7

How can I retrieve the current frame number of a video using OpenCV? Does OpenCV have any built-in function for getting the current frame or I have to do it manually?

19

You can use the "get" method of your capture object like below :

capture.get(CV_CAP_PROP_POS_FRAMES); // retrieves the current frame number

and also :

capture.get(CV_CAP_PROP_FRAME_COUNT); // retuns the number of total frames 

Btw, these methods return a double value.

You can also use cvGetCaptureProperty method.

cvGetCaptureProperty(CvCapture* capture,int property_id);

property_id options are below with definitions:

CV_CAP_PROP_POS_MSEC 0

CV_CAP_PROP_POS_FRAME 1

CV_CAP_PROP_POS_AVI_RATIO 2

CV_CAP_PROP_FRAME_WIDTH 3

CV_CAP_PROP_FRAME_HEIGHT 4

CV_CAP_PROP_FPS 5

CV_CAP_PROP_FOURCC 6

CV_CAP_PROP_FRAME_COUNT 7

POS_MSEC is the current position in a video file, measured in milliseconds. POS_FRAME is the current position in frame number. POS_AVI_RATIO is the position given as a number between 0 and 1 (this is actually quite useful when you want to position a trackbar to allow folks to navigate around your video). FRAME_WIDTH and FRAME_HEIGHT are the dimensions of the individual frames of the video to be read (or to be captured at the camera’s current settings). FPS is specifi c to video files and indicates the number of frames per second at which the video was captured; you will need to know this if you want to play back your video and have it come out at the right speed. FOURCC is the four-character code for the compression codec to be used for the video you are currently reading. FRAME_COUNT should be the total number of frames in the video, but this fi gure is not entirely reliable. (from Learning OpenCV book )

  • 1
    Thank you very much. It was helpful :) – Ruhi Akaboy May 6 '12 at 23:45
3

The way of doing it in OpenCV python is like this:

import cv2
cam = cv2.VideoCapture(<filename>);
print cam.get(cv2.cv.CV_CAP_PROP_POS_FRAMES)
2

In openCV version 3.4, the correct flag is:

cap.get(cv2.CAP_PROP_POS_FRAMES)

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