23

I want to look up a word in multiple files, and return only a single line per result, or a limited number of characters (40 ~ 80 characters for example), and not the entire line, as by default.

grep -sR 'wp-content' .

file_1.sql:3309:blog/wp-content 
file_1.sql:3509:blog/wp-content 
file_2.sql:309:blog/wp-content 

Currently I see the following:

grep -sR 'wp-content' .

file_1.sql:3309:blog/wp-content-Progressively predominate impactful systems without resource-leveling best practices. Uniquely maximize virtual channels and inexpensive results. Uniquely procrastinate multifunctional leadership skills without visionary systems. Continually redefine prospective deliverables without.
file_1.sql:3509:blog/wp-content-Progressively predominate impactful systems without resource-leveling best practices. Uniquely maximize virtual channels and inexpensive results. Uniquely procrastinate multifunctional leadership skills without visionary systems. Continually redefine prospective deliverables without. 
file_2.sql:309:blog/wp-content-Progressively predominate impactful systems without resource-leveling best practices. Uniquely maximize virtual channels and inexpensive results. Uniquely procrastinate multifunctional leadership skills without visionary systems. Continually redefine prospective deliverables without.
1

3 Answers 3

22

You could use a combination of grep and cut

Using your example I would use:

grep -sRn 'wp-content' .|cut -c -40
grep -sRn 'wp-content' .|cut -c -80

That would give you the first 40 or 80 characters respectively.

edit:

Also, theres a flag in grep, that you could use:

-m NUM, --max-count=NUM
          Stop reading a file after NUM matching lines.

This with a combination of what I previously wrote:

grep -sRnm 1 'wp-content' .|cut -c -40
grep -sRnm 1 'wp-content' .|cut -c -80

That should give you the first time it appears per file, and only the first 40 or 80 chars.

1
  • 2
    I really prefer this option as you don't need to modify your regex. Mar 11, 2017 at 1:37
19
 egrep -Rso '.{0,40}wp-content.{0,40}' *.sh

This will not call the Radio-Symphonie-Orchestra, but -o(nly matching).

A maximum of 40 characters before and behind your pattern. Note: *e*grep.

2
  • 2
    egrep is now deprecated. Use grep -E instead.
    – ruuter
    Dec 30, 2015 at 20:00
  • @ruuter: On my recent linux (xubuntu 15.10), egrep is exec grep -E "$@". AFAIK this is the case for a long time. Dec 31, 2015 at 2:33
4

If you change the regex to '^.*wp-content' you can use egrep -o. For example,

egrep -sRo '^.*wp-content' .

The -o flag make egrep only print out the portion of the line that matches. So matching from the start of line to wp-content should yield the sample output in your first code block.

4
  • I may not have correctly understood the command, but did not work, he still listing the same way. May 8, 2012 at 12:47
  • If your content is what you have in your example, it should output everything up to wp-content, and nothing past that. That should be the same output in your first code block. However, judging by the other answers, that may or may not be what you actually want.
    – Tim Pote
    May 8, 2012 at 13:19
  • @PatrickMaciel See my changes. I expanded my explanation of the -o flag.
    – Tim Pote
    May 8, 2012 at 14:02
  • This doesn't limit the line length, unfortunately, so if what you're searching for shows up somewhere in a minified file it'll still show a wall of text. You could modify it to something like '.{0,50}wp-content.{0,50}', but performance on that is pretty bad.
    – lobati
    Apr 13, 2017 at 19:06

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.