447

Is there anything similar to a slice.contains(object) method in Go without having to do a search through each element in a slice?

4

19 Answers 19

364

Mostafa has already pointed out that such a method is trivial to write, and mkb gave you a hint to use the binary search from the sort package. But if you are going to do a lot of such contains checks, you might also consider using a map instead.

It's trivial to check if a specific map key exists by using the value, ok := yourmap[key] idiom. Since you aren't interested in the value, you might also create a map[string]struct{} for example. Using an empty struct{} here has the advantage that it doesn't require any additional space and Go's internal map type is optimized for that kind of values. Therefore, map[string] struct{} is a popular choice for sets in the Go world.

8
  • 33
    Also note, that you have to write struct{}{} to get the value of the empty struct so that you can pass it to your map when you want to add an element. Just try it, and if you encounter any problems, feel free to ask. You can also use Mostafa's solution if that's easier for you to understand (unless you have huge amounts of data).
    – tux21b
    May 7, 2012 at 17:43
  • 19
    Solution is simple, that's true. But what it takes to add such basic functionality into runtime? I haven't found such issues in Go repo on github. That's sad and strange. May 23, 2017 at 6:06
  • 4
    How does map[string] bool compare with map[string] struct{}. map[string] struct{} seems like a hack especially initializing an empty struct struct {}{}
    – vadasambar
    Sep 12, 2019 at 12:17
  • 14
    @IgorPetrov agreed, I'm surprised such a basic feature is not in the runtime already.
    – jcollum
    Apr 21, 2020 at 19:06
  • 32
    Ridiculous that you have to add this yourself.
    – Snowcrash
    May 25, 2021 at 12:03
338

No, such method does not exist, but is trivial to write:

func contains(s []int, e int) bool {
    for _, a := range s {
        if a == e {
            return true
        }
    }
    return false
}

You can use a map if that lookup is an important part of your code, but maps have cost too.

8
  • 523
    Actually it's not trivial, because you have to write one for each type that you use, and because there's no overloading, you have to name each function differently, like in C. append() can work generically because it has special runtime support. A generic contains would be useful for the same reason, but really the generic solution is just generics support in the language.
    – Eloff
    Jul 12, 2014 at 18:00
  • 2
    @Alex Lockwood will this actually work with interfaces?
    – Ory Band
    Jan 7, 2015 at 18:31
  • 235
    trivial == 7 lines of code including 1 loop 1 branch if statement and 1 comparison? I think I'm missing something here ...
    – tothemario
    Oct 19, 2016 at 21:06
  • 90
    But why not add these in go core itself?
    – Surya
    Oct 17, 2019 at 7:37
  • 21
    What's the point of Go if it's a pain like C in such regard... If contains is so trivial, it should be self explanatory to add it to the standard library.
    – Akito
    Mar 8, 2022 at 23:02
220

As of Go 1.21, you can use the stdlib slices package which was promoted from the experimental package previously mentioned.

import  "slices"

things := []string{"foo", "bar", "baz"}
slices.Contains(things, "foo") // true

Original Answer:

Starting with Go 1.18, you can use the slices package – specifically the generic Contains function: https://pkg.go.dev/golang.org/x/exp/slices#Contains.

go get golang.org/x/exp/slices
import  "golang.org/x/exp/slices"
things := []string{"foo", "bar", "baz"}
slices.Contains(things, "foo") // true

Note that since this is outside the stdlib as an experimental package, it is not bound to the Go 1 Compatibility Promise™ and may change before being formally added to the stdlib.

