10

I'd like to make plots on 4 axes, first three individual plot on each axes, and the last all 3 plots on last axes. Here is the code:

from numpy import *
from matplotlib.pyplot import *
fig=figure()
data=arange(0,10,0.01)
ax1=fig.add_subplot(2,2,1)
ax2=fig.add_subplot(2,2,2)
ax3=fig.add_subplot(2,2,3)
ax4=fig.add_subplot(2,2,4)

line1=ax1.plot(data,data)
line2=ax2.plot(data, data**2/10, ls='--', color='green')
line3=ax3.plot(data, np.sin(data), color='red')
#could I somehow use previous plots, instead recreating them all?
line4=ax4.plot(data,data)
line4=ax4.plot(data, data**2/10, ls='--', color='green')
line4=ax4.plot(data, np.sin(data), color='red')
show()

The resulting picture is:
enter image description here
Is there a way to define plots first and then add them to axes, and then plot them? Here is the logic I had in mind:

#this is just an example, implementation can be different
line1=plot(data, data)
line2=plot(data, data**2/10, ls='--', color='green')
line3=plot(data, np.sin(data), color='red')
line4=[line1, line2, line3]

Now plot line1 on ax1, line2 on ax2, line3 on ax3 and line4 on ax4.

  • But what's wrong with calling plot again? Is that causing some problem? – wim May 8 '12 at 13:27
  • @wim it's not causing any problems in this case. But I'm always skeptical about the code if I need to use copy paste. Or if I wanted for example to send a plots of lines to some function that arranges the plots in some way on different axes. – enedene May 8 '12 at 13:38
  • 1
    Instead of creating figure, and then adding subplots you can do this in one line: fix, ax = plt.subplots(2, 2). Then ax is a numpy array of axes so you can ax[0, 1].plot(data, data**2 / 10, ls='--', color='g') – mmagnuski Jun 8 '16 at 20:27
5

Here is one possible solution. I'm not sure that it's very pretty, but at least it does not require code duplication.

import numpy as np, copy
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt, matplotlib.lines as ml

fig=plt.figure(1)
data=np.arange(0,10,0.01)
ax1=fig.add_subplot(2,2,1)
ax2=fig.add_subplot(2,2,2)
ax3=fig.add_subplot(2,2,3)
ax4=fig.add_subplot(2,2,4)

#create the lines
line1=ml.Line2D(data,data)
line2=ml.Line2D(data,data**2/10,ls='--',color='green')
line3=ml.Line2D(data,np.sin(data),color='red')
#add the copies of the lines to the first 3 panels
ax1.add_line(copy.copy(line1))
ax2.add_line(copy.copy(line2))
ax3.add_line(copy.copy(line3))

[ax4.add_line(_l) for _l in [line1,line2,line3]] # add 3 lines to the 4th panel

[_a.autoscale() for _a in [ax1,ax2,ax3,ax4]] # autoscale if needed
plt.draw()
1

I think your usage is fine, but you can pass all of the x,y data pairs to plot like this (although it makes it very horrible to read!):

ax4.plot(data, data, data, data**2 / 10, data, np.sin(data))

An amusing different way to do it is like this:

graph_data = [(data, data), (data, data**2 / 10), (data, np.sin(data))]
[ax4.plot(i,j) for i,j in graph_data]
  • I usually do things the wrong way, I must be getting better. :) I upvoted both solutions, the selection for accepted answer was arbitrary. – enedene May 8 '12 at 23:36
1

I had a simpler use case in jupyter notebooks. Given that you have stored a figure object somewhere, how can you replot it. eg:

Cell 1:

f = plt.figure(figsize=(18, 6))
f.suptitle("Hierarchical Clustring", fontsize=20)
dendrogram(Z, color_threshold=cut_off,
           truncate_mode='lastp',
           p=20)

Cell 2:

#plot f again, the answer is really simple
f
plt.show()

That's it. The benefit of that is you can store figures in objects and later use them when necessary.

0

Also this question has a good example of referencing to previous axes using:

fix, ax = plt.subplots(2, 2)
ax[0,1].plot(data, data**2 / 10, ls='--', color='g')

but also explains how to insert a title on each subplot using:

ax[0,1].set_title('Simple plot')

the dimension of ax depends on subplot parameters: if they are just tiled orizontally or vertically, ax will only need one index.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.