31
  • Math.round()? – kapa May 6 '12 at 20:32
  • 1
    Math.round(0.1 + 0.2) is 0. – Gazler May 6 '12 at 20:33
  • 1
    @Gazler - I need how to fix it, not why it happens. – Derek 朕會功夫 May 6 '12 at 20:33
  • 1
    @Gazler Congrats :). Of course you will apply some math to decide the precision you need. On the other hand, everybody understands the issue that creates the situation in the question, but one thing is unclear to me: what is the expected output? – kapa May 6 '12 at 20:34
up vote 40 down vote accepted

Use toFixed to convert it to a string with some decimal places shaved off, and then convert it back to a number.

+(0.1 + 0.2).toFixed(12) // 0.3

It looks like IE's toFixed has some weird behavior, so if you need to support IE something like this might be better:

Math.round((0.1 + 0.2) * 1e12) / 1e12
  • nice, works: jsfiddle.net/esqnC/5 – beardhatcode May 6 '12 at 20:44
  • Does toFixed work on IE? – Derek 朕會功夫 May 6 '12 at 20:49
  • 3
    @Derek after reading through some of the comments on the question linked as a duplicate, it looks like IE's toFixed might truncate instead of round. It might be safer to do something like this: Math.round((0.1 + 0.2) * 1e12) / 1e12 – Dagg Nabbit May 6 '12 at 20:55
  • @GGG Math.round() is a great idea :) – kapa May 6 '12 at 21:01
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    @GGG: probably. You toFixed solution worked here anyway: jsfiddle.net/KooiInc/D7ULx – KooiInc May 6 '12 at 21:28
function add(){
    var first=parseFloat($("#first").val());
    var second=parseFloat($("#second").val());
    $("#result").val(+(first+second).toFixed(2));
}

DEMO.

Testing this Javascript:

var arr = [1234563995.721, 12345691212.718, 1234568421.5891, 12345677093.49284];

var sum = 0;
for( var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++ ) {
    sum += arr[i];
}

alert( "fMath(sum) = " + Math.round( sum * 1e12 ) / 1e12 );
alert( "fFixed(sum) = " + sum.toFixed( 5 ) );

Conclusion

Dont use Math.round( (## + ## + ... + ##) * 1e12) / 1e12

Instead, use ( ## + ## + ... + ##).toFixed(5) )

In IE 9, toFixed works very well.

  • 1
    Please give example of results, or at least create a fiddle – Dementic Mar 29 '16 at 12:42
  • What's your conclusion? – JCorriveau Oct 20 '16 at 18:44

This is common issue with floating points.

Use toFixed in combination with parseFloat.

Here is example in JavaScript.

  • Try it with 11200030006000.125 + 0.001 – KooiInc May 6 '12 at 21:13
  • You are right, KooiInc and I updated it to 12 digits precision. Still GGG's solution with Math.round((0.1 + 0.2) * 1e12) / 1e12 is elegant one! – Community Driven Business May 6 '12 at 21:18
  • But now the result is: 11200030006000.125 + 0.001 = 11200030006000.127. It should be 11200030006000.126 ... – KooiInc May 6 '12 at 21:25
  • It is strange indeed. I also tried GGG's solution (jsfiddle.net/49HGP/6) and it evaluates to 11200030006000.127 too. Do you have any ideas why this happens? – Community Driven Business May 6 '12 at 21:38
  • With numbers that big, I think it's just a problem with precision, not repeating decimals in binary. 10000000000000.126 == 10000000000000.127 // true – Dagg Nabbit May 6 '12 at 23:28

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