2
  • 2
    unfortunately you cannot use Go 1.18 with older versions of macOS May 24, 2022 at 21:11
  • could not read Username for 'github.com': terminal prompts disabled Got above error during go get Jan 23 at 13:11
54

With Go 1.18+ we could use generics.

func Contains[T comparable](s []T, e T) bool {
    for _, v := range s {
        if v == e {
            return true
        }
    }
    return false
}
6
  • 119
    Go is my favorite language because I love creating utilities from scratch that other languages offers OOTB. Feb 11, 2022 at 20:05
  • 7
    @AbhijitSarkar I realize you're being facetious, and I do also agree that this should be in the stdlib, but generics were just introduced to Go. I prefer a language that is very deliberate about the features it introduces and remains relatively simple. I'm hopeful that over time this will be added to Golang.
    – dimiguel
    May 7, 2022 at 16:03
  • 1
    youtube.com/watch?v=PAAkCSZUG1c&t=9m28s
    – Amar
    May 12, 2022 at 10:57
  • 9
    I would rather spend effort in writing business logic than writing utilities.
    – Hem
    Sep 20, 2022 at 20:39
  • 5
    It seems like in golang they are trading simplicity in language implementation for additional complexity for anyone using it. I'm assuming every golang developer simply has all of the basic functionality implemented somewhere and copies and pastes it between their projects. It's basically Javascript all over again, except code quality is higher due to the high barrier to entry
    – Brandon
    Sep 22, 2022 at 21:42
26

The sort package provides the building blocks if your slice is sorted or you are willing to sort it.

input := []string{"bird", "apple", "ocean", "fork", "anchor"}
sort.Strings(input)

fmt.Println(contains(input, "apple")) // true
fmt.Println(contains(input, "grow"))  // false

...

func contains(s []string, searchterm string) bool {
    i := sort.SearchStrings(s, searchterm)
    return i < len(s) && s[i] == searchterm
}

SearchString promises to return the index to insert x if x is not present (it could be len(a)), so a check of that reveals whether the string is contained the sorted slice.

4
  • 2
    In terms of time, the regular search is O(n) and this solution makes it O(n*log(n)).
    – plesiv
    May 9, 2020 at 19:18
  • 2
    @plesiv it’s a binary search, AFAICS. Wouldn’t that make it O(log n)? May 9, 2020 at 19:52
  • 9
    yes, binary-search and the function contains are O(log(n)), but the overall approach is O(n*log(n)) due to the sort.
    – plesiv
    May 25, 2020 at 14:06
  • 1
    @plesiv Yes that's true for a single search, but if searching many times, say n times, then it's O(n + n * log(n)) vs O(n * n). Henrik's answer shows searching more than one time.
    – Zamicol
    Jul 13, 2022 at 20:57
21

Instead of using a slice, map may be a better solution.

simple example:

package main

import "fmt"


func contains(slice []string, item string) bool {
    set := make(map[string]struct{}, len(slice))
    for _, s := range slice {
        set[s] = struct{}{}
    }

    _, ok := set[item] 
    return ok
}

func main() {

    s := []string{"a", "b"}
    s1 := "a"
    fmt.Println(contains(s, s1))

}

http://play.golang.org/p/CEG6cu4JTf

2
  • 55
    In its current form this code offers no benefit, since there is no point in constructing a map from a slice if you are only going to use it once. — To be useful, this code should rather provide a function sliceToMap that does all the preparation. After that, querying the map is trivial and efficient. Oct 26, 2015 at 21:13
  • 1
    You are creating a map by iterating the slice, it is double the work, more code, less efficient
    – Junaed
    May 27, 2022 at 10:20
18

If the slice is sorted, there is a binary search implemented in the sort package.

0
9
func Contain(target interface{}, list interface{}) (bool, int) {
    if reflect.TypeOf(list).Kind() == reflect.Slice || reflect.TypeOf(list).Kind() == reflect.Array {
        listvalue := reflect.ValueOf(list)
        for i := 0; i < listvalue.Len(); i++ {
            if target == listvalue.Index(i).Interface() {
                return true, i
            }
        }
    }
    if reflect.TypeOf(target).Kind() == reflect.String && reflect.TypeOf(list).Kind() == reflect.String {
        return strings.Contains(list.(string), target.(string)), strings.Index(list.(string), target.(string))
    }
    return false, -1
}
6

I think map[x]bool is more useful than map[x]struct{}.

Indexing the map for an item that isn't present will return false. so instead of _, ok := m[X], you can just say m[X].

This makes it easy to nest inclusion tests in expressions.

