20

I need to have a conditional where clause that operates as so:

Select *
From Table
If (@booleanResult)
Begin
  Where Column1 = 'value1'
End
Else
Begin
  Where column1 = 'value1' and column2 = 'value2'
End

Any help would be appreciated.

35

Could you just do the following?

SELECT
    *
FROM
    Table
WHERE
    (@booleanResult = 1
    AND Column1 = 'value1')
OR
    (@booleanResult = 0
    AND Column1 = 'value1'
    AND Column2 = 'value2')
  • Won't this give me both sides of the OR in my result? – Yatrix May 9 '12 at 18:22
  • I came back to this and changed the accepted answer. After looking back over it, what I wanted wasn't what I had really conveyed in the question. Siva answered more what I wanted, but you accurately answered what was asked. Sorry about that - this is the fair way to go about it. – Yatrix Jun 5 '12 at 18:31
  • Keep in mind that short circuiting doesn't always work as you expect in SQL. It's left to the db vendor to decide how to evaluate an expression. – Sean Glover Aug 16 '13 at 12:26
  • Just a thank you @diaho as this helped me just now to have a conditional where allowing either evaluation of an ID = 1 OR ID in (1,2,3,4) depending if the user passed anything into the stored proc :). – Richard Griffiths Jun 3 '16 at 10:23
13

You can group conditions easily in a WHERE clause:

WHERE
   (@BooleanResult=1 AND Column1 = 'value1')
OR
   (@BooleanResult=0 AND Column1 = 'value1' AND column2 = 'value2')
  • Won't this give me both sides of the OR in my result? – Yatrix May 9 '12 at 18:24
  • 3
    @Yatrix yes it will. But you'll never match BOTH since you are checking @Booleanresult and it can't be both 1 and 0. – JNK May 9 '12 at 18:25
4

Based on the script in question, it seems that you need the condition for Column1 irrespective of whether the variable @booleanResult is set to true or false. So, I have added that condition to the WHERE clause and in the remaining condition checks whether the variable is set to 1 (true) or if it is set to 0 (false) then it will also check for the condition on Column2.

This is just one more way of achieving this.

Create and insert script:

CREATE TABLE MyTable
(
    Column1 VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL
  , Column2 VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL
);

INSERT INTO MyTable (Column1, Column2) VALUES
  ('value1', ''),
  ('',       'value2'),
  ('value1', 'value2');

Script when bit variable is set to 1 (true):

DECLARE @booleanResult BIT
SET @booleanResult = 1

SELECT      *
FROM        MyTable
WHERE       Column1 = 'value1'
AND         (        @booleanResult = 1
                OR  (@booleanResult = 0 AND Column2 = 'value2')
            );

Output:

COLUMN1 COLUMN2
------- -------
value1  
value1  value2

Script when bit variable is set to 0 (false):

DECLARE @booleanResult BIT
SET @booleanResult = 0

SELECT      *
FROM        MyTable
WHERE       Column1 = 'value1'
AND         (        @booleanResult = 1
                OR  (@booleanResult = 0 AND Column2 = 'value2')
            );

Output:

COLUMN1 COLUMN2
------- -------
value1  value2

Demo:

Click here to view the demo in SQL Fiddle.

  • Exactly what I needed. Thanks, Siva. – Yatrix May 9 '12 at 18:36
  • I just thought yours was the most complete example and most helpful to me, personally. Up votes for all, but there can be only one (accepted)! – Yatrix May 9 '12 at 19:04
  • I changed my accepted answer. What you gave me was exactly what I was looking for, but to be fair, as you stated, what they gave me was what I asked for. I just didn't ask the best question. At this point, I can't exactly remember what the question I really wanted was. =) – Yatrix Jun 5 '12 at 18:37
1

To provide a shorter answer:

Select *
From Table
Where Column1 = 'value1' and
      coalesce(column2, '') = (case when @BooleanResults = 0 
                                    then 'value1' 
                                    else coalesce( column2, '')
                               end)
  • 1
    Are you just making up syntax? What RDBMS is that valid for? – JNK May 9 '12 at 18:19
  • Oops, I had left in some extraneous characters. The rest of the syntax is standard SQL and should be understood by any databse that accepts local variables starting with a "@". – Gordon Linoff May 9 '12 at 18:23
  • The answer is shorter, but the code is not. However, +1 for avoiding the short circuiting, which makes it useful for more SQL flavors. – GlennFromIowa Dec 9 '15 at 19:07

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