178

I want to try to convert a string to a Guid, but I don't want to rely on catching exceptions (

  • for performance reasons - exceptions are expensive
  • for usability reasons - the debugger pops up
  • for design reasons - the expected is not exceptional

In other words the code:

public static Boolean TryStrToGuid(String s, out Guid value)
{
    try
    {
        value = new Guid(s);
        return true;
    }
    catch (FormatException)
    {
        value = Guid.Empty;
        return false;
    }
}

is not suitable.

I would try using RegEx, but since the guid can be parenthesis wrapped, brace wrapped, none wrapped, makes it hard.

Additionally, I thought certain Guid values are invalid(?)


Update 1

ChristianK had a good idea to catch only FormatException, rather than all. Changed the question's code sample to include suggestion.


Update 2

Why worry about thrown exceptions? Am I really expecting invalid GUIDs all that often?

The answer is yes. That is why I am using TryStrToGuid - I am expecting bad data.

Example 1 Namespace extensions can be specified by appending a GUID to a folder name. I might be parsing folder names, checking to see if the text after the final . is a GUID.

c:\Program Files
c:\Program Files.old
c:\Users
c:\Users.old
c:\UserManager.{CE7F5AA5-6832-43FE-BAE1-80D14CD8F666}
c:\Windows
c:\Windows.old

Example 2 I might be running a heavily used web-server wants to check the validity of some posted back data. I don't want invalid data tying up resources 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than it needs to be.

Example 3 I might be parsing a search expression entered by a user.

enter image description here

If they enter GUID's I want to process them specially (such as specifically searching for that object, or highlight and format that specific search term in the response text.)


Update 3 - Performance benchmarks

Test converting 10,000 good Guids, and 10,000 bad Guids.

Catch FormatException:
   10,000 good:     63,668 ticks
   10,000 bad:   6,435,609 ticks

Regex Pre-Screen with try-catch:
   10,000 good:    637,633 ticks
   10,000 bad:     717,894 ticks

COM Interop CLSIDFromString
   10,000 good:    126,120 ticks
   10,000 bad:      23,134 ticks

p.s. I shouldn't have to justify a question.

  • 7
    Why in the world is this a community wiki? – Jeff Mar 13 '10 at 15:32
  • 34
    You're right; you should not have to justify a question. However, i read the justification with interest (as it's very similar to why i'm here reading this). So, thanks for the great justification. – b w Aug 9 '10 at 20:19
  • 2
    @Jeff likely becasue the OP has edited it more than 10 times - see meta on community wiki – Marijn Jul 6 '11 at 18:13
  • 3
    Please keep looking on this page for solutions with Guid.TryParse or Guid.TryParseExact. With .NET 4.0 + the above solution is not the most elegant – dplante Feb 28 '14 at 16:02
  • 1
    @dplante When i originally asked the question in 2008, there was no 4.0. That's why the question, and accepted answer, are the way they are. – Ian Boyd May 20 '14 at 18:15

18 Answers 18

107

Performance Benchmarks

Catch exception:
   10,000 good:    63,668 ticks
   10,000 bad:  6,435,609 ticks

Regex Pre-Screen:
   10,000 good:   637,633 ticks
   10,000 bad:    717,894 ticks

COM Interop CLSIDFromString
   10,000 good:   126,120 ticks
   10,000 bad:     23,134 ticks

COM Intertop (Fastest) Answer:

/// <summary>
/// Attempts to convert a string to a guid.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="s">The string to try to convert</param>
/// <param name="value">Upon return will contain the Guid</param>
/// <returns>Returns true if successful, otherwise false</returns>
public static Boolean TryStrToGuid(String s, out Guid value)
{
   //ClsidFromString returns the empty guid for null strings   
   if ((s == null) || (s == ""))   
   {      
      value = Guid.Empty;      
      return false;   
   }

   int hresult = PInvoke.ObjBase.CLSIDFromString(s, out value);
   if (hresult >= 0)
   {
      return true;
   }
   else
   {
      value = Guid.Empty;
      return false;
   }
}


namespace PInvoke
{
    class ObjBase
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// This function converts a string generated by the StringFromCLSID function back into the original class identifier.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="sz">String that represents the class identifier</param>
        /// <param name="clsid">On return will contain the class identifier</param>
        /// <returns>
        /// Positive or zero if class identifier was obtained successfully
        /// Negative if the call failed
        /// </returns>
        [DllImport("ole32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Unicode, ExactSpelling = true, PreserveSig = true)]
        public static extern int CLSIDFromString(string sz, out Guid clsid);
    }
}

Bottom line: If you need to check if a string is a guid, and you care about performance, use COM Interop.