1
  • This is good, but keep in mind that struct{} has space complexity of 0 while bool has more
    – Seraf
    Feb 24 at 13:59
5

You can use the reflect package to iterate over an interface whose concrete type is a slice:

func HasElem(s interface{}, elem interface{}) bool {
    arrV := reflect.ValueOf(s)

    if arrV.Kind() == reflect.Slice {
        for i := 0; i < arrV.Len(); i++ {

            // XXX - panics if slice element points to an unexported struct field
            // see https://golang.org/pkg/reflect/#Value.Interface
            if arrV.Index(i).Interface() == elem {
                return true
            }
        }
    }

    return false
}

https://play.golang.org/p/jL5UD7yCNq

2
  • 7
    Sure you can use the reflect package but just because you can, doesn't mean you should. Reflection is very expensive. Jul 2, 2019 at 1:22
  • 1
    In actual application code no, you shouldn't do this. It is expensive. However, for unit tests, it doesn't matter so much and is very useful. May 14, 2021 at 2:12
4

Not sure generics are needed here. You just need a contract for your desired behavior. Doing the following is no more than what you would have to do in other languages if you wanted your own objects to behave themselves in collections, by overriding Equals() and GetHashCode() for instance.

type Identifiable interface{
    GetIdentity() string
}

func IsIdentical(this Identifiable, that Identifiable) bool{
    return (&this == &that) || (this.GetIdentity() == that.GetIdentity())
}

func contains(s []Identifiable, e Identifiable) bool {
    for _, a := range s {
        if IsIdentical(a,e) {
            return true
        }
    }
    return false
}
1
  • 1
    "is no more than what you would have to do in other languages" isn't really true - e.g. in C# Contains() is implemented on List<T>, so you only ever have to implement Equals() for that work.
    – George
    May 17, 2019 at 2:01
3

If it is not feasable to use a map for finding items based on a key, you can consider the goderive tool. Goderive generates a type specific implementation of a contains method, making your code both readable and efficient.

Example;

type Foo struct {
    Field1 string
    Field2 int
} 

func Test(m Foo) bool {
     var allItems []Foo
     return deriveContainsFoo(allItems, m)
}

To generate the deriveContainsFoo method:

  • Install goderive with go get -u github.com/awalterschulze/goderive
  • Run goderive ./... in your workspace folder

This method will be generated for deriveContains:

func deriveContainsFoo(list []Foo, item Foo) bool {
    for _, v := range list {
        if v == item {
            return true
        }
    }
    return false
}

Goderive has support for quite some other useful helper methods to apply a functional programming style in go.

2

Complementing @Adolfo's answer (and other answers here), the Contains function won't be something experimental anymore. Starting with GO v1.21, which will be released during August 2023, the aforementioned slice package will be included into the core library (besides some other interesting packages like map and cmp), making it possible to run a linear search over a slice of elements (O(N) time complexity).

Additionally you will have some other interesting variations for searching an element (or elements) within a slice, like the new ContainsFunc, which reports whether at least one element e of s satisfies f(e). You can check this at the example below, which is taken from the actual docs:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "slices"
)

func main() {
    numbers := []int{0, 42, -10, 8}
    hasNegative := slices.ContainsFunc(numbers, func(n int) bool {
        return n < 0
    })
    fmt.Println("Has a negative:", hasNegative)
    hasOdd := slices.ContainsFunc(numbers, func(n int) bool {
        return n%2 != 0
    })
    fmt.Println("Has an odd number:", hasOdd)
}

Also, to keep in mind, if you are working with a sorted slice and you want to reduce the time complexity when searching for an element (O(logN)), you will also be able to use the BinarySearch and the BinarySearchFunc functions, which will also come with this new package.

Finally, if you want to make the search constant in time (O(1)), I would go for the approach suggested by @tux21b in the voted answer by using maps.

