12

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I wanted to ask how to parse a String and add a Line break (\n) every 100 characters. I know that you can parse The String with Regex, but don't know how to proceed later on. Can somebody help?

marked as duplicate by OrangeDog, Tunaki java Apr 14 '16 at 16:53

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  • 2
    Post us the code that you have, and we'll help you from there. – Jon May 10 '12 at 8:26
62

You could do something like so:

String str = "....";
String parsedStr = str.replaceAll("(.{100})", "$1\n");

This will replace every 100 characters with the same 100 characters and add a new line at the end.

The (.{100}) will capture a group of 100 characters. The $1 in the second will put the content of the group. The \n will be then appended to the 100 characters which have been just matched.

  • Weird, never thought about it before... smart indeed. – Buhake Sindi May 10 '12 at 8:32
  • 3
    Very smart solution. +1 I like it. – tgr May 10 '12 at 8:32
  • Nice solution. I should really take some time to understand regex... +1 – Wouter Konecny May 10 '12 at 8:39
  • @TheEliteGentleman: I only figured it out a few months ago, I think I've seen it for the first time on SO. – npinti May 10 '12 at 8:41
  • @T.Grottker: I appreciate your comment. – npinti May 10 '12 at 8:42
4

Quite simply:

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
for (int i = 0; i < str.length(); i++) {
    if (i > 0 && (i % 100 == 0)) {
        sb.append("\n");
    }

    sb.append(str.charAt(i));
}

str = sb.toString();
  • Nice one. I did a slightly different approach that doesn't iterate through each index. – Kaushik Shankar May 10 '12 at 8:39
1

Could try this perhaps?

String stringToParse = "abcde";

for(int i = 0; i < stringToParse.size(); i = i + 100){
   stringToParse = ((StringBuffer) stringToParse ).insert(i, "\n").toString();
}
  • string[i]? it's an array? – keyser May 10 '12 at 8:27
  • 3
    That's absolutely wrong, you're just replacing the character with a \n at index i. Besides, Java String can't be indexed. – Buhake Sindi May 10 '12 at 8:27
  • OP is not trying to modify the original data. This does not work. – Kaushik Shankar May 10 '12 at 8:28
  • I should probably clean the sleep out of my eyes before typing! Editing the answer now. – David K May 10 '12 at 8:30
  • Can you implicitly convert from String to StringBuffer? – Kaushik Shankar May 10 '12 at 8:38
1

I suggest using StringBuilder. It is efficient and can suit your task exactly.

String originalString = ... ;

// The new length of the string is
int newLength = originalString.length() +(int) Math.ceil ( originalString.length() / 100.0 );

StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder ( newLength );

I'll refer to each 100 character part of the string as a "chunk" so that its easy to see what's going on.

int chunkStart = 0;

while ( chunkStart < originalString.length() )
{
    // We find the index of the end of the chunk.
    int endOfThisChunk = Math.min ( chunkStart + 100, originalString.length() );

    // and this chunk to builder
    builder.append ( originalString.substring( chunkStart, endOfThisChunk ) );

    // append the new line character
    builder.append ( '\n' );

    // set the next spot for chunkStart
    chunkStart = endOfThisChunk;
}

return builder.toString();

Hope that helps! If you need more explanation please let me know!

1

i think this is a bit faster than % 100 and repeatedly appending

function(String input) {
    // array represantation of the String
    final char[] inputArray = input.toCharArray();
    // same length + amount of newlines (i.e. length / 100)
    final char[] outputArray = new char[inputArray.length + (inputArray.length/100)];
    int i = 0;
    int o = 0;
    while(i < inputArray.length) {
        // copy every 100th substring
        System.arraycopy(inputArray,i,outputArray,o,100);
        i += 100;
        o += 101;
        outputArray[o] = '\n';
    }
    // copy rest
    if(i < inputArray.length) {
        System.arraycopy(inputArray,i,outputArray,o,inputArray.length-i);
    }
    return(outputArray.toString());
}

though untested

  • Then your assumption that it's a bit faster than % 100 is unfounded and wrong if it hasn't been tested and compared with other solutions here or you may know of. – Buhake Sindi May 10 '12 at 11:17
  • well I said I think not it is so. Since op wanted a regex solution and my answer ist just another alternative, I didn't see any need for testing. I just wanted to hint, not to offense – Hachi May 11 '12 at 18:04
1

There is no need to parse the String via regex, you can just split it.

String s = "your very long String";
String[] splited = new String[s.size() / 100 + 1];
for (int i = 0; i < splited.length(); i++) {
  splited[i] = s.subString(0, 100);
  s = s.subString(100);
}

EDIT

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
for(int i = 0; i< splited.size(); i++) {
  sb.append(splited[i]);
  sb.append("\n");
}
String stringWithNewLines = sb.toString();
  • Split and then what? How do you add new lines and join it later? – Buhake Sindi May 10 '12 at 8:31
  • Did you test your code? I can still see that (the updated code) you have never put a \n nor does it do what the OP asks. – Buhake Sindi May 10 '12 at 8:34
  • I saved the substrings in an array. It is nearly trival to recombine it and add a newline, but I edit my answer. – tgr May 10 '12 at 8:51
0

As you cannot just add more charachters to a regular String in Java. You should use the StringBuffer to do this.

You can loop through the String with a for loop and then so something after every 100th character:

String string = "Some long string ...";
StringBuffer buffer = new StringBuffer();

for(int i = 0; i < string.length(); i++) {
    // Append a \n after every 100th character.
    if((i > 0) && (i % 100) == 0) {
        buffer.append("\n");
    }
    // Just adds the next character to the StringBuffer.
    buffer.append(string.charAt(i));
}

String parsedString = buffer.toString();
  • It will add a \n at i = 0. See my post. – Buhake Sindi May 10 '12 at 8:33
  • Stupid me, thanks for your comment. – Wouter Konecny May 10 '12 at 8:37
  • 1
    Why iterate through each i and add a character at a time? Wouldn't it be easier to add one full chunk at a time? (See my post) – Kaushik Shankar May 14 '12 at 19:37
  • Didn't thought of that that quickly. Nice one. – Wouter Konecny May 14 '12 at 21:12