If you need to convert a guid in String representation to a Guid, use

new Guid(someString);
  • 11
    Upvoting to cancel the stupidest downvote I've ever seen. – Joshua May 23 '09 at 14:47
  • Now that's some good info. – Mike Cole Aug 16 '09 at 14:57
  • 8
    Did you run these with debugger on or off? The performance of exception throwing is improved by several-fold without attaching the debugger. – Daniel T. Jan 15 '10 at 0:41
  • thank you. I was about to ask this question myself. Glad I found your answer. – David Apr 12 '10 at 19:25
  • I have created a new file called PInvoke.cs with the namespace PInvoke code snippet from up above, but I cannot get the code to work. When I debug I see that the result of CLSIDFromString is ALWAYS negative. I tried changing the calling line to: int hresult = PInvoke.ObjBase.CLSIDFromString(Guid.NewGuid().ToString(), out value); but it is still always negative. What am I doing wrong? – JALLRED Feb 20 '14 at 21:14
88

Once .net 4.0 is available you can use Guid.TryParse().

  • 8
    One even faster way is by using Guid.TryParseExact() method. – user586254 Mar 30 '11 at 8:34
  • 4
    If parsing Guid strings is the slowest part of your application then you are blessed. – No Refunds No Returns May 31 '17 at 14:46
66

You're not going to like this but what makes you think that catching the exception is going to be slower?

How many failed attempts to parse a GUID are you expecting in comparison with successful ones?

My advice is use the function you've just created and profile your code. If you find that this function is truely a hotspot then fix it but not before.

  • 2
    Good answer, premature optimisation is the root of all evil. – Kev Sep 19 '08 at 19:45
  • 33
    It's poor form to rely on exceptions that are not exceptional. It's a bad habit that i wouldn't want anyone to get into. And i especially wouldn't want do it in a library routine where people will be trusting that it works and well. – Ian Boyd Sep 22 '08 at 14:32
  • Anonymous, your original question stated performance as the reason you wanted to avoid exceptions. If that isn't so then perhaps you should tweak your question. – AnthonyWJones Sep 23 '08 at 10:01
  • 6
    Exception should be used in EXCEPTIONNAL cases 'meaning : not managed by the developer. I'm an opponent to Microsoft 'all exception' way of managing errors. Defensive programming rules. Please Microsoft framework developpers, consider adding a 'TryParse' to the Guid class. – Mose Jan 29 '10 at 9:11
  • 14
    in response to my own comment => Guid.TryParse has been added to framework 4.0 --- msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… --- thxs MS for such a quick reaction ;) – Mose Jan 29 '10 at 9:28
39

In .NET 4.0 you can write as following:

public static bool IsValidGuid(string str)
{
    Guid guid;
    return Guid.TryParse(str, out guid);
}
  • 3
    This should really be one of the top answers. – Tom Lint Aug 26 '14 at 14:44
21

I would at least rewrite it as:

try
{
  value = new Guid(s);
  return true;
}
catch (FormatException)
{
  value = Guid.Empty;
  return false;
}

You don't want to say "invalid GUID" on SEHException, ThreadAbortException or other fatal or non-related stuff.

Update: Starting with .NET 4.0, there is a new set of methods available for Guid:

Really, those should be used (if only for the fact, that they are not "naively" implemented using try-catch internally).

  • 1
    That was a good note, and i added it to my original. – Ian Boyd Dec 3 '08 at 15:04
  • Guid.TryParseExcat => Guid.TryParseExact – Bob Jan 16 '14 at 3:29
  • @Bob Thanks, typo fixed. The link should have worked however. – Christian.K Jan 16 '14 at 5:09
13

Interop is slower than just catching the exception:

In the happy path, with 10,000 Guids:

Exception:    26ms
Interop:   1,201ms

In the unhappy path:

Exception: 1,150ms
  Interop: 1,201ms

It's more consistent, but it's also consistently slower. Seems to me you'd be better off configuring your debugger to only break on unhandled exceptions.

