16

I created a simple program to delete temporary files in C# (for fun, not a major project) and am running into locked files (in use) issues. How do you normally either exclude those files? For reference I am receiving the error:

The process cannot access the file 'ExchangePerflog_8484fa31c65c7a31cfcccd43.dat' because it is being used by another process.

Code:

static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string folderPath = string.Empty;
        folderPath = System.Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("temp");
        deleteFilesInDirectory(folderPath);
    }

    public static void deleteFilesInDirectory(string folderPath) 
    {

        try
        {
            var dir = new DirectoryInfo(folderPath);
            dir.Attributes = dir.Attributes & ~FileAttributes.ReadOnly;
            dir.Delete(true);
            MessageBox.Show(folderPath + " has been cleaned.");
        }
        catch (System.IO.IOException ex)
        {
            MessageBox.Show(ex.Message); 
            return;

        } 
    }     
  • 1
    To clarify, do you want to skip over the files that are in use, or are you trying to force a deletion of them? – Tim May 8 '12 at 18:53
  • why not just collect undeleted files and show them after execution? Or you need to wait for them to get accessible? – cookieMonster May 8 '12 at 18:53
  • he said exclude so I think he means skip – Smash May 8 '12 at 18:54
  • This question is already answered, check this: stackoverflow.com/questions/6077869/… – LawfulHacker May 8 '12 at 19:00
  • There is also a utility called "Unlocker" - emptyloop.com/unlocker This can release the locks (as well as tell you who has them) which then allows you to delete them. More for investigation than general use, though. – dash May 8 '12 at 19:03
15

Description

There is no way to delete a file that is currently in use by another process. But you can wait till the file is not locked.

Check in a while loop till the file is unlocked with this method

protected virtual bool IsFileLocked(FileInfo file)
{
    FileStream stream = null;

    try
    {
        stream = file.Open(FileMode.Open, FileAccess.ReadWrite, FileShare.None);
    }
    catch (IOException)
    {
        //the file is unavailable because it is:
        //still being written to
        //or being processed by another thread
        //or does not exist (has already been processed)
        return true;
    }
    finally
    {
        if (stream != null)
            stream.Close();
    }

    //file is not locked
    return false;
}

Sample

FileInfo file = new FileInfo("PathToTheFile");
while (IsFileLocked(file))
    Thread.Sleep(1000);
file.Delete();

Update

If you want to skip locked files you can do this.

//
var dir = new DirectoryInfo(folderPath);
foreach(var file in dir.GetFiles()) {
    try
    {
        file.Delete();
    }
    catch (IOException)
    {
        //file is currently locked
    }
}
  • If for example I am deleting all temp files while the machine is running, and I keep Outlook open, the temp files that Outlook has will not be deleted until Outlook is closed. Therefore the program will continue to try to execute until Outlook is closed using this method. I would prefer to check if it is in use and skip it if it is in use. – Geekender May 8 '12 at 19:11
  • @Geekender ah ok, check out my updated answer – dknaack May 8 '12 at 19:15
  • The problem with this approach is that when IsFileLocked returns false, meaning that the file was not locked, it may end up being locked again for a brief period by the very code that has performed the verification. This can be easily observed on Windows. – BartoszKP Feb 16 '18 at 8:54
4

Well I have run into similar problems. When you try to remove directory shortly after removing file you have to force GC to release the file handle from current thread

public void DisposeAfterTest(string filePath)
    {

        if (File.Exists(filePath))
        {
            File.Delete(filePath);
        }

        GC.Collect();
        GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();

        if (Directory.Exists(this.TempTestFolderPath))
        {
            Directory.Delete(this.TempTestFolderPath, true);
        }

    }
1

Using dknaack's code. This worked in my case.

FileInfo file = new FileInfo("xyz.txt");
try
{
    for (int tries = 0; IsFileLocked(file) && tries < 5; tries++)
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
    file.Delete();
}
catch (IOException exception)
{
    Console.WriteLine(string.Format("File locked: {0}", exception);
}
0

I don't believe there is any way you can know in advance if the file is in use or not. You could try to get an exclusive lock on the file; but then you'd just be trading one exception for another.

