When I use open() to open a file, I am not able to write unicode strings. I have learned that I need to use codecs and open the file with Unicode encoding (see http://docs.python.org/howto/unicode.html#reading-and-writing-unicode-data).

Now I need to create some temporary files. I tried to use the tempfile library, but it doesn't have any encoding option. When I try to write any unicode string in a temporary file with tempfile, it fails:

#!/usr/bin/python2.6
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
import tempfile
with tempfile.TemporaryFile() as fh:
  fh.write(u"Hello World: ä")
  fh.seek(0)
  for line in fh:
    print line

How can I create a temporary file with Unicode encoding in Python?

Edit:

  1. I am using Linux and the error message that I get for this code is:

    Traceback (most recent call last):
      File "tmp_file.py", line 5, in <module>
        fh.write(u"Hello World: ä")
    UnicodeEncodeError: 'ascii' codec can't encode character u'\xe4' in position 13: ordinal not in range(128)
    
  2. This is just an example. In practice I am trying to write a string that some API returned.
up vote 18 down vote accepted

Everyone else's answers are correct, I just want to clarify what's going on:

The difference between the literal 'foo' and the literal u'foo' is that the former is a string of bytes and the latter is the Unicode object

First, understand that Unicode is the character set. UTF-8 is the encoding. The Unicode object is the about the former - it's a Unicode string, not necessarily a UTF-8 one. In your case, the encoding for a string literal will be UTF-8, because you specified it in the first lines of the file.

To get a Unicode string from a byte string, you call the .encode method

>>>> u"ひらがな".encode("utf-8") == "ひらがな"
True

Similarly, you could call your string.encode in the write call and achieve the same effect as just removing the u.

If you didn't specify the encoding in the top, say if you were reading the Unicode data from another file, you would specify what encoding it was in before it reached a Python string. This would determine how it would be represented in bytes (i.e., the str type).

The error you're getting, then, is only because the tempfile module is expecting a str object. This doesn't mean it can't handle unicode, just that it expects you to pass in an byte string rather than a Unicode object - because without you specifying an encoding, it wouldn't know how to write it to the temp file.

  • 3
    Yes. So, there's no need to open tempfile with some magic unicode option, it's enough to write an explicitly encoded string: fh.write(u'föo bār'.encode('utf-8')). Replace 'utf-8' with 'utf-16' if most of your characters are CJKs. – 9000 May 8 '12 at 1:08
  • 1
    @9000: beware of this method if you use 'utf-16'. If doing so you will have to write the whole file at once, because encode('utf-16') also output the file BOM. If you have several strings to write to the same file, the first one should be with .encode('utf-16') and the subsequent ones with .encode('utf-16-le') wich does not send the BOM. Using some magic unicode option avoid this pitfall. – kriss Jan 7 '13 at 8:13
  • "abc" is a Unicode string in Python 3 or in the presence of from __future__ import unicode_literals. – jfs Oct 12 '15 at 9:29

tempfile.TemporaryFile has encoding option in Python 3:

#!/usr/bin/python3
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
import tempfile
with tempfile.TemporaryFile(mode='w+', encoding='utf-8') as fh:
  fh.write("Hello World: ä")
  fh.seek(0)
  for line in fh:
    print(line)

Note that now you need to specify mode='w+' instead of the default binary mode. Also note that string literals are implicitly Unicode in Python 3, there's no u modifier.

If you're stuck with Python 2.6, temporary files are always binary, and you need to encode the Unicode string before writing it to the file:

#!/usr/bin/python
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
import tempfile
with tempfile.TemporaryFile() as fh:
  fh.write(u"Hello World: ä".encode('utf-8'))
  fh.seek(0)
  for line in fh:
    print line.decode('utf-8')

Unicode specifies the character set, not the encoding, so in either case you need a way to specify how to encode the Unicode characters!

  • That's a good idea to also decode the 8-bit string that's being read from the file (in the Python 2 example), converting it into a Unicode string, before printing. (Fixed it.) – Seppo Enarvi Oct 12 '15 at 21:38

I have figured out one solution: create a temporary file that is not automatically deleted with tempfile, close it and open it again using codecs:

#!/usr/bin/python2.6
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-

import codecs
import os
import tempfile

f = tempfile.NamedTemporaryFile(delete=False)
filename = f.name
f.close()

with codecs.open(filename, 'w+b', encoding='utf-8') as fh:
  fh.write(u"Hello World: ä")
  fh.seek(0)
  for line in fh:
    print line

os.unlink(filename)
  • I'm sorry, but this is suboptimal. See @spinning_plate's answer and my comment to it; things are way simpler. – 9000 May 8 '12 at 1:09
  • @9000 I don't see an answer of spinning_plate here. – guettli Apr 28 '14 at 15:05
  • @guettli: must be a some kind of typo; I must have meant the answer of dfb, currently the accepted one. – 9000 Apr 28 '14 at 15:28

Since I am working on a Python program with TemporaryFile objects that should run in both Python 2 and Python 3, I don't find it satisfactory to manually encode all strings written as UTF-8 like the other answers suggest.

Instead, I have written the following small polyfill (because I could not find something like it in six) to wrap a binary file-like object into a UTF-8 file-like object:

from __future__ import unicode_literals
import sys
import codecs
if sys.hexversion < 0x03000000:
    def uwriter(fp):
        return codecs.getwriter('utf-8')(fp)
else:
    def uwriter(fp):
        return fp

It is used in the following way:

# encoding: utf-8
from tempfile import NamedTemporaryFile
with uwriter(NamedTemporaryFile(suffix='.txt', mode='w')) as fp:
    fp.write('Hællo wörld!\n')

You are trying to write a unicode object (u"...") to the temporary file where you should use an encoded string ("..."). You don't have to explicitly pass an "encode=" parameter, because you've already stated the encoding in line two ("# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-"). Just use fh.write("ä") instead of fh.write(u"ä") and you should be fine.

  • Yes, this works, but I am actually trying to write a string that some API returned, so there is no (u"...") in my code. I have updated my question with this information. I tried an example with two files, and fh.write(other_file.f()) works or not depending on the other file having the encoding or not. In my real code I don't have any control of the code that is creating the string. – dbarbosa May 8 '12 at 15:12

Dropping the u made your code work for me:

fh.write("Hello World: ä")

I guess it's because it's already unicode.

  • Does the file have the correct output? – dfb May 8 '12 at 0:25
  • Yes, running the script on a linux box, without the u, produces the correct output Hello World: ä – John May 8 '12 at 0:30
  • Yes, this works... Actually in my real program I am getting the input from some API, and it fails, so it was not because of "the u" in my code. – dbarbosa May 8 '12 at 15:00
  • 1
    @john: Dropping the u is probably not doing what you believe even if you get the right utf-8 in the final file. It is likely that you used some utf-8 editor if so when typing 'ä' two bytes are stored in the string. This is easy enough to check. If so len("Hello World: ä") will be 15 and "Hello World: ä"[14] will be '\xa4'. – kriss Jan 7 '13 at 8:18
  • I think you're probably right @kriss – John Jan 29 '13 at 22:52

Setting the sys as default encoding to UTF-8 will fix the encoding issue

import sys
reload(sys)
sys.setdefaultencoding('utf-8') #set to utf-8 by default this will solve the errors

import tempfile
with tempfile.TemporaryFile() as fh:
  fh.write(u"Hello World: ä")
  fh.seek(0)
  for line in fh:
    print line

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