  • "your debugger to only break on unhandled exceptions" Not an option. – Ian Boyd May 27 '09 at 11:40
  • 1
    @Ian Boyd - If you're using any of the VS editions (including Express), it is an option. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/038tzxdw.aspx. – Mark Brackett May 27 '09 at 12:59
  • 1
    i meant it's not a feasable option. Like, "Failure is not an option." It is an option, but one that i am not going to use. – Ian Boyd May 27 '09 at 17:50
9

Well, here is the regex you will need...

^[A-Fa-f0-9]{32}$|^({|\\()?[A-Fa-f0-9]{8}-([A-Fa-f0-9]{4}-){3}[A-Fa-f0-9]{12}(}|\\))?$|^({)?[0xA-Fa-f0-9]{3,10}(, {0,1}[0xA-Fa-f0-9]{3,6}){2}, {0,1}({)([0xA-Fa-f0-9]{3,4}, {0,1}){7}[0xA-Fa-f0-9]{3,4}(}})$

But that is just for starters. You will also have to verify that the various parts such as the date/time are within acceptable ranges. I can't imagine this being any faster than the try/catch method that you have already outlined. Hopefully you aren't receiving that many invalid GUIDs to warrant this type of check!

  • Um, IIRC GUIDs that are generated from a time stamp are generally considered to be a bad idea and the other kind (type 4) are totally randome – BCS May 25 '09 at 17:36
5

for usability reasons - the debugger pops up

If you're going for the try/catch approach you can add the [System.Diagnostics.DebuggerHidden] attribute to make sure the debugger doesn’t break even if you've set it to break on throw.

4

While it is true that using errors is more expensive, most people believe that a majority of their GUIDs are going to be computer generated so a TRY-CATCH isn't too expensive since it only generates cost on the CATCH. You can prove this to yourself with a simple test of the two (user public, no password).

Here you go:

using System.Text.RegularExpressions;


 /// <summary>
  /// Validate that a string is a valid GUID
  /// </summary>
  /// <param name="GUIDCheck"></param>
  /// <returns></returns>
  private bool IsValidGUID(string GUIDCheck)
  {
   if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(GUIDCheck))
   {
    return new Regex(@"^(\{{0,1}([0-9a-fA-F]){8}-([0-9a-fA-F]){4}-([0-9a-fA-F]){4}-([0-9a-fA-F]){4}-([0-9a-fA-F]){12}\}{0,1})$").IsMatch(GUIDCheck);
   }
   return false;
  }
4

I had a similar situation and I noticed that almost never was the invalid string 36 characters long. So based on this fact, I changed your code a little to get better performance while still keeping it simple.

public static Boolean TryStrToGuid(String s, out Guid value)
{

     // this is before the overhead of setting up the try/catch block.
     if(value == null || value.Length != 36)
     {  
        value = Guid.Empty;
        return false;
     }

    try
    {
        value = new Guid(s);
        return true;
    }
    catch (FormatException)
    {
        value = Guid.Empty;
        return false;
    }
}
  • 1
    Guid accepts more than just the dashed string form in its ctor. GUIDs can have surrounding curly braces with dashes, or be free of dashes or braces. This code will generate false negatives when used by those alternate but also perfectly valid string forms. – Chris Charabaruk Sep 26 '09 at 20:16
  • 1
    To follow up, the valid lengths for string-form GUIDs are 32, 36, and 38 -- pure hex, dashed, and braces-with-dashes, respectively. – Chris Charabaruk Sep 26 '09 at 20:18
  • 1
    @Chris, your point is valid, but @JBrooks idea of sanity checking the prospective GUID before barreling into try/catch makes sense, particularly if suspect input is common. Maybe something like if( value==null || value.Length < 30 || value.length > 40 ) {value=Guid.Empty;return false;} – b w Aug 9 '10 at 20:41
  • 1
    Indeed, that'd be better, although I'd keep the range tighter, 32..38 rather than 30..40. – Chris Charabaruk Aug 10 '10 at 3:07
2

As far as I know, there is no something like Guid.TryParse in mscrolib. According to Reference Source, Guid type has mega-complex constructor which checks all kinds of guid formats and tries to parse them. There is no helper method you can call, even via reflection. I think you have to search for 3rd party Guid parsers, or write your own.