If these are files you are opening, see if you can't do a better job of closing them. If it's more complicated than that - you could maintain a 'to delete list' and continue to retry the delete until it is successful (on another thread with a concurrent collection maybe).

I also don't believe there is anyway to forcefully delete an in-use file.

  • Is there such a thing as catch(System.IO.FileInUse) – Geekender May 8 '12 at 19:08
0

The below code will delete the files from a directory and all its sub-directories excluding the locked files and gets the list of the files that are not deleted. You can change the SearchOption to TopDirectoryOnly if you consider only the current directory.

string []files = Directory.GetFiles(dirPath,"*.*", SearchOption.AllDirectories); //this gets the files in all subdirectories as well
List<string> lockedFiles = new List<string>();
foreach(string file in files) 
{    
    try    
    {        
        file.Delete();    
    }    
    catch (IOException)    
    {        
        lockedFiles.Add(file);    
    }
}
  • 1
    @NineTails, he's not, it's an array, not an IEnumerable<T>. – Shimmy May 27 '17 at 21:53
0

There is only one method that you need to call, namely WipeFile and the code is as shown below. So, all you really have to do is call WipeFile and supply the full path of the file to be deleted, as well as the number of times you want to overwrite it.

public void WipeFile(string filename, int timesToWrite)
{
    try
    {
        if (File.Exists(filename))
        {
            // Set the files attributes to normal in case it's read-only.

            File.SetAttributes(filename, FileAttributes.Normal);

            // Calculate the total number of sectors in the file.
            double sectors = Math.Ceiling(new FileInfo(filename).Length/512.0);

            // Create a dummy-buffer the size of a sector.

            byte[] dummyBuffer = new byte[512];

            // Create a cryptographic Random Number Generator.
            // This is what I use to create the garbage data.

            RNGCryptoServiceProvider rng = new RNGCryptoServiceProvider();

            // Open a FileStream to the file.
            FileStream inputStream = new FileStream(filename, FileMode.Open);
            for (int currentPass = 0; currentPass < timesToWrite; currentPass++)
            {
                UpdatePassInfo(currentPass + 1, timesToWrite);

                // Go to the beginning of the stream

                inputStream.Position = 0;

                // Loop all sectors
                for (int sectorsWritten = 0; sectorsWritten < sectors; sectorsWritten++)
                {
                    UpdateSectorInfo(sectorsWritten + 1, (int) sectors);

                    // Fill the dummy-buffer with random data

                    rng.GetBytes(dummyBuffer);

                    // Write it to the stream
                    inputStream.Write(dummyBuffer, 0, dummyBuffer.Length);
                }
            }

            // Truncate the file to 0 bytes.
            // This will hide the original file-length if you try to recover the file.

            inputStream.SetLength(0);

            // Close the stream.
            inputStream.Close();

            // As an extra precaution I change the dates of the file so the
            // original dates are hidden if you try to recover the file.

            DateTime dt = new DateTime(2037, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0);
            File.SetCreationTime(filename, dt);
            File.SetLastAccessTime(filename, dt);
            File.SetLastWriteTime(filename, dt);

            // Finally, delete the file

            File.Delete(filename);

            WipeDone();
        }
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
        WipeError(e);
    }
}

I have added some events just to be able to keep track of what's happening during the process.

  • PassInfoEvent - Returns which pass is running and the total number of passes to be run.
  • SectorInfoEvent - Returns which sector is being written to and the total number of sectors to be written to.
  • WipeDoneEvent - An indicator that the wipe process is done.
  • WipeErrorEvent - Returns the exception if anything went wrong.

Securely Delete a File using .NET

-1

Try the following code. Just add two lines before file deletion:

GC.Collect();
GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
  • This will have no effect for trying to delete files that are in use by another process. – crashmstr Feb 4 '16 at 8:11
  • This is nothing to do with file deletion. This just instructs the .Net framework to force Garbage collection. – Chris Feb 4 '16 at 8:29
  • 3
    Actually this is a perfectly valid comment if you use SQLite. See stackoverflow.com/questions/8511901/… – Moeri Apr 6 '16 at 7:03
  • Worked for my issue! – TimmRH Jan 23 at 0:50

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