293

I'm using iTextSharp to read the text from a PDF file. However, there are times I cannot extract text, because the PDF file is only containing images. I download the same PDF files everyday, and I want to see if the PDF has been modified. If the text and modification date cannot be obtained, is a MD5 checksum the most reliable way to tell if the file has changed?

If it is, some code samples would be appreciated, because I don't have much experience with cryptography.

673

It's very simple using System.Security.Cryptography.MD5:

using (var md5 = MD5.Create())
{
    using (var stream = File.OpenRead(filename))
    {
        return md5.ComputeHash(stream);
    }
}

(I believe that actually the MD5 implementation used doesn't need to be disposed, but I'd probably still do so anyway.)

How you compare the results afterwards is up to you; you can convert the byte array to base64 for example, or compare the bytes directly. (Just be aware that arrays don't override Equals. Using base64 is simpler to get right, but slightly less efficient if you're really only interested in comparing the hashes.)

If you need to represent the hash as a string, you could convert it to hex using BitConverter:

static string CalculateMD5(string filename)
{
    using (var md5 = MD5.Create())
    {
        using (var stream = File.OpenRead(filename))
        {
            var hash = md5.ComputeHash(stream);
            return BitConverter.ToString(hash).Replace("-", "").ToLowerInvariant();
        }
    }
}
  • 243
    If you want the "standard" looking md5, you can do: return BitConverter.ToString(md5.ComputeHash(stream)).Replace("-","").ToLower(); – aquinas May 9 '12 at 16:25
  • 73
    MD5 is in System.Security.Cryptography - just to surface the info more. – Hans Apr 17 '13 at 5:06
  • 5
    @KalaJ: If you're trying to spot deliberate tampering, then CRC32 is entirely inappropriate. If you're only talking about spotting data transfer failures, it's fine. Personally I'd probably use SHA-256 just out of habit :) I don't know about support for CRC32 in .NET offhand, but you can probably search for it as quickly as I can :) – Jon Skeet Jul 30 '14 at 13:40
  • 11
    @aquinas I think .Replace("-", String.Empty) is a better approach. I went through a one hour debug session because I get wrong results when comparing a user input to the file hash. – fabwu Jan 1 '17 at 13:16
  • 7
    @wuethrich44, I think the problem you're having is if you copy/paste the code in aquinas comment verbatim; I happened to notice the same thing. There are two invisible characters--a "zero-width non-joiner" and a Unicode "zero width space"--between the "empty" quotes in the raw HTML. I don't know if it was in the original comment or if SO is to blame here. – Chris Simmons Jan 19 '17 at 16:17
62

This is how I do it:

using System.IO;
using System.Security.Cryptography;

public string checkMD5(string filename)
{
    using (var md5 = MD5.Create())
    {
        using (var stream = File.OpenRead(filename))
        {
            return Encoding.Default.GetString(md5.ComputeHash(stream));
        }
    }
}
  • 2
    I upvoted you because more people need to do things like this. – Krythic Jan 8 '16 at 0:12
  • 3
    I think swapping the using blocks would be useful, because opening a file is more probably going to fail. Fail early/fast approach saves you the resources needed to create (and destroy) the MD5 instance in such scenarios. Also you can omit the braces of the first using and save a level of indentation without losing readability. – Palec Jan 8 '16 at 10:00
  • 9
    This converts the 16 bytes long result to a string of 16 chars, not the expected 32 chars hex value. – NiKiZe Jan 14 '16 at 19:54
  • 3
    This code does not produce the expected result (assumed expectation). Agreeing with @NiKiZe – Nick Jan 15 '16 at 17:31
  • also a reference is missing: using System.Text; – Mohsen Abasi Dec 25 '16 at 9:52
7

I know this question was already answered, but this is what I use:

using (FileStream fStream = File.OpenRead(filename)) {
    return GetHash<MD5>(fStream)
}

Where GetHash:

public static String GetHash<T>(Stream stream) where T : HashAlgorithm {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

    MethodInfo create = typeof(T).GetMethod("Create", new Type[] {});
    using (T crypt = (T) create.Invoke(null, null)) {
        byte[] hashBytes = crypt.ComputeHash(stream);
        foreach (byte bt in hashBytes) {
            sb.Append(bt.ToString("x2"));
        }
    }
    return sb.ToString();
}

Probably not the best way, but it can be handy.

  • I have made a small change to your GetHash function. I've turned it into an extension method and removed the reflection code. – Leslie Marshall Feb 28 '17 at 18:41
  • 2
    public static String GetHash<T>(this Stream stream) where T : HashAlgorithm, new() { StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(); using (T crypt = new T()) { byte[] hashBytes = crypt.ComputeHash(stream); foreach (byte bt in hashBytes) { sb.Append(bt.ToString("x2")); } } return sb.ToString(); } – Leslie Marshall Feb 28 '17 at 18:42
  • This actually worked.... thank you!. I spent far to long looking online for the result that would produce a normal 32 char md5 string than I would have expected. This a little more complicated that I would prefer but it definitely works. – Troublesum May 26 '17 at 0:01
  • 1
    @LeslieMarshall if you are going to use it as a extension method then you should reset the stream location rather than leaving it at the end position – MikeT Jul 3 '17 at 11:24
3

Here is a slightly simpler version that I found. It reads the entire file in one go and only requires a single using directive.

byte[] ComputeHash(string filePath)
{
    using (var md5 = MD5.Create())
    {
        return md5.ComputeHash(File.ReadAllBytes(filePath));
    }
}
  • 46
    The downside of using ReadAllBytes is that it loads the whole file into a single array. That doesn't work at all for files larger than 2 GiB and puts a lot of pressure on the GC even for medium sized files. Jon's answer is only slightly more complex, but doesn't suffer from these problems. So I prefer his answer over yours. – CodesInChaos Dec 15 '14 at 11:23
  • Put in the usings after each other with out the first curly braces using (var md5 = MD5.Create()) using (var stream = File.OpenRead(filename)) gives you one using per line without unnecessary indentation. – NiKiZe Jan 14 '16 at 19:50
  • 2
    @NiKiZe You can put an entire program on one line and eliminate ALL indentation. You can even use XYZ as variable names! What is the benefit to others? – Derek Johnson Aug 11 '17 at 17:59
  • @DerekJohnson the point I was trying to make was probably that "and only requires a single using directive." was not really a good reason to read everything into memory. The more effective approach is to stream in the data into ComputeHash, and if possible using should only be used, but I can totally understand if you want to avoid the extra level of indentation. – NiKiZe Aug 12 '17 at 18:32
3

And if you need to calculate the MD5 to see whether it matches the MD5 of an Azure blob, then this SO question and answer might be helpful: MD5 hash of blob uploaded on Azure doesnt match with same file on local machine

0

I know that I am late to party but performed test before actually implement the solution.

I did perform test against inbuilt MD5 class and also md5sum.exe. In my case inbuilt class took 13 second where md5sum.exe too around 16-18 seconds in every run.

    DateTime current = DateTime.Now;
    string file = @"C:\text.iso";//It's 2.5 Gb file
    string output;
    using (var md5 = MD5.Create())
    {
        using (var stream = File.OpenRead(file))
        {
            byte[] checksum = md5.ComputeHash(stream);
            output = BitConverter.ToString(checksum).Replace("-", String.Empty).ToLower();
            Console.WriteLine("Total seconds : " + (DateTime.Now - current).TotalSeconds.ToString() + " " + output);
        }
    }

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