40

I want to determine if a value is integer (like TryParse in .NET). Unfortunatelly ISNUMERIC does not fit me because I want to parse only integers and not every kind of number. Is there such thing as ISINT or something?

Here is some code to make things clear. If MY_FIELD is not int, this code would fail:

SELECT @MY_VAR = CAST(MY_FIELD AS INT)
FROM MY_TABLE
WHERE MY_OTHER_FIELD = 'MY_FILTER'

Thank you

  • 2
    Update: later version of SQL have the TRY_CONVERT function – Nick.McDermaid Sep 12 '17 at 12:19
  • 1
    @Nick.McDermaid: Or as of SQL-Server-2012 simply: TRY_CAST(my_field AS integer) – Stefan Steiger Feb 26 '19 at 12:43

17 Answers 17

35

Here's a blog post describing the creation of an IsInteger UDF.

Basically, it recommends adding '.e0' to the value and using IsNumeric. In this way, anything that already had a decimal point now has two decimal points, causing IsNumeric to be false, and anything already expressed in scientific notation is invalidated by the e0.

  • 6
    The function shown in the blog post is flawed in several ways. DO NOT USE IT!!! These inputs return a positive result which is clearly incorrect: SELECT /*more than 18 characters-function should accept MAX data type and test more for invalid length*/ dbo.IsInt32('99999999999999999999999999999999999999999999930'), /* 18 characters, but clearly not a valid int */ dbo.IsInt32('999999999999999999'); – Orlando Colamatteo Jul 3 '13 at 17:39
  • I've attempted to come up with a solution that should address all border cases: stackoverflow.com/a/24250511/1149773 – Douglas Jun 16 '14 at 20:59
  • Agreed that this could be an issue for really fuky, long edge cases. But works great for basic integer (i.e. numbers between 1 and 1000) testing. You can easily add a length check to the string in this case. – Jerry Apr 5 '16 at 19:15
  • @Joshua - SELECT ISNUMERIC (CHAR(11) + '.e0') returns 0 in my case, thereby passing the test, not failing it – Reversed Engineer Jul 5 '19 at 14:25
  • It's work fine with me , Thanks – Anas Al-Qudah Oct 28 '19 at 7:37
23

In his article Can I convert this string to an integer?, Itzik Ben-Gan provides a solution in pure T-SQL and another that uses the CLR.

Which solution should you choose?

Is the T-SQL or CLR Solution Better? The advantage of using the T-SQL solution is that you don’t need to go outside the domain of T-SQL programming. However, the CLR solution has two important advantages: It's simpler and faster. When I tested both solutions against a table that had 1,000,000 rows, the CLR solution took two seconds, rather than seven seconds (for the T-SQL solution), to run on my laptop. So the next time you need to check whether a given string can be converted to an integer, you can include the T-SQL or CLR solution that I provided in this article.

If you only want to maintain T-SQL, then use the pure T-SQL solution. If performance is more important than convenience, then use the CLR solution.

The pure T-SQL Solution is tricky. It combines the built-in ISNUMERIC function with pattern-matching and casting to check if the string represents an int.

SELECT keycol, string, ISNUMERIC(string) AS is_numeric,
  CASE
    WHEN ISNUMERIC(string) = 0     THEN 0
    WHEN string LIKE '%[^-+ 0-9]%' THEN 0
    WHEN CAST(string AS NUMERIC(38, 0))
      NOT BETWEEN -2147483648. AND 2147483647. THEN 0
    ELSE 1
  END AS is_int
FROM dbo.T1;

The T-SQL part of the CLR solution is simpler. You call the fn_IsInt function just like you would call ISNUMERIC.

SELECT keycol, string, ISNUMERIC(string) AS is_numeric,
  dbo.fn_IsInt(string) AS is_int
FROM dbo.T1;

The C# part is simply a wrapper for the .NET's parsing function Int32.TryParse. This works because the SQL Server int and the .NET Int32 are both 32-bit signed integers.

using System;
using System.Data.SqlTypes;

public partial class UserDefinedFunctions
{
    [Microsoft.SqlServer.Server.SqlFunction]
    public static SqlBoolean fn_IsInt(SqlString s)
    {
        if (s.IsNull)
            return SqlBoolean.False;
        else
        {
            Int32 i = 0;
            return Int32.TryParse(s.Value, out i);
        }
    }
};

Please read Itzik's article for a full explanation of these code samples.

  • The pure T-SQL function fails with a "data truncation" error if the input is longer than 38 characters. See my SQLFiddle where I compare this solution and the currently accepted answer. – Iain Samuel McLean Elder Nov 26 '13 at 1:11
  • 1
    ISNUMERIC(',') returns 1 (true) which IMO is false! – Marc Jul 9 '15 at 11:44
15

With sqlserver 2005 and later you can use regex-like character classes with LIKE operator. See here.

To check if a string is a non-negative integer (it is a sequence of decimal digits) you can test that it doesn't contain other characters.

SELECT numstr
  FROM table
 WHERE numstr NOT LIKE '%[^0-9]%'

Note1: This will return empty strings too.

Note2: Using LIKE '%[0-9]%' will return any string that contains at least a digit.

See fiddle

  • 1
    ...assuming you only want to return positive integers. – DatumPoint Feb 13 '18 at 2:01
  • @DatumPoint You're right, it works for positive integers or 0. – 1010 Feb 26 '18 at 21:37
6
WHERE IsNumeric(MY_FIELD) = 1 AND CAST(MY_FIELD as VARCHAR(5)) NOT LIKE '%.%'

That is probably the simplest solution. Unless your MY_FIELD contains .00 or something of that sort. In which case, cast it to a float to remove any trailing .00s

  • This does not work for comma-delimited values. For example, ISNUMERIC('123,456,789') returns 1 – Elaskanator Apr 19 '18 at 20:05
3

See whether the below query will help

SELECT *
FROM MY_TABLE
WHERE CHARINDEX('.',MY_FIELD) = 0 AND CHARINDEX(',',MY_FIELD) = 0       
AND ISNUMERIC(MY_FIELD) = 1 AND CONVERT(FLOAT,MY_FIELD) / 2147483647 <= 1
3

The following is correct for a WHERE clause; to make a function wrap it in CASE WHEN.

