39

Sometimes I don't want to provide a default constructor, nor do I want the compiler to provide a system default constructor for my class. In C++ 11 I can do thing like:

class MyClass 
{ 
  public: 
    MyClass() = delete; 
};

But currently my lecturer doesn't allow me to do that in my assignment. The question is: prior to C++ 11, is there any way to tell the compiler to stop implicitly provide a default constructor?

47

I would say make it private.. something like

class MyClass
{
private:
    MyClass();
}

and no one(from outside the class itself or friend classes) will be able to call the default constructor. Also, then you'll have three options for using the class: either to provide a parameterized constructor or use it as a utility class (one with static functions only) or to create a factory for this type in a friend class.

  • Scott Meyers in his book Effective Modern C++ writes, that also you can leave your private constructor without definition. It will help you to protect your default constructor from invoking from friend classes (link error will be thrown). – MrPisarik Jul 25 '16 at 14:48
13

Sure. Define your own constructor, default or otherwise.

You can also declare it as private so that it's impossible to call. This would, unfortunately, render your class completely unusable unless you provide a static function to call it.

0

Additionally to declaring the default constructor private, you could also throw an exception when somebody tries to call it.

class MyClass
{
  private:
    MyClass() 
    {
      throw [some exception];
    };
}
0

Since c++11, you can set constructor = delete. This is useful in conjunction with c++11's brace initialization syntax {}.

For example:

struct foo {
  int a;
  foo() = delete;
};

foo f{}; // error use of deleted function foo::foo()
foo f{3}; // OK

see https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/default_constructor#Deleted_implicitly-declared_default_constructor

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