2

Run the potential GUID though a RegEx or some custom code that does a sanity check to ensure the strig at least looks like a GUID and consists only of valid characters (and maybe that it seems to fit the overall format). If it doesn't pass the sanity check return an error - that'll probably weed out the vast majority of invalid strings.

Then convert the string as you have above, still catching the exception for the few invalid strings that get through the sanity check.

Jon Skeet did an analysis for something similar for parsing Ints (before TryParse was in the Framework): Checking if a string can be converted to Int32

However, as AnthonyWJones indicated you probably shouldn't be worrying about this.

1
 bool IsProbablyGuid(string s)
    {
        int hexchars = 0;
        foreach(character c in string s)
        {
           if(IsValidHexChar(c)) 
               hexchars++;          
        }
        return hexchars==32;
    }
  • "-" "{" "}"(" and ")" are not valid hex characters, but are valid in a guid string. – Preston Guillot Nov 18 '08 at 17:30
  • 2
    and this code will work perfectly well if the input guid string contains those non-hex characters – rupello May 22 '09 at 20:14
1
  • Get Reflector
  • copy'n'paste Guid's .ctor(String)
  • replace every occurance of "throw new ..." with "return false".

Guid's ctor is pretty much a compiled regex, that way you'll get exactly the same behavior without overhead of the exception.

  1. Does this constitute a reverse engineering? I think it does, and as such might be illegal.
  2. Will break if GUID form changes.

Even cooler solution would be to dynamically instrument a method, by replacing "throw new" on the fly.

  • 1
    i tried stealing the code from ctor, but it references many internal private classes to perform its support work. Believe me, that was my first try. – Ian Boyd May 28 '09 at 18:48
1

I vote for the GuidTryParse link posted above by Jon or a similar solution (IsProbablyGuid). I will be writing one like those for my Conversion library.

I think it is totally lame that this question has to be so complicated. The "is" or "as" keyword would be just fine IF a Guid could be null. But for some reason, even though SQL Server is OK with that, .NET is not. Why? What is the value of Guid.Empty? This is just a silly problem created by the design of .NET, and it really bugs me when the conventions of a language step on itself. The best-performing answer so far has been using COM Interop because the Framework doesn't handle it gracefully? "Can this string be a GUID?" should be a question that is easy to answer.

Relying on the exception being thrown is OK, until the app goes on the internet. At that point I just set myself up for a denial of service attack. Even if I don't get "attacked", I know some yahoo is going to monkey with the URL, or maybe my marketing department will send out a malformed link, and then my application has to suffer a fairly hefty performance hit that COULD bring down the server because I didn't write my code to handle a problem that SHOULDN'T happen, but we all know WILL HAPPEN.

This blurs the line a bit on "Exception" - but bottom line, even if the problem is infrequent, if it can happen enough times in a short timespan that your application crashes servicing the catches from it all, then I think throwing an exception is bad form.

TheRage3K

0

if TypeOf ctype(myvar,Object) Is Guid then .....

  • This appears to be VB.NET – Ian Boyd May 28 '09 at 18:49
0
Private Function IsGuidWithOptionalBraces(ByRef strValue As String) As Boolean
    If String.IsNullOrEmpty(strValue) Then
        Return False
    End If

    Return System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex.IsMatch(strValue, "^[\{]?[0-9a-fA-F]{8}\-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}\-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}\-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}\-[0-9a-fA-F]{12}[\}]?$", System.Text.RegularExpressions.RegexOptions.IgnoreCase)
End Function


Private Function IsGuidWithoutBraces(ByRef strValue As String) As Boolean
    If String.IsNullOrEmpty(strValue) Then
        Return False
    End If

    Return System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex.IsMatch(strValue, "^[0-9a-fA-F]{8}\-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}\-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}\-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}\-[0-9a-fA-F]{12}$", System.Text.RegularExpressions.RegexOptions.IgnoreCase)
End Function


Private Function IsGuidWithBraces(ByRef strValue As String) As Boolean
    If String.IsNullOrEmpty(strValue) Then
        Return False
    End If

    Return System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex.IsMatch(strValue, "^\{[0-9a-fA-F]{8}\-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}\-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}\-[0-9a-fA-F]{4}\-[0-9a-fA-F]{12}\}$", System.Text.RegularExpressions.RegexOptions.IgnoreCase)
End Function
0

With an extension method in C#

public static bool IsGUID(this string text)
{
    return Guid.TryParse(text, out Guid guid);
}

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