 ISNUMERIC(table.field) > 0 AND PATINDEX('%[^0123456789]%', table.field) = 0
3

Necromancing.
As of SQL-Server 2012+, you can use TRY_CAST, which returns NULL if the cast wasn't successful.

Example:

DECLARE @foo varchar(200)
SET @foo = '0123' 
-- SET @foo = '-0123' 
-- SET @foo = '+0123' 
-- SET @foo = '+-0123' 
-- SET @foo = '+-0123' 
-- SET @foo = '.123' 
-- SET @foo = '1.23' 
-- SET @foo = '.' 
-- SET @foo = '..' 
-- SET @foo = '0123e10' 

SELECT CASE WHEN TRY_CAST(@foo AS integer) IS NULL AND @foo IS NOT NULL THEN 0 ELSE 1 END AS isInteger 

This is the only really reliable way.

Should you need support for SQL-Server 2008, then fall back to Sam DeHaan's answer:

SELECT CASE WHEN ISNUMERIC(@foo + '.e0') = 1 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS isInteger 

SQL-Server < 2012 (aka 2008R2) will reach end of (extended) support by 2019-07-09.
At this time, which is very soon, support for < 2012 can be dropped.
I wouldn't use any of the other hacks at this point in time anymore.
Just tell your frugal customers to update - it's been over 10 years since 2008.

2

This work around with IsNumeric function will work:

select * from A where ISNUMERIC(x) =1 and X not like '%.%'

or Use

select * from A where x not like '%[^0-9]%'

1

I think that there is something wrong with your database design. I think it is a really bad idea to mix varchar and numbers in one column? What is the reason for that?

Of course you can check if there are any chars other than [0-9], but imagine you have a 1m rows in table and your are checking every row. I think it won't work well.

Anyway if you really want to do it I suggest doing it on the client side.

1
declare @i numeric(28,5) = 12.0001


if (@i/cast(@i as int) > 1)
begin
    select 'this is not int'
end
else
begin
    select 'this is int'
end
1

I have a feeling doing it this way is the work of satan, but as an alternative:

How about a TRY - CATCH?

DECLARE @Converted as INT
DECLARE @IsNumeric BIT

BEGIN TRY
    SET @Converted = cast(@ValueToCheck as int)
    SET @IsNumeric=1
END TRY
BEGIN CATCH
    SET @IsNumeric=0
END CATCH

select IIF(@IsNumeric=1,'Integer','Not integer') as IsInteger

This works, though only in SQL Server 2008 and up.

0

Sometimes you don't get to design the database, you just have to work with what you are given. In my case it's a database located on a computer that I only have read access to which has been around since 2008.

I need to select from a column in a poorly designed database which is a varchar with numbers 1-100 but sometimes a random string. I used the following to get around it (although I wish I could have re designed the entire database).

SELECT A from TABLE where isnumeric(A)=1
  • 1
    While I encounter troubly databases quite often I'd like to say that poorly designed databases are not always the fault of developers. Budget is your true enemy in most cases. – Ben Fransen Mar 22 '16 at 14:08
0

I am not a Pro in SQL but what about checking if it is devideable by 1 ? For me it does the job.

SELECT *
FROM table    
WHERE fieldname % 1 = 0
  • For me this results in an error when fieldname contains a non-numeric string like 'Test'. – Tab Alleman Mar 7 '19 at 16:51
0

Use PATINDEX

DECLARE @input VARCHAR(10)='102030.40'
SELECT PATINDEX('%[^0-9]%',RTRIM(LTRIM(@input))) AS IsNumber

reference http://www.intellectsql.com/post-how-to-check-if-the-input-is-numeric/

0

As of SQL Server 2012, the TRY_CONVERT and TRY_CAST functions were implemented. Thise are vast improvements over the ISNUMERIC solution, which can (and does) give false positives (or negatives). For example if you run the below:

SELECT CONVERT(int,V.S)
FROM (VALUES('1'),
            ('900'),
            ('hello'),
            ('12b'),
            ('1.1'),
            ('')) V(S)
WHERE ISNUMERIC(V.S) = 1;

Using TRY_CONVERT (or TRY_CAST) avoids that:

SELECT TRY_CONVERT(int,V.S),
       V.S,
       ISNUMERIC(V.S)
FROM (VALUES('1'),
            ('900'),
            ('hello'),
            ('12b'),
            ('1.1'),
            ('')) V(S)
--WHERE TRY_CONVERT(int,V.S) IS NOT NULL; --To filter to only convertable values

Notice that '1.1' returned NULL, which cause the error before (as a string represtation of a decimal cannot be converted to an int) but also that '' returned 0, even though ISNUMERIC states the value "can't be converted".

-1

Why not just do something like:

CASE
WHEN ROUND(MY_FIELD,0)=MY_FIELD THEN CAST(MY_FIELD AS INT)
ELSE MY_FIELD
END
as MY_FIELD2
  • 3
    because SELECT ROUND('abc',0) throws an exception. – Tomas Pastircak Jul 8 '16 at 9:48
-1

This works fine in SQL Server

SELECT (SELECT ISNUMERIC(2) WHERE ISNUMERIC(2)=1 AND 2 NOT LIKE '%.%')

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