1

The go style:

func Contains(n int, match func(i int) bool) bool {
    for i := 0; i < n; i++ {
        if match(i) {
            return true
        }
    }
    return false
}


s := []string{"a", "b", "c", "o"}
// test if s contains "o"
ok := Contains(len(s), func(i int) bool {
    return s[i] == "o"
})
1
  • 3
    This does not answer the question, nor gives additional information.
    – Croolman
    Nov 15, 2019 at 12:13
0

If you have a byte slice, you can use bytes package:

package main
import "bytes"

func contains(b []byte, sub byte) bool {
   return bytes.Contains(b, []byte{sub})
}

func main() {
   b := contains([]byte{10, 11, 12, 13, 14}, 13)
   println(b)
}

Or suffixarray package:

package main
import "index/suffixarray"

func contains(b []byte, sub byte) bool {
   return suffixarray.New(b).Lookup([]byte{sub}, 1) != nil
}

func main() {
   b := contains([]byte{10, 11, 12, 13, 14}, 13)
   println(b)
}

If you have an int slice, you can use intsets package:

package main
import "golang.org/x/tools/container/intsets"

func main() {
   var s intsets.Sparse
   for n := 10; n < 20; n++ {
      s.Insert(n)
   }
   b := s.Has(16)
   println(b)
}
0
func contains(slice []string, item string) bool {
    for _, s := range slice {
        if s == item {
            return true
        }
    }
    return false
}
-1

I created the following Contains function using reflect package. This function can be used for various types like int32 or struct etc.

// Contains returns true if an element is present in a slice
func Contains(list interface{}, elem interface{}) bool {
    listV := reflect.ValueOf(list)

    if listV.Kind() == reflect.Slice {
        for i := 0; i < listV.Len(); i++ {
            item := listV.Index(i).Interface()

            target := reflect.ValueOf(elem).Convert(reflect.TypeOf(item)).Interface()
            if ok := reflect.DeepEqual(item, target); ok {
                return true
            }
        }
    }
    return false
}

Usage of contains function is below

// slice of int32
containsInt32 := Contains([]int32{1, 2, 3, 4, 5}, 3)
fmt.Println("contains int32:", containsInt32)

// slice of float64
containsFloat64 := Contains([]float64{1.1, 2.2, 3.3, 4.4, 5.5}, 4.4)
fmt.Println("contains float64:", containsFloat64)


// slice of struct
type item struct {
    ID   string
    Name string
}
list := []item{
    item{
        ID:   "1",
        Name: "test1",
    },
    item{
        ID:   "2",
        Name: "test2",
    },
    item{
        ID:   "3",
        Name: "test3",
    },
}
target := item{
    ID:   "2",
    Name: "test2",
}
containsStruct := Contains(list, target)
fmt.Println("contains struct:", containsStruct)

// Output:
// contains int32: true
// contains float64: true
// contains struct: true

Please see here for more details: https://github.com/glassonion1/xgo/blob/main/contains.go

-2

There are several packages that can help, but this one seems promising:

https://github.com/wesovilabs/koazee

var numbers = []int{1, 5, 4, 3, 2, 7, 1, 8, 2, 3}
contains, _ := stream.Contains(7)
fmt.Printf("stream.Contains(7): %v\n", contains)
-3

It might be considered a bit 'hacky' but depending the size and contents of the slice, you can join the slice together and do a string search.

For example you have a slice containing single word values (e.g. "yes", "no", "maybe"). These results are appended to a slice. If you want to check if this slice contains any "maybe" results, you may use

exSlice := ["yes", "no", "yes", "maybe"]
if strings.Contains(strings.Join(exSlice, ","), "maybe") {
  fmt.Println("We have a maybe!")
}

How suitable this is really depends on the size of the slice and length of its members. There may be performance or suitability issues for large slices or long values, but for smaller slices of finite size and simple values it is a valid one-liner to achieve the desired result.

2
  • Will not work for situation where elements have similar text but not exactly the same exSlice := ["yes and no", "maybe", "maybe another"] Apr 21, 2020 at 18:41
  • 2
    This is a rather nice approach for achieving a quick-and-dirty one-liner solution. You just need to require an unambiguous delimiter (could be a comma) and do the extra work to bracket both strings: ","+strings.Join(exSlice,",")+",", and ",maybe," Jun 21, 2020 at